Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

S. Sarkar

Soya milk possesses dietetic properties, which include lower contents of saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose, and can reduce the risk of cardio vascular diseases…

851

Abstract

Purpose

Soya milk possesses dietetic properties, which include lower contents of saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose, and can reduce the risk of cardio vascular diseases. Partial substitution of milk solids with soya solids during the preparation of yoghurt further enhances its dietetic features.

Design/methodology/approach

Attempt has been made to highlight the nutritional and therapeutic properties of soya milk and its suitability for the manufacture of soyoghurt with enhanced dietetic properties. Basic steps for the manufacture of soyoghurt, such as preparation of soya milk base, addition of stabilizers, sweetening agents, starter cultures and flavors and storage stability of the finished products are described.

Findings

Soya solids in various forms such as soya milk, soya bean paste, soya protein concentrate and soya bean flour may be adopted during the manufacture of soyoghurt, but their concentration must be kept within the limits to sustaining the acceptability of the product. Problem of objectionable bean flavour and slower metabolic activity of starter cultures in soya milk can be solved with starter manipulation and introduction of sweetening agents and flavours.

Originality/value

Possession of nutritional and therapeutic qualities by soya beans have led to their exploitation for the manufacture of soyoghurt. Consumption of soyoghurt among health conscious people and allergic sufferers in search of meat replacer and dairy alternatives should be encouraged.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

George A. Gkionakis, George Heliopoulos, Anthony K.D. Taylor and John Ahmad

The objective of this article is to investigate the binding of several lactones to soya protein isolate and soya protein under different conditions and, particularly, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this article is to investigate the binding of several lactones to soya protein isolate and soya protein under different conditions and, particularly, the extent of binding of the lactones γ‐9, γ‐10, δ‐10 and δ‐11, in different concentrations as well as the effect of various parameters on their binding ability.

Design/methodology/approach

Capillary column gas chromatography was used for the determination of lactones and the manual system was used for taking samples and for headspace analysis. Infrared spectroscopy was used for confirmation and investigation.

Findings

The percentage of binding of lactones γ‐9, γ‐10, δ‐10, δ‐11 on the soya protein is almost the same (about 33‐34 per cent). According to the Klotz equation, the bound ligand concentration was calculating as the number of moles of ligand bound per mole of protein. The results varied, but were similar. Specific experiments in water system with soya protein isolate (1 per cent) showed that the time taken for lactones γ‐10 and δ‐11 to reach equilibrium, the factors of temperature and pH affected the percentage of lactone bound.

Research limitations/implications

The amount of added lactone in products containing soya protein isolate should be investigated by using panel tests to confirm the improvement of flavour.

Practical implications

Flavour binding of lactones can be used to provide some foods with the required flavour impression by adding lactones to a bland soy protein base.

Originality/value

The flavour binding of lactones, which was investigated in the present paper, has not been adequately investigated in previous scientific research and the effects of the factors that influence their binding are very important.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Mark Partridge and Denis J. Murphy

A selection of organic/health foods containing soya beans was tested for the presence of genetically modified (GM) material. Out of 25 samples of food products containing…

1791

Abstract

A selection of organic/health foods containing soya beans was tested for the presence of genetically modified (GM) material. Out of 25 samples of food products containing unrefined soya ingredients, ten tested positively for the presence of GM material. This was surprising because eight out of the ten GM‐positive samples were either labelled as “GM free” and/or were labelled as “organic”, both of which imply the absence of GM ingredients. In no case did any of the foods tested reach the mandatory 1 per cent threshold required for positive labelling as GM products under current European Union legislation, although one product was close to this limit. However, there was considerable batch‐to‐batch variation in the GM soya content of some of the food products, depending on the purchase date and retailer. The paper discusses the implications of these results regarding international regulations on food labelling and use of “GM free” labels or their equivalent.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Giovanni Aulisa, Claudio Binda, Elvira Padua, Antonio Pratesi, Alfonso Bellia, Chiara Bellia and Mauro Lombardo

This study aims to evaluate if soya consumption can compromise or positively influence the effects of the Mediterranean diet (MD).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate if soya consumption can compromise or positively influence the effects of the Mediterranean diet (MD).

Design/methodology/approach

A full literature review has been conducted as part of a proposal of a new point of view on the consumption of soya and its derivatives in areas where until a few decades ago this type of food did not exist at all.

Findings

There does not seem to be any contraindications for soy systematic use, therefore, excluding historical-geographical reasons, soya could be included in an MD without altering the benefits associated with it.

Practical implications

Soya is not advised as a typical food in the MD, but promoting its use could probably contribute to increase the variety of the diet and likely consolidates the positive health benefits characteristic of MD.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this review is one of the first to evaluate soybean consumption within the MD.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

At the commencement of this decade, leaving behind the “striking seventies”, we christened it the “anxious eighties”, for there was a profound disquiet and uncertainty…

Abstract

At the commencement of this decade, leaving behind the “striking seventies”, we christened it the “anxious eighties”, for there was a profound disquiet and uncertainty among most of the population, a fear that things were going to get worse, but they could have hardly expected the catastrophic events of the year 1981. The criteria of quality of life are its richness, grace, elegance; by the promise it contains; inspiration and purpose, hope, determination (to survive, to make certain that the evildoer is not permitted to succeed), love of one's country — pro patria, of other days.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Helen Wiseman

Dietary phytoestrogens are currently being extensively investigated because of the possibility that they may protect against disease. Soya isoflavones, in particular, are…

628

Abstract

Dietary phytoestrogens are currently being extensively investigated because of the possibility that they may protect against disease. Soya isoflavones, in particular, are attracting considerable attention because there is increasing evidence that they may protect against breast and prostate cancers and heart disease and osteoporosis. Considers the evidence for disease prevention by phytoestrogens and the biological mechanisms by which they may act. Explores dietary sources of phytoestrogens and the production of both traditional and non‐traditional soya foods. Considers the potential hazards of dietary phytoestrogens, including their use in infant formulas and associated, possibly harmful, developmental effects, and the possibility that they may display the harmful oestrogenic effects of oral contraceptives by increasing risk of deep vein thrombosis (blood clots). Finally, assesses the benefits versus the risk of dietary phytoestrogens.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 97 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1952

Since March 16th the ban on the use of soya in the manufacture of sausages has been removed. The lifting of this restriction, which has been in force since 1946, will be…

Abstract

Since March 16th the ban on the use of soya in the manufacture of sausages has been removed. The lifting of this restriction, which has been in force since 1946, will be welcomed by some manufacturers who claim that soya is an excellent binding agent. We are doubtful, however, whether these sentiments will be shared by all public analysts, many of whom are of the opinion that the presence of soya in a sausage renders the determination of the meat content if not wholly impossible at best a series of long and tedious processes, the accuracy of which would seem to be a matter of some controversy. Upon our enquiry about this divergency of opinion to the Ministry of Food, we were told that the Ministry were quite satisfied that the new Order could be properly enforced, in other words we assume this to mean that they consider the presence of soya does not prevent the accurate determination of the meat content. This was the answer one would expect to receive from the authority who framed the Meat Products Order, but it is none the less surprising to recall that only a very short while ago the Ministry were of the reverse opinion. In May 1950 a report was published in this Journal of a case heard before Old Street Magistrates. The defendants were summoned under The Meat Products, Canned Soup and Canned Meat (Control and Maximum Prices) Order, 1946, for selling sausages which contained soya. The Order stated that no persons should manufacture or sell any sausage, slicing sausage or sausage meat which to his knowledge contained any soya product. The prosecuting solicitor, for the Ministry of Food, said that it was necessary under the Order of 1946 for sausages to contain a minimum meat content, and if soya flour were used to bind the sausage it was not possible upon analysis to determine the meat content. It would be interesting to know whether the results of research during the past two years have made available new and efficient methods of examination which justify this change of viewpoint. We are advised, however, that if soya is present the amount of meat cannot be accurately assessed, and, moreover, the percentage error of this determination is likely to be directly related to the percentage of soya in the sausage. Thus it would seem possible that this new piece of legislation provides an added incentive to an unscrupulous manufacturer to prepare his mix with a lower meat content than that prescribed and to make up the balance with soya: a practice which would enable him to make more sausages than his honest competitor, and which would probably be difficult to expose.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Angie Jefferson

Interest into the role of dietary phytoestrogens and their potential effects on women’s health has dramatically increased over the past decade. Phytoestrogens, and in…

1137

Abstract

Interest into the role of dietary phytoestrogens and their potential effects on women’s health has dramatically increased over the past decade. Phytoestrogens, and in particular isoflavone‐rich soya foods, are now believed to play a role in alleviating symptoms of the menopause, maintaining bone density, reducing blood cholesterol levels, protecting against cancer development. In addition they exhibit potent antioxidant activities. Evidence is now sufficiently strong for both the US FDA and the UK JHCI to have approved use of food health claims for intakes of 25g soya protein daily, complete with their constituent isoflavones, for the reduction of blood cholesterol levels. This article reviews the main areas of evidence for the role of phytoestrogens in women’s health and practical approaches to increasing phytoestrogen‐rich foods in the daily diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Seok-Tyug Tan, Amin Ismail, Muhajir Hamid, Pei-Pei Chong, Jian Sun and Seok-Shin Tan

Literature has shown that phenolic acids and flavonoids are bearing with hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic properties. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature has shown that phenolic acids and flavonoids are bearing with hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic properties. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the possibility of phenolic-rich soya bean husk powder extract (SHPE) in combating diabetes and obesity using in vitro models.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypoglycemic properties were evaluated by determining the ability of SHPE (25-100 µg/mL) in inhibiting a-amylase and a-glucosidase enzymes and in triggering insulin secretion in BRIN-BD11 cells. Murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes were used for evaluating the anti-adipogenic properties of SHPE through the determination of relative lipid accumulation, triglyceride content and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity.

Findings

The hypoglycemic properties of SHPE was in the dose-dependent manner, where 100 µg SHPE/mL exhibited a significant higher (p < 0.05) a-amylase inhibitory activity (56.8 ± 0.11 per cent) and insulin secretion activity (0.73 ± 0.02 µg/l) against other concentrations. In contrast to the aforementioned findings, a significant lower a-glucosidase inhibitory activity (52.0 ± 0.44 per cent) was also observed in 100 µg SHPE/mL. Nevertheless, findings revealed that all the SHPE were able to inhibit the activity of a-amylase and a-glucosidase and stimulated the insulin secretion in BRIN-BD11 cells. On the other hand, the anti-adipogenic properties of SHPE were in the reverse dose-dependent manner, where 100 µg SHPE/mL demonstrated a significant lower (p < 0.05) relative lipid accumulation (48.5 ± 0.03 per cent), intracellular triglyceride content (5.7 ± 0.07 mg/dL) and GPDH activity (1.0 ± 0.01 mU/mL). These findings reflected that 100 µg SHPE/mL was a potent anti-adipogenic agent when compared with other concentrations. In conclusion, soya husk could emerge as a potential hypoglycemic and anti-adipogenic agents in in vitro models.

Originality/value

This was the first study to explore the effectiveness of phytochemicals derived from soya bean husk in ameliorating hyperglycemia and adipogenesis. Promising findings that derived from the present study could enable the scientists to re-evaluate the potential use of agricultural wastes, especially in the formulation of nutraceuticals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Veer Pal Singh, Vikas Pathak, Narendra Kumar Nayak and Sanjay Kumar Bharti

This purpose of this paper was to conduct a study with an aim to reduce the cost of chicken nuggets by replacing part of lean meat with soy flakes. The suitability of…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper was to conduct a study with an aim to reduce the cost of chicken nuggets by replacing part of lean meat with soy flakes. The suitability of chilled paneer whey was also assessed in place of ice water.

Design/methodology/approach

In the development of chicken nuggets, water-soaked soya flakes at the rate of 20 per cent were used in the formulation. The chilled whey at the rate of 8 per cent of the formulation was used to prevent the rise of temperature during emulsion preparation.

Findings

The product prepared in this way gave 5 per cent more yield than normal preparation in which ice water was used. The protein content in the preparation had gone significantly (p < 0.05) higher and moisture significantly (p < 0.05) lower than the normal control. The other proximate composition of chicken nuggets like fat and ash revealed no significant (p > 0.05) change in the product. Initially, thiobarbituric acid value and pH were observed lower in soya flakes-extended nuggets than the control. The overall acceptability was higher, that might be due to good binding and proper emulsion preparations.

Research limitations/implications

Some experiments on amino acid profile and fatty acid profile are also required for further know-how about the actual nutritional status of chicken meat nuggets.

Practical implications

The products will be of immense value for the nutritional supplement and utilization of by-products like whey. It may also be a cost-effective formulation.

Social implications

The products will be acceptable to all commodities because it is made up of chicken meat.

Originality/value

The cost of the formulation was also lower than the chicken nuggets used without soya flakes and whey because cost of meat was greater than the soya. The whey produced in paneer production costs less or by-product rich in protein materials can be better utilized into valuable products. The developed product seems to have great applications in the food industry and acceptability among consumers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000