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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Bob Little

To illustrate the value of using a learning management system to streamline training administration tasks and, especially, to provide evidence of compliance for the

Abstract

Purpose

To illustrate the value of using a learning management system to streamline training administration tasks and, especially, to provide evidence of compliance for the authorities in regulated industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to this topic is via interviews with experts. Officials from five US‐based organisations – four health‐care and one pharmaceutical organisation – explain the value of a learning management system to their particular organisation. They also outline the additional benefits that they have experienced – such as medical staff being able to spend more time with patients. There are also comments from an industry analyst specialising in learning management systems.

Findings

Learning management systems not only enable training to be standardised and co‐ordinated within the largest and most fragmented organisations but also provide accurate records of learning and competence – which are vital in highly regulated industries.

Practical implications

These are that every organisation in a “regulated” industry – especially those in the health‐care sector – should use an enterprise‐wide learning management system to improve the efficiency of their staff training and development. Moreover, they should use the user‐monitoring and record‐keeping functions of the learning management system to keep automated, up‐to‐date records of knowledge, skills and competencies for that industry's regulatory bodies.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates – albeit anecdotally – the value of a learning management system, not just for the training function but also in operational terms. As such, it should be of interest not only to training and HR professionals but also to those responsible for organisational strategy, planning and operation.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Richard Dealtry

Experience shows that there are problems arising from the implementation of learning management systems (LMS). Indications are that they are too e‐learning technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Experience shows that there are problems arising from the implementation of learning management systems (LMS). Indications are that they are too e‐learning technology driven, emphasising the virtual component and neglecting the precursory development of a vibrant and committed formal learning organisation culture and infrastructure. This article aims to investigate the benefits of applying a constructivist methodology in the implementation of new LMS.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a reflective assessment on the benefits of applying a constructivist methodology when designing and implementing strategic new learning and knowledge‐based organisation development investments.

Findings

The paper reveals a corporate strategic learning management solution (SLMS) approach which is synthesised out of a successful macro‐educational intervention in the UK; that of the Foundation Degree Forward (fdf) initiative.

Originality/value

This process involves using a holistic stakeholder approach that connects with all the management, resourcing and underlying organisational activities which are essential for the creation of a well managed, cohesive and sustainable strategic learning intervention.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

B. Little

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Scott Wilson and Kamala Velayutham

The purpose of this paper is to explore technology strategies and policies in the areas of standards, repositioning of technology, and service‐oriented architecture that

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore technology strategies and policies in the areas of standards, repositioning of technology, and service‐oriented architecture that focus on enabling innovation while retaining coherence and viability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the concepts of shearing layers and Personal Learning Environments to define appropriate boundaries between individual, departmental, institutional, national, and global network control.

Findings

Education systems today can be characterised as a recursive metasystem of separate systems. Each system uses innovation as part of strategic planning to try to realise its potential and release its latency. However, these strategic activities generate friction with the metasystem, which puts the brakes on innovation in its subsystems. The architectural concepts of shearing layers and flexible couplings provide a model for reducing this friction. One way of enabling shearing layers in educational technology is to offer polymodal access to services.

Research limitations/implications

In managing technology, institutions should actively consider relocating functions to other layers of the education system, including technologies owned by individual learners and teachers. They should think of technology in terms of supporting flexible shearing layers between rapidly changing organisational structures. The concept of polymodal access should be used when looking to deploy services at any level of the organisation. Critical cross‐cutting issues of privacy, identity, and business intelligence need to be designed into the institutional and departmental service infrastructure. Institutions should develop innovation‐oriented technology policies. At the department or course level, policies should also reflect the position of the organisation with regard to the equitable experience of education.

Originality/value

The approach outlined demonstrates that institutions have the capacity to reinvent their technology strategies and policies in such a way as to unlock innovation at the departmental and personal level, without creating a crisis in IT service management. On the other hand, it also shows that the PLE perspective needs to be balanced with a broader view of student disposition and institutional goals to become recognised as part of the institutional technology strategy and policies.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Bob Little

Businesses need to make money and/or save money if they want to be successful. Organisations are now realising that they can do both if they implement software systems

Abstract

Businesses need to make money and/or save money if they want to be successful. Organisations are now realising that they can do both if they implement software systems – known as learning management systems (LMS) – to collect and analyse data relating to the skills of their workforce. While, once, it was enough to have transferred some training materials from the classroom to CD‐ROM, people soon began to wonder whether anyone actually used the CD‐ROMs. With that realisation, the concept of a learning management system was born. One of the most advanced LMSs in the world – and a market leader, with some 2,500 users world‐wide – is the LMS produced by Pathlore. It lets companies plan, deliver and manage e‐learning, then assess learning performance by student, group, line of business or across the entire extended enterprise. The system also lets companies manage their organisational skills and competencies: employees assess themselves online and then go directly to prescribed online or classroom learning. Although this technology is not a panacea and will not pay dividends for every company, it can offer great benefits to those organisations with a large and/or widely geographically dispersed workforce.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Gavin W. Porter

Although multiple studies examine institutional transitions of learning management systems (LMS) or compare their merits, studies examining students' free choice of access…

Abstract

Purpose

Although multiple studies examine institutional transitions of learning management systems (LMS) or compare their merits, studies examining students' free choice of access on parallel LMSs for the same course are absent from the literature. In order to investigate usage in a free‐choice situation, identical content was posted at the same time to two different LMSs in a large enrollment class with a diversity of majors.

Design/methodology/approach

Two prevalent LMSs were utilized in the study: WebCT, which was in existence at a university‐wide level previously, and Moodle, which will become the new university‐wide system in the 2012‐13 academic year onwards. Both student self‐reports and LMS log usage data were analyzed. LMS preferences and usage groups were categorized.

Findings

Although this inquiry revealed that most students chose to use the WebCT system (85 per cent WebCT users, 15 per cent Moodle users; both self‐reported and log‐verified), the reasons given for WebCT preference pertained largely to habit and that most other courses are using the WebCT LMS. In contrast, the reasons given for using Moodle spoke directly to the attributes of the LMS itself, namely the interface quality and the way it is organized.

Originality/value

This study indicates that institutions should look beyond student usage patterns in making LMS choices, and that LMS quality is sometimes, and perhaps unfortunately, overshadowed by student habit and familiarity.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Devrim Ozdemir, Heather M. Opseth and Holland Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a process of faculty utilization of learning analytics by evaluating students’ course objective achievement results to enable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a process of faculty utilization of learning analytics by evaluating students’ course objective achievement results to enable student reflection, student remediation and faculty curriculum evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Upon the completion of a backward curriculum design process, the authors utilized learning analytics to improve advising, student reflection, remediation and curriculum evaluation. The learning management system incorporated the learning analytics tool to assist the learning analytics process. The course faculty, student advisors and students utilized the learning analytics throughout the academic year.

Findings

Unlike relying merely on student grades and other proxy indicators of learning, the learning analytics tool provided immediate and direct data to multiple stakeholders for advising, student reflection, student remediation and course curriculum evaluation. The authors believe it was a meaningful endeavor. It enabled meaningful conversations focusing on course learning objectives and provided detailed information on each student. The learning analytics tool also provided detailed information regarding which areas faculty needed to improve in the curriculum.

Originality/value

Most of the literature on learning analytics present the cases that administrators utilized learning analytics to make higher level decisions and researchers to explore the factors involved in learning. This paper provides cases to faculty regarding how learning analytics can benefit the faculty and the students.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

A.K.M. Najmul Islam and Nasreen Azad

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perceptions of educators and students with a learning management system (LMS). The comparison is based on survey data collected…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perceptions of educators and students with a learning management system (LMS). The comparison is based on survey data collected from 185 educators and 249 students in a Finnish university who use a popular LMS, Moodle.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of the survey data follows a two-phase strategy. In the first phase, perceptions of educators and students regarding ease of use, result demonstrability, usefulness, access, reliability, compatibility, satisfaction, and continuance intention were compared using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). In the second phase, partial least squares (PLS) technique is employed to compare the path values and explained variances of satisfaction, and continuance intention by putting relevant variables as predictors.

Findings

The ANOVA results suggest that students have higher positive perceptions regarding ease of use, usefulness, access, reliability, and compatibility of the LMS than the educators. The PLS analysis results revealed that the amount of variance of students’ satisfaction explained by its predictors was 9 percentage points lower than that of educators. It also revealed that the variance of students’ continuance intention explained by satisfaction and usefulness was 12 percentage points lower than that of educators.

Practical implications

The study concludes with both theoretical and managerial implications.

Originality/value

While prior research has investigated either educators’ or students’ perspective, the authors have investigated both and presented a comparison. The authors have reported several differences that help practitioners make customized intervention plan.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Shane Dawson, Liz Heathcote and Gary Poole

This paper aims to examine how effective higher education institutions have been in harnessing the data capture mechanisms from their student information systems, learning

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how effective higher education institutions have been in harnessing the data capture mechanisms from their student information systems, learning management systems and communication tools for improving the student learning experience and informing practitioners of the achievement of specific learning outcomes. The paper seeks to argue that the future of analytics in higher education lies in the development of more comprehensive and integrated systems to value add to the student learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature regarding the trend for greater accountability in higher education is reviewed in terms of its implications for greater “user driven” direction. In addition, IT usage within higher education and contemporary usage of data captured from various higher education systems is examined and compared to common commercial applications to suggest how higher education management and teachers can gain greater understanding of the student cohort and personalise and enhance the learning experience much as commercial entities have done for their client base. A way forward for higher education is proposed.

Findings

If the multiple means that students engage with university systems are considered, it is possible to track individual activity throughout the entire student life cycle – from initial admission, through course progression and finally graduation and employment transitions. The combined data captured by various systems builds a detailed picture of the activities students, instructors, service areas and the institution as a whole undertake and can be used to improve relevance, efficiency and effectiveness in a higher education institution.

Originality/value

The paper outlines how academic analytics can be used to better inform institutions about their students learning support needs. The paper provides examples of IT automation that may allow for student user‐information to be translated into a personalised and semi‐automated support system for students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Kyle M.L. Jones and Amy VanScoy

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how instructors discuss student data and information privacy in their syllabi.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how instructors discuss student data and information privacy in their syllabi.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected a mixture of publicly accessible and privately disclosed syllabi from 8,302 library and information science (LIS) courses to extract privacy language. Using privacy concepts from the literature and emergent themes, the authors analyzed the corpus.

Findings

Most syllabi did not mention privacy (98 percent). Privacy tended to be mentioned in the context of digital tools, course communication, policies and assignments.

Research limitations/implications

The transferability of the findings is limited because they address only one field and professional discipline, LIS, and address syllabi for only online and hybrid courses.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for professional development for instructors related to student data privacy. The discussion provides recommendations for creating educational experiences that support syllabi development and constructive norming opportunities.

Social implications

Instructors may be making assumptions about the degree of privacy literacy among their students or not value student privacy. Each raises significant concerns if privacy is instrumental to intellectual freedom and processes critical to the educational experience.

Originality/value

In an age of educational data mining and analytics, this is one of the first studies to consider if and how instructors are addressing student data privacy in their courses, and the study initiates an important conversation for reflecting on privacy values and practices.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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