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Article

Linus K. Munishi, Anza A. Lema and Patrick A. Ndakidemi

The purpose of this paper is to show how climatic change in Africa is expected to lead to a higher occurrence of severe droughts in semiarid and arid ecosystems…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how climatic change in Africa is expected to lead to a higher occurrence of severe droughts in semiarid and arid ecosystems. Understanding how crop productions react to such events is, thus, crucial for addressing future challenges for food security and poverty alleviation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored how temperature and rainfall patterns determined maize and beans production in Hai District in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania.

Findings

Annual food crops were particularly sensitive to the drought and maize and beans yields were lower than perennial crops during the years of drought. The authors also report strong and significant association between maize and beans production with temperature and rainfall patterns.

Practical implications

This study highlights how severe droughts can dramatically affect yields of annual crops and suggests that extreme climatic events might act as a major factor affecting agriculture production and food security, delaying or preventing the realization of the Millennium Development Goals.

Originality/value

This is the first study that highlights how severe droughts can dramatically affect yields of annual crops in Hai District contributing to other climate studies done elsewhere in Tanzania and the world at large.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article

Olusola Omueti and Olayinka Jaiyeola

This study seeks to investigate the comparative effects of local and imported coagulants on tofu yield and quality.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the comparative effects of local and imported coagulants on tofu yield and quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Soymilk was extracted from soybean variety, TGX‐923‐24 using cold water extraction method. The milk extract was coagulated to tofu using fermented maize liquor (FML), Alum solution (AS), lime‐juice (LJ), lime solution (LS), Calotropis procera stem extract (BSE) and calcium sulphate solution (CSS) fresh yields of tofu ranged from 318 to 380 per 200 g of bean, moisture content 60 to 72 per cent and protein 51 to 62 per cent. Yield of tofu coagulated with CSS was the highest (p < 0.05). Tofu coagulated with LS, AS, and FML gave similar yields which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than LJ and BSE coagulated tofu. The moisture content ranged from 60 to 72 per cent.

Findings

LS coagulated tofu had highest moisture content (p < 0.001) while AS coagulated tofu gave the lowest moisture content (p < 0.001). Protein content was significantly highest in LS coagulated tofu and closely followed by the value for FML coagulated tofu (p < 0.001). Sensory scores for both fresh and fried tofu showed that FML coagulated tofu was the most preferred by tasters in all parameters tested.

Originality/value

Fermented maize liquor is recommended for use in tofu production where available, based on its comparative yield, protein content and the superior acceptability attributes of tofu produced from it. The production of tofu using FML as coagulant could be easily achieved from an enterprise that only involves low capital input, thus making tofu a cheap and affordable source of protein for combating protein malnutrition.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article

Kwadwo Owusu, Ayisi Kofi Emmanuel, Issah Justice Musah-Surugu and Paul William Kojo Yankson

This paper aims to provide empirical evidence on the El Nino and its effects on maize production in three municipalities: Ejura, Techiman and Wenchi in the transitional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide empirical evidence on the El Nino and its effects on maize production in three municipalities: Ejura, Techiman and Wenchi in the transitional zone of Ghana. Using a mixed approach, the study details the effects of the El Nino on rainy season characteristics, particularly, rainfall amounts and distribution, onset and cessation of rains, duration of the rainy season and total seasonal rainfall and how it impacted smallholder maize production.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a mixed method approach in collecting and analyzing data. For stronger evidence building, (Creswell, 2013) the authors combined interviews and focus group discussions (FGD) to collect the qualitative data. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to extension officers, management information system officers and other relevant personnel of the Ministry of Agriculture in the three municipalities. Six FGD’s were held for maize farmers in six communities in all three municipalities.

Findings

The study shows that the 2015 El Nino had dire consequences on farm yields, subsequently affecting farmer’s incomes and livelihoods. The study further finds that complex socio-cultural factors, some unrelated to the El Nino, aggravated the effects on maize farmers. These include the lack of adequate climatic information, predominance of rain-fed farming, a lack of capacity to adapt and existing levels of poverty.

Originality/value

The study recommends inter alia, appropriate use of seasonal rainfall forecasting to enhance better farming decision-making and the development of elaborate climate variability interventions by national and local agencies.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article

In connection with the suggestion recently made in the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL to the effect that a National Pure Food Association should be established it is of importance…

Abstract

In connection with the suggestion recently made in the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL to the effect that a National Pure Food Association should be established it is of importance to call attention to the fact that a society describing itself as the “League for the Defence of Human Life” has been recently formed in Paris with the object of preventing the frauds practised by dishonest traders upon their customers. One of the obligations entered into by the members of the League is to discover and prosecute persons engaged in the sale of adulterated or injurious articles of food and drink. Judging from the recent reports of the proceedings of certain Parisian tradesmen it would appear that a society of this description has much scope for its operations in the French Metropolis, and, as we have suggested, a society with similar objects might with advantage be formed in this country, with branches in all the principal cities and towns. With the legal machinery placed at the disposal of local authorities, cumbrous, inadequate and weak as it is, much more might be done in the way of repression if only the responsible authorities could be brought better to appreciate their duty.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Clifton Makate, Marshall Makate and Nelson Mango

Improving the adoption rates of proven innovative practices in bean farming and their impacts on livelihoods requires persistent promotion of practices, complemented by…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving the adoption rates of proven innovative practices in bean farming and their impacts on livelihoods requires persistent promotion of practices, complemented by rigorous socioeconomic analysis that recognises the diversity of smallholder farmers. The purpose of this paper is to typify farm households in Angonia district of Mozambique, based on their socioeconomic characteristics prompting the adoption of proven innovative practices in bean production, management, and marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a multivariate statistical analysis approach that combines principal component analysis, and cluster analysis to clearly identify five distinctive farm household types with respect to the adoption of proven innovative practices in smallholder bean farming using socio-economic factors.

Findings

The study findings show that various socioeconomic factors define clusters and can be associated with the adoption and use of innovative practices in smallholder bean farming. The five farm types identified are: female landowners with small farm sizes (29.52 per cent); educated farmers with access to credit (6.63 per cent); relatively rich male land owners with large farm sizes and low education (8.73 per cent); youthful, inexperienced and poor male farmers (6.33 per cent); and experienced female farmers with high labour endowments (8.43 per cent). The respective farm types seemed to have different patterns in the adoption of proven innovative practices in bean farming.

Originality/value

The authors recommend that policy makers promote strategies meant to raise adoption of innovative practices in bean production, management and marketing in Mozambique that takes into account household diversity. The farm types identified by this study can be a good starting point for guiding such future efforts.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part

Edwins Laban Moogi Gwako

This chapter examines how Maragoli women farmers’ plot-level crop control, individual, and household variables affect yields. This chapter contributes to a holistic…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines how Maragoli women farmers’ plot-level crop control, individual, and household variables affect yields. This chapter contributes to a holistic understanding of the ramifications of quantitative and qualitative factors informing women farmers’ plot-level undertakings and yields as well as their innovative and creative strategies for optimizing output. It broadens the existing debate in the sub-Saharan African agricultural production literature by suggesting a composite measure of plot-level crop control as one factor influencing women farmers’ yields even in situations where land is owned by someone else. It also provides a rich discussion of the various and interlocking qualitative factors distorting women farmers’ incentive structures, efforts to increase plot-level yields and their strategies for minimizing the detrimental effects of the same.

Methodology/approach

A multimethod quantitative and qualitative ethnographic case study approach was used in this study.

Findings

This chapter demonstrates that women strategically bargained and invested more of their productive resources on the plots where they anticipated the greatest individual gains.

Practical implications

This chapter underscores women farmers’ ability to boost agricultural output when there are appropriate incentives for them to do so and suggests the theoretical and practical relevance of secure control and property rights over the products of the land not for the household (head), but for the cultivator. The chapter demonstrates and reaffirms that Africa women farmers respond appropriately to incentives and suggests that there is need for a customized, renewed, and sustained emphasis on women farmers’ empowerment and inclusion in all levels in the agricultural sector in order to actualize increased yields. Investing in women farmers and implementing policies that narrow existing gender disparities in African agricultural production systems is holistically beneficial.

Details

The Economics of Ecology, Exchange, and Adaptation: Anthropological Explorations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-227-9

Keywords

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Article

Eduardo Botti Abbade and Homero Dewes

Considering Brazil as a food producer with global prominence and the urgency for food security in some developing countries, the purpose of this paper is to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering Brazil as a food producer with global prominence and the urgency for food security in some developing countries, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the exports of Brazilian dry-beans against food security of its buyers.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation was conducted through analysis of data from official databases as FAO and WHO. This study elaborated dispersion maps crossing characteristics of the international buyers of Brazilian dry-beans considering their food security situations.

Findings

Brazil has a high domestic consumption of dry-beans, and exports are seen as a secondary activity. However, its production is superior to their domestic needs. Exports of Brazilian dry-beans are generally volatile and unstable. Evidence suggests that countries with serious problems of child and population’s malnutrition (e.g. India and Angola) buy more Brazilian dry-beans. However, their domestic consumptions are still low.

Research limitations/implications

This research based only on exports of dry-bean is faced as a significant limitation. Future studies adding other staple foods commonly consumed by economically disadvantaged populations may contribute to the investigation of the role of Brazil against the need for food security in developing countries and emerging economies.

Social implications

Social implications are focussed in the pursuit of malnutrition decrease in the populations of developing countries through the consumption of nutritionally rich and economically viable food, such as dry-beans.

Originality/value

The original value is based on the analysis of Brazilian dry-beans production and trades and its potential to contribute to nutritional safety and food security in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article

José Osorio-Antonia, Lila Margarita Bada-Carbajal and Luis Arturo Rivas-Tovar

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on the agribusinesses of corn production in Mexico is analyzed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on the agribusinesses of corn production in Mexico is analyzed, taking into special consideration the policy of encouragement to small producers, productive restructuring and identification of positive and negative effects. Second, the evolution of the US–Mexican maize belts (1994–2017) is analyzed, establishing the economic and political impacts with respect to NAFTA.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for a documentary meta-analysis study using data from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the System of Agricultural and Fishery Information (SIAP) in Mexico. The data were completed with documentary analysis of research on maize productivity.

Findings

Provided is the information about the impacts of maize belts in the United States (US) and Mexico, where it was determined that the leading states maintained productive hegemony to a greater and lesser extent and that Mexico experienced a productive reorientation. The findings show that it is a myth that there are losers in the maize agroindustry of Mexico and the United States as it is suggested that after twenty-four years they have become complementary.

Research limitations/implications

Summarized is the state of knowledge from 1994 to 2017, aligned to the databases of the United States and Mexico.

Originality/value

A need to study the relation between the productive evolution of maize production and NAFTA is identified.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

World Agricultural Resources and Food Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-515-3

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Article

Subir Bairagi and Alvaro Durand-Morat

Investments in agricultural research and development (AgR&D) have been an engine of agricultural productivity growth; as a result, food security and poverty situations…

Abstract

Purpose

Investments in agricultural research and development (AgR&D) have been an engine of agricultural productivity growth; as a result, food security and poverty situations have improved in many countries around the world. However, in Haiti, a small Caribbean country, neither has any formal agricultural research center (ARC) been established nor has a significant amount of money been invested for AgR&D. This paper aims to quantify whether setting up an ARC would be beneficial for Haiti.

Design/methodology/approach

A fixed-effects regression, the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodity and Trade impact and benefit – cost ratio (BCR) measures are used to estimate future benefits from setting up a new ARC in Haiti.

Findings

A total of US$21.0m annual investment is required for the proposed ARC, which could generate up to US$1.16bn in social benefits during the next three decades. In terms of BCR, if one dollar is invested for AgR&D in Haiti, the payoff could be US$1.33-4.52. Therefore, establishing an ARC is crucial for Haiti, as it is expected to generate positive benefits for society by helping formulate pro-farmer policies as well as disseminating modern agricultural technologies among farmers.

Originality/value

Because, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no such study in Haiti’s perspective, this study contributes to the country’s literature evaluating the feasibility of establishing a new research center in Haiti with a partial equilibrium economic model.

Details

foresight, vol. 22 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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