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Article

Mohammad Habibullah Pulok, Md Nasim-Us Sabah and Ulrika Enemark

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how socioeconomic status and demographic factors were associated with child malnutrition as well as how these factors accounted…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how socioeconomic status and demographic factors were associated with child malnutrition as well as how these factors accounted for socioeconomic inequality of child malnutrition in Bangladesh during 2007-2011.

Design/methodology/approach

Data of this study come from two cross-sectional rounds (2007 and 2011) of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. This paper uses ordinary least square models to estimate the correlates of child malnutrition. The study further uses the concentration curve and the concentration index to estimate socioeconomic inequality of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. Finally, the decomposition method is used to explain socioeconomic inequality of child malnutrition in the study period.

Findings

Regression analysis indicates that child’s age, breast feeding, child’s birth order, the number of under-five child in the household, household wealth and parental education were strongly correlated with child malnutrition in Bangladesh. This study finds that absolute level of child malnourishment slightly decreased between 2007 and 2011, but socioeconomic inequality increased during this period. Children from the poorest household endured the burden of malnourishment more than those from the wealthiest households. The level of inequality also increased among the rural children, although it remained stagnant among the urban children. Decomposition analysis highlights that parental education had a significant negative relation with the average level of malnutrition, but its role was primarily centred among children from wealthier households.

Practical implications

An approach linking the ministry of health and education with other ministries may speed up the reduction of inequalities in social determinants of childhood undernourishment. Most importantly, there is a need for comprehensive government policies to reduce growing economic inequality and increase the relative income of the poor in Bangladesh.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to apply the decomposition method to explain the socioeconomic inequality of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. This paper presents an enriched understanding of socioeconomic inequality of child malnutrition in Bangladesh during 2007-2011.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

Pradeep Kumar Dahiya, M.J.R. Nout, Martinus A. van Boekel, Neelam Khetarpaul, Raj Bala Grewal and Anita Linnemann

The purpose of this paper is to address malnourishment in developing countries by a food-based approach in which locally produced and consumed foods are improved by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address malnourishment in developing countries by a food-based approach in which locally produced and consumed foods are improved by applying food processing techniques that benefit the amount and availability of desirable nutrients.

Design/methodology/approach

To facilitate this approach, this paper reports on the composition and in vitro micronutrient accessibility of 14 traditional mung bean foods from India in relation to their preparation methods.

Findings

Proximate composition, in vitro mineral accessibility, phytic acid and polyphenol contents varied among the range of products. Products requiring either fermentation or germination, had higher in vitro iron, zinc and calcium accessibility. Average in vitro iron, zinc and calcium accessibility of the mung bean products were 16, 9 and 418 mg kg−1 dry weight. Phytic acid and polyphenols averaged 2.1 and 1.8 g kg−1 dry weight, respectively, and were negatively correlated with in vitro mineral accessibility.

Practical implications

Different mung bean products (100 g) cover 12.0-59.5, 5.2-45.6, 4.2-28.6 and 1.1-7.1 per cent of the recommended dietary allowance for protein, iron, zinc and calcium, respectively, for seven- to nine-year-old Indian children.

Originality/value

This study demonstrated the wide range of traditional mung bean foods in India and presents options to tackle malnourishment by a food-based approach.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Jacqueline Doumit

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between nutritional status and associated risk factors such as:, socio-economic, physical, pathological and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between nutritional status and associated risk factors such as:, socio-economic, physical, pathological and psychological factors, among elderly residing in Lebanese nursing homes.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was carried out in 36 elderly care nursing homes with 2,094 residents. Of these, only 221 (11 per cent) elderly met the inclusion criteria and successfully completed the interview question. Data on socio-demographic characteristics and health conditions: oral, nutritional, depression, chronic diseases and activities of daily living, were collected. The analysis used a chi-square test and a binary logistic regression.

Findings

High levels of malnourishment were found among elderly who had no jobs (p = 0.012) and had oral health problems (p = 0.038), functional impairment (p < 0.001) and depression (p = 0.021). Comorbid illnesses, however, had no significant association with nutritional status. In addition, the first and strongest predictor entered in the regression on malnutrition was functional impairment (p = 0.002) followed by oral health problems (p = 0.030) and depression (p = 0.036).

Originality/value

The study is original in the sense that it emphasized the importance of three factors, autonomy, better oral and psychological health, in mediating nutritional outcomes for elderly residing in nursing homes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Expert briefing

Although the food sector has not been immune to the impact of COVID-19, it has proved relatively resilient. According to the UN, while the region’s overall GDP fell by…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB258401

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing

Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama were also affected, as were the Colombian islands of San Andres and Providencia, the latter reporting damage to 98% of its infrastructure…

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Article

Jehangir Bharucha

Around 67 million tons of food is wasted in India every year, which has a value of more than US$14 billion (Haq, 2016). The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on one…

Abstract

Purpose

Around 67 million tons of food is wasted in India every year, which has a value of more than US$14 billion (Haq, 2016). The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on one major source to which the current massive proportion of wastage can be attributed: restaurants. It investigates the statistics, the problem at large, how the restaurants are handling it and recommends ways to better manage the issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative inquiry has been used. The research population for this study consisted of 63 restaurant owners across Mumbai city and its suburbs. In-depth discussions were held with these restaurant owners/managers in various matters of interest to this study.

Findings

The group of restaurateurs opined that the solution to Mumbai’s restaurants waste management lies in micro management rather than large scale plans. In total, 75 percent of the restaurants have 10-20 percent extra preparation. High-end fine-dining restaurants make even more additional preparations and are the ones more receptive to participating and also sensitive toward importance of waste management. Several of the restaurant owners claim that they can estimate the requirements on specific days of the week. In all, 18 percent of the restaurants surveyed claimed to have a complete dispose of policy. Majority of the restaurants have a clear policy to distribute the surplus food among their staff. Several other innovative strategies were shared.

Research limitations/implications

The restaurant owners/mangers may not have truthfully answered all questions. The participants might have the fear that the authorities would take cognizance of some of the practices that they are following and would have been guarded in their responses. There would always be a fear that the identities would not be kept confidential.

Practical implications

India as a country has been agriculture based for centuries and characterized by massive food production. Yet, people face rampant starvation and malnourishment. This arises to a large extent due to the colossal amounts of food wasted at marriages, restaurants and even by destruction of crops.

Originality/value

The restaurant industry is of critical importance to the Indian economy and while research in India has focused on overall food wastage, studies on restaurant food waste are lacking.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Rosie Blount

Rising societal pressures for the Filipino urban poor population – precipitating increased crime – alongside widespread corruption, have led to many children being both…

Abstract

Purpose

Rising societal pressures for the Filipino urban poor population – precipitating increased crime – alongside widespread corruption, have led to many children being both lawfully and unlawfully detained in child rehabilitation centres. Far from rehabilitating, detained children live in prisonlike conditions, despite the illegality of child imprisonment in the country. Their human rights disregarded; they suffer from abuse, neglect and a multitude of health issues, with no access to healthcare. This study aims to explore the experiences and perceptions of formerly detained looked-after adolescents and their carers, on the priority health issues and key health determinants of detained Filipino children.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted in June 2019 in a Filipino children’s home for previously detained children. In total, 18 semi-structured interviews, using photo-elicitation, were conducted to retrospectively explore the experiences of formerly detained children and their carers, who were purposively sampled. Data were transcribed and thematically analysed. Ethical approval was granted by the University of Leeds.

Findings

Adolescents and carers commonly reported eight key health issues in detained children, namely, most frequently skin disease, mental health issues and malnutrition, then additionally wounds, respiratory disease, dental problems, sexual health issues and gastrointestinal issues. Six determinants of health in detainment centres were identified as follows: hygiene, food, weather, overcrowding, facilities and safeguarding issues.

Originality/value

The illegality and corruption associated with child detention centres mean the situation of detained Filipino children is difficult to assess directly. This study combats this by exploring the experiences of formerly detained children and their carers, to retrospectively assess the health of illegally detained Filipino Children.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article

Diwa Pandey, Mohammed H. Buzgeia, Safaa A.E. Badr, Faiza Gheith Senussi, Haifa Ibrahim El‐Mokasabi and Aisha Mohammed El‐Shahomi

The purpose of this paper is to identify the extent of actual malnutrition and its risk among cancer patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in the Libyan city…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the extent of actual malnutrition and its risk among cancer patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in the Libyan city of Benghazi.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional nutritional assessment study using the patient‐generated subjective global assessment (PG‐SGA) was carried out on 200 (91 males and 109 females) cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

Findings

A total of 25 per cent of the subjects were severely malnourished while 73.5 per cent were either at risk of malnutrition or suspected to be malnourished. Almost all (99.5 per cent) needed some degree of intervention (critical in nature for 83.5 per cent). Family income and physical activity were associated with nutritional status (p<0.05). Body Mass Index alone is an insensitive criterion for identifying malnutrition among such patients. All the sections and subsections of the PG‐SGA had a statistically significant positively correlation with its total score (r=0.51‐0.96, p<0.05). Dieticians played a very limited role in patient nutritional care.

Practical implications

It is suggested that dieticians should play a more participatory and prominent role in a multidisciplinary team involved in patient nutritional care. The PG‐SGA can help identify areas where tailor made strategies to counteract specific malnutrition or its risk can be planned, implemented and monitored.

Originality/value

There exists a considerable prevalence of malnutrition among Benghazi cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, most of whom need critical intervention.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Abstract

Title

GOONJ: the power of cloth.

Subject area

Strategic management and social innovation

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in strategic management and social innovation courses.

Case overview

GOONJ is a non‐profit organization which has life and dignity for lakhs of people in India over the last decade. It aimed at bringing up clothing as one of the important aspects of human life and make it available for the needy keeping their dignity intact. The case begins with Anshu Gupta, founder of GOONJ thinking deeply about the high‐priority meeting to take GOONJ to the next level and scale up the operations of his social innovation. It then tries to bring up the potential problem of clothing and menstrual hygiene in India followed by explanation of the present working model of GOONJ which allows them to manage the operations with 97 paisa per cloth. With the dream of taking GOONJ to the next level and converting it into a nation‐wide phenomenon, will the present model work?

Expected learning outcomes

This case will cover two important aspects: social innovation process (themes, challenges and implications for practice); and strategic management concepts (stakeholder theory, internal‐external factor evaluation).

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Gayle C. Avery

This interview discusses a “Blue Ocean” strategy initiative: how to introduce effective change in diabetes care into Thailand given a strong reluctance in patients, and in…

Abstract

Purpose

This interview discusses a “Blue Ocean” strategy initiative: how to introduce effective change in diabetes care into Thailand given a strong reluctance in patients, and in Thai society, to see that diabetes is not a condition to be treated by doctors alone.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview with Dr Thep Himathongkam, the pioneer of holistic diabetes care in Thailand.

Findings

One strategic management problem he faced was the lack of suitably trained staff. Thailand had no university courses producing the multidisciplinary personnel needed for diabetes treatment such as diabetes educators, dieticians, or foot care specialists. He address the multidisciplinary personnel shortage by training the missing specialists, getting universities on board and more recently securing funding from the World Diabetes Foundation.

Practical implications

The result of the diabetic foot-care training for more than 2,500 personnel, mostly from community hospitals, has been markedly successful, with a reduction in annual amputations in Thailand of 80 per cent over five years.

Originality/value

This interview offers a look at the multi-track problem solving required to successfully implement a Blue Ocean strategy.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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