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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Leo Paul Dana and Craig S. Galbraith

Located in South-eastern Africa, between South Africa and Tanzania, Mozambique (population 19,000,000) is currently one of the poorest countries in the world with only a…

Abstract

Located in South-eastern Africa, between South Africa and Tanzania, Mozambique (population 19,000,000) is currently one of the poorest countries in the world with only a $1,300 gross domestic product per capita (purchasing power parity, CIA World Factbook, 2005). In spite of its rich natural resources, because of the chronic history of violence, dire poverty, HIV/AIDS (12.2% adult infection rate) and diseases related to pollution and natural disasters, Mozambique also has one of the lowest life expectancies in the world at 40.32 years (CIA World Factbook, 2005). The recent 2000 Mozambican floods alone displaced a quarter million residents into emergency camps, with the affected population reaching 1 million residents. In overall human and social development, Mozambique currently ranks 168th out of 177 countries in the U.N.'s Human Development Index (2003 HPI, U.N. Human Development Reports), and 96th among 103 developing countries in the U.N.'s human poverty index (2003 HDI-1, U.N. Human Development Reports).

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Developmental Entrepreneurship: Adversity, Risk, and Isolation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-452-2

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Abstract

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International Perspectives on Democratization and Peace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-068-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Channing Arndt, Sam Jones and Finn Tarp

We consider the relationship between external aid and development in Mozambique from 1980–2004, identifying the specific mechanisms through which aid has influenced the…

Abstract

We consider the relationship between external aid and development in Mozambique from 1980–2004, identifying the specific mechanisms through which aid has influenced the developmental trajectory of the country. We undertake both a growth accounting analysis and review the intended and unintended effects of aid at the micro-level. Sustained aid flows to Mozambique, in conflict and post-conflict periods, have made an unambiguous, positive contribution to rapid growth since 1992. However, proliferation of donors and aid-supported interventions has burdened local administration, indicating a need for deeper domestic government accountability. To sustain growth, Mozambique must maximize benefits from natural resources while promoting constructive international market integration.

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Theory and Practice of Foreign Aid
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-52765-3

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Ibeawuchi Ibekwe

The purpose of this study was to explore the views of chief finance officers (CFOs) of companies in Mozambique toward understanding corporate decisions to remain private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the views of chief finance officers (CFOs) of companies in Mozambique toward understanding corporate decisions to remain private despite the potential benefits of stock market listing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a qualitative approach. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 35 CFOs of the top 100 companies in Mozambique.

Findings

Although most of the CFOs interviewed were aware of the existence of the stock exchange of Mozambique, many of them had never considered listing their firms. The major themes that emerged for why they do not use the stock market include the need to maintain ownership and control, not to disclose proprietary information to potential competitors and no need for the stock market because of availability of other sources.

Practical implications

The study is of interest to corporate managers interested in sourcing funds in a manner that meets the peculiar needs of the firm. It is also important for policy makers in the government who are interested in developing relevant financial institutions that meets the need of potential users.

Social implications

New and growth companies drive economic growth through new product development and job creation on which the society depends. Their ability to do this in the long run greatly depends on their ability to access cheaper sources of funds that meet their peculiar needs.

Originality/value

No research has either quantitatively or qualitatively addressed the issue of why firms in Mozambique choose to remain private despite the incentives and potential benefits of listing. Studies conducted in the developed countries are not expected to throw much light on the countries like Mozambique because of the cultural and institutional differences.

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Carino Modan and Rusni Hassan

This paper aims to thoroughly examine the extent to which the current legal and regulatory framework is inclusive towards Islamic banking and finance (IBF) practices in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to thoroughly examine the extent to which the current legal and regulatory framework is inclusive towards Islamic banking and finance (IBF) practices in the attempts to introduce IBF as a significant component in the Mozambique’s financial system. This is achieved by providing a critical review on the Mozambican current legal and regulatory framework including the court and arbitration system, as well as the country’s financial institutions law and regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this study is the qualitative approach. The analysis made is based on descriptive and analytical approach whereby the study examined and critically analysed the banking regulations in Mozambique with the purpose of finding the legal gap in the existing legal and regulatory framework that allows the introduction of IBF in the country.

Findings

This study finds that whilst some legal provisions in the current legal and regulatory framework are conflicting with the Sharï’ah principles such as the definition of loans and the concept of interest, there is also a certain number of enabling features that can be immediately explored, including deposits (with no interest), leasing operations, investment funds or venture capital.

Research limitations/implications

At present, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt ever made to assess the compatibility of the existing Mozambican commercial laws with the Islamic principles hence identifying the challenges that might arise due to the implementation of IBF practices in Mozambique.

Practical implications

This paper has several practical implications in the sense that it helps the financial market authorities in Mozambique to be able to foresee possible inclusion of provisions on Islamic transactions in the country’s existing financial regulations.

Social implications

The contributions of this paper lie in the valuable recommendations made on the insertion of Islamic principles in the current regulatory framework as well as assisting in overcoming some of the conflicting aspects in medium to long term. Mozambique should explore and benefit from the experience and lessons learned by the neighbouring countries that have successfully adopted the IBF practice. It is recommended that the Central Bank should establish a “task force team”, comprising of multi-skilled professionals and experts in Islamic finance from various internal areas ranging from licensing to supervision together with Sharï’ah scholars and representatives from the Muslim Community, to study the required process for adoption of IBF in the country.

Originality/value

There is no other study on IBF in Mozambique, particularly on legal and regulatory aspects.

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International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Ibeawuchi Ibekwe

The purpose of this paper is to survey bank credit managers and analysts in Mozambique regarding their attitude toward firm diversification.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey bank credit managers and analysts in Mozambique regarding their attitude toward firm diversification.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty-five credit managers and analysts from 23 banks in Mozambique were surveyed about their views on diversification and diversified firms. Questionnaires were used. Data were analyzed using chi-square test and binomial test.

Findings

Credit analysts and managers in Mozambique have a generally positive attitude toward diversification. This is mainly due to the coinsurance effects and stability of cash flows that diversification could provide. They, however, prefer moderately diversified to highly diversified firms and related to unrelated diversified firms. This is a puzzle, given the expectation that greater unrelated diversification is better able to provide coinsurance.

Practical implications

The study provides information that is useful for understanding the diversification–cost of capital relationship and could help corporate managers in making capital structure decisions.

Originality/value

Previous researchers have not studied the attitude of credit managers/analysts toward diversification in Mozambique using the survey approach. The study contributes to the literature on diversification and access to external finance, the diversification discount and cash holding behavior of firms.

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Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Charles Sampson

This research attempts to identify and observe emerging features of public administration (PA) in Mozambique, Africaʼs newest democracy. Mozambiqueʼs public administration…

Abstract

This research attempts to identify and observe emerging features of public administration (PA) in Mozambique, Africaʼs newest democracy. Mozambiqueʼs public administration has had to assume a significant role in the process of promoting sustainable human development. Public administration in the country is challenged by Napoleonic character of Constitutional arrangements for administering public policy, shortage of skilled human capital and the apparent absence of human development plans that would facilitate a more engaged civil society.

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International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Anna V. John and Malcolm P. Brady

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to validate the consumer ethnocentrism tendencies (CET) scale in Mozambique and to describe the profile of CET in that country; to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to validate the consumer ethnocentrism tendencies (CET) scale in Mozambique and to describe the profile of CET in that country; to describe the effects of consumer ethnocentrism through the moderator of product type; and to discuss implications of Mozambican consumer ethnocentrism and its effects and make recommendations for practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based survey was carried out to collect data from 448 consumers in Southern Mozambique. The data were analyzed by using exploratory factor analyses, confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The CET scale has satisfactory psychometric qualities and can be used as a two‐dimensional construct in Mozambique. Mozambican consumers were found to be moderately ethnocentric. Their ethnocentric tendencies underpinned negative attitudes toward South African consumables. The study demonstrates the moderating role of product type and concludes that importers of South African agricultural consumables into Mozambique are more susceptible to the effects of consumer ethnocentrism than are importers of processed goods.

Research limitations/implications

The results cannot be generalized to countries and products which were not included into this study. The conclusions about the CET effects are valid only for the southern part of the country where the survey took place.

Practical implications

The authors suggest that South African marketing managers should pay closer attention to the competitiveness of agricultural consumables in Mozambique. By contrast, processed consumables from South Africa represent a lower risk. As the employment issue plays a central role in Mozambican consumer ethnocentric tendencies, the national policy makers might incorporate it into the messages of buy‐local campaigns. In addition, the buy local campaigns should position growing national industry as a future large employer in the country. The national suppliers of agricultural consumables are at less risk. On the contrary, national producers of processed consumables are at a disadvantage because ethnocentricity does not result in strong support of these products. Advertising messages with patriotic appeals may be ineffective. Thus, instead of country of origin, other extrinsic cues (e.g. brand, package and price) may be used to enhance competitiveness on the national market.

Social implications

Mozambican consumers are moderately ethnocentric. Consumer ethnocentricity and its effects in Mozambique are shaped by pragmatic motives originating from socio‐economic pressures such as the under‐development of the national production sector and high unemployment in the country.

Originality/value

The paper will be of interest to practitioners, e.g. foreign companies, exporters and Mozambican policy makers and producers. The findings suggest that foreign companies should not be overly cautious about selling their products in Mozambique because, being moderately ethnocentric, Mozambican consumers are open to purchasing foreign imports where there is good reason, for example, when locally made products are unavailable.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

Cassava production surged noticeably in Southeastern Africa beginning in the 1990s. The purpose of this paper is to examine the commercial responses and food security consequences of cassava production growth in the region.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper incorporates a mix of quantitative analysis, based primarily on original analysis of national farm household survey data, together with key informant interviews with value chain participants in the three neighboring countries of Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia.

Findings

In the cassava production zones, cassava's high productivity translates into per kilogram carbohydrate costs 60 per cent to 70 per cent of the cost of cereals such as maize and wheat, thereby opening up a range of profitable opportunities for commercialization of cassava‐based foods, feeds and industrial products. Despite this potential, cassava commercialization in Southeastern Africa remains in its formative stages, with only 10 per cent to 30 per cent of production currently marketed. Unlike West Africa, where cassava commercialization has centered on marketing prepared cassava‐based convenience foods, the emerging cassava markets in Southeastern Africa have centered on fresh cassava, low value‐added cassava flour, and experiments in industrial processing of cassava‐based starches, biofuels and feeds. Strategic investment in a set of key public goods (breeding, training in food sciences and food safety, and research on in‐ground cassava storage) can help to shape this transition in ways that benefit both commercial interests and the food security of vulnerable households.

Originality/value

The paper compares cassava commercialization across differing agro‐climatic zones, policy environments and food staple zones.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Case study
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Boris Urban, Stephanie Althea Townsend and Amanda Bowen

At the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to: evaluate the factors influencing entrepreneurship in an African context; discuss the relevance of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to: evaluate the factors influencing entrepreneurship in an African context; discuss the relevance of developmental entrepreneurship in an African context; assess an enabling environment and ecosystem for stimulating entrepreneurship; analyse and resolve practical issues in starting a business under challenging conditions; understand how accelerator programmes work in an African context; appreciate how partnerships can be leveraged to foster entrepreneurship; evaluate relevant business models and their challenges to grow enterprises; and understand the social entrepreneurship journey of a founder.

Case overview/synopsis

In March 2019, Elena Gaffurini, managing partner of DEV Mozambique (DEV), sat down to evaluate the business. DEV, based in Maputo and launched in 2015, was a consulting and services company supporting entrepreneurial development in Mozambique, by training and supporting small businesses in agricultural-related sectors to improve food security. Gaffurini – a self-proclaimed purpose-driven person – now questioned whether DEV’s impact on social and economic development was significant enough to justify the effort she and her team put into it and whether DEV should reconsider its current business model to create more impact.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate: MBA and Executive Education.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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