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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Adrian Small, Petia Sice and Tony Venus

The purpose of this paper is to set out an argument for a way to design, implement and manage IS with an emphasis on first, the learning that can be created through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out an argument for a way to design, implement and manage IS with an emphasis on first, the learning that can be created through undertaking the approach, and second, the learning that may be created through using the IS that was implemented. The paper proposes joining two areas of research namely, technology management with soft systems methodology (SSM). The framework was developed through undertaking a customer concern management project within a manufacturing organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing the literature on information systems management, the learning organisation, and systems theory a proposed synergy is found. The outcome of this synergy allows a number of methodologies to be identified that are argued as suitable for IS design. From these information system development (ISD) methodologies, SSM is expanded to incorporate the principles of the learning organisation and systems theory. The expanded SSM framework is applied in practice through a process of participatory action research.

Findings

The outcome of the practical work argues for a complete framework that joins the areas of research (SSM and technology management) and emphasises other thinking from the areas of systems theory and the “learning organisation”.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes with a discussion on the advantages of joining soft systems with technology management but also the limitations created. Such limitations have been identified as moving from the soft, tacit issues of the design phases to the harder more structured aspects of technology implementation and management. A change in philosophy may restrict other issues from being explored. This issue needs to be focussed on in future research.

Practical implications

A framework has been developed that draws on the work of soft systems methodology (SSM) and a technology management process framework (TMPF) used in the area of technology management. By expanding the SSM model and joining it with the TMPF an attempt to give individuals and teams a practical tool to help design, implement, and manage IS with an emphasis on learning the framework promotes.

Originality/value

The framework provides advantages for academics, consultants and other practitioners and gives a central focus on what issues need to be accomplished more explicitly in order to undertake an ISD project.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Francisco José Fernández Cruz, Inmaculada Egido Gálvez and Rafael Carballo Santaolalla

Quality management systems are being used more frequently in educational institutions, although their application has generated a certain amount of disagreement among…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality management systems are being used more frequently in educational institutions, although their application has generated a certain amount of disagreement among education experts, who have at times questioned their suitability and usefulness for improving schools. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by providing additional knowledge on the effects in educational institutions of implementing quality management systems. Specifically, this study investigates teachers’ and managers’ perception of the impact that quality management systems have on one essential dimension of schools, the teaching–learning processes, with impact being understood as sustained medium- and long-term organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The responses were analysed and classified into a set of sub-dimensions linked to quality management processes in a total of 29 Spanish primary and secondary education schools that have used such systems for at least three years.

Findings

The results showed that, according to the respondents, the following sub-dimensions were improving as a result of implementing quality management plans: teaching and learning processes, the analysis of student results, tutoring, consideration of attitudes and values and assessment processes. Conversely, quality management systems did not seem to have a clear impact on the teaching methodologies used by teachers or on family involvement in student learning. In fact, the perceived impact in these sub-dimensions varied among teachers of public and private schools as well as when comparing different regional autonomous communities.

Originality/value

As the main objective of a school is to guarantee student learning, one of the essential purposes of school quality assurance systems is to perform all the activities aimed at ensuring high levels of student performance.

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Anastase Adonis and Khalil Drira

This paper aims to provide a methodological road for the next generation of e‐learning environments.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a methodological road for the next generation of e‐learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers a survey of recent publications (1995‐2002), which aim to provide practical and theoretical indications and advice, which are coupled with practical experimentations.

Findings

The paper provides road‐mapping elements, indicating the impact on services and systems to be expected by this design approach.

Research limitations/implications

The survey is based on a selection of sources and it is not exhaustive. The methodology experiments that are used for argumentation are based on the authors’ platform.

Practical implications

The paper presents a useful source of knowledge for researchers and advanced students.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a road for advanced e‐learning systems, and can help researchers and those in industry who desire to introduce and understand the design methodological context of advanced e‐learning systems.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Provides a detailed account of how a UK Primary Care Trust implemented a learning management system incorporating self‐service and e‐learning functionality.

Abstract

Purpose

Provides a detailed account of how a UK Primary Care Trust implemented a learning management system incorporating self‐service and e‐learning functionality.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study. Written by workforce planning manager for Hertfordshire PCTs who was intimately involved in the management of the e‐learning project. Provides a detailed account of how the learning and development team of the newly merged PCT implemented self‐service learning.

Findings

Imagine you are part of a learning and development team that has been given the responsibility for training 3,500 staff spread across more than 100 different locations. This was the task facing the 20‐strong team at the Hertfordshire Primary Care Trust. The formation of Primary Care Trusts marked a radical shift in how the NHS is organized and financed at primary care level; its aim was to improve the delivery and quality of primary care and to reduce costs. It has long been recognized that the extent to which this can be achieved depends almost exclusively on the levels of competence and skills shown by NHS workers. The merging in 2006 of Herfordshire's existing eight PCTs into two new PCTs under a shared management team provided the newly merged learning and development team with the chance to completely revamp the whole operation. They aimed to create a learning and development system with self‐service learning and e‐learning functionality that would be universally accessible to all those working in the newly created PCTs.

Practical implications

Provides a useful case study example of how to create a learning management system accessible to all and which was able to raise the profile of training within the organization; identifies the benefits for staff, management and organization.

Social implications

Describes how the learning management system was able to help maintain the quality of learning and development data for risk management and mandatory reporting.

Originality/value

Offers management an account of how one UK Trust implemented a learning management system that incorporated self‐service and e‐learning.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Bob Little

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of talent management systems and their evolving relationship with learning management systems (LMS

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of talent management systems and their evolving relationship with learning management systems (LMS) and learning content management systems (LCMS).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses factual reporting to provide the overview.

Findings

While the traditional LMS is in decline, the LCMS has much in common with – and can augment – a talent management system. Technological developments (cloud computing, PaaS and so on) are having an effect on these relationships.

Practical implications

Talent management systems are becoming increasingly important for would‐be successful large (especially multi‐national) companies. The capacity and the business requirements of the LMS are changing. The LCMS offers a number of advantages for the modern business over the LMS and can collaborate with a talent management system to achieve strategic business objectives. Competency data – and competency management – lie at the heart of building competitive advantage in the modern business world.

Originality/value

This is the first such analysis of the development of talent management systems and their evolving relationship with LMS and LCMS in relation to the corporate learning sector. This paper will be of interest to those looking for: a historical perspective on talent management system development; an explanation of talent management and its place within business strategy, and/or the latest technology developments (mid‐2010) in this sector.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Fotis Draganidis, Paraskevi Chamopoulou and Gregoris Mentzas

The purpose of this paper is to present a prototype ontology‐based application that has been developed for competency management and learning paths.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a prototype ontology‐based application that has been developed for competency management and learning paths.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview of competency management and related work in this area, a description of the competency ontology, and a functional and architectural analysis.

Findings

The paper provides information on work related to ontology‐based competency management systems, indicating an enhanced approach with a detailed analysis of system architecture and functional analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed application will be implemented through a .NET deployment, in Microsoft Hellas, the Greek subsidiary of the multinational IT company.

Originality/value

Ontologies have already been created in different scientific areas, including knowledge and competency management. However, only a few ontology‐based applications are available today within the domain of competency management. In this paper an ontology‐based application is presented has been developed for competency management and learning paths. Specifically, the paper provides an overview of competency management and related work in this area, a description of the competency ontology, and a functional and architectural analysis.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Shuang Geng, Lijing Tan, Ben Niu, Yuanyue Feng and Li Chen

Although digitalization in the workplace is burgeoning, tools are needed to facilitate personalized learning in informal learning settings. Existing knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

Although digitalization in the workplace is burgeoning, tools are needed to facilitate personalized learning in informal learning settings. Existing knowledge recommendation techniques do not account for dynamic and task-oriented user preferences. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new design of a knowledge recommender system (RS) to fill this research gap and provide guidance for practitioners on how to enhance the effectiveness of workplace learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs the design science research approach. A novel hybrid knowledge recommendation technique is proposed. An experiment was carried out in a case company to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system design. Quantitative data were collected to investigate the influence of personalized knowledge service on users’ learning attitude.

Findings

The proposed personalized knowledge RS obtained satisfactory user feedback. The results also show that providing personalized knowledge service can positively influence users’ perceived usefulness of learning.

Practical implications

This research highlights the importance of providing digital support for workplace learners. The proposed new knowledge recommendation technique would be useful for practitioners and developers to harness information technology to facilitate workplace learning and effect organization learning strategies.

Originality/value

This study expands the scope of research on RS and workplace learning. This research also draws scholarly attention to the effective utilization of digital techniques, such as a RS, to support user decision making in the workplace.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Shin‐Yuan Hung, Charlie C. Chen and Wan‐Ju Lee

Medical errors cause a significant number of deaths. Providing training to medical staff can improve the quality of medical care. Hospitals have traditionally used…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical errors cause a significant number of deaths. Providing training to medical staff can improve the quality of medical care. Hospitals have traditionally used face‐to‐face modality to train staff but they are beginning to adopt e‐learning systems that can easily deliver training at work or to other convenient locations. The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors leading to e‐learning adoption in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework of factors leading to the adoption decision of e‐learning systems is first proposed. Survey data are collected to empirically test the proposed framework. The samples consist of senior executives and managers in hospitals.

Findings

It is found that three factors including managerial, organizational, and technological exhibit significant influences on the adoption decision. One novel result is that the organizational variable of hospital specialization significantly influences the decision to adopt e‐learning systems.

Research limitations/implications

This study is one of the first to propose a model of adoption of e‐learning specifically in the context of hospitals. Limitations and strengths of the study and possible future research direction are also discussed.

Practical implications

From a practitioner's standpoint, the results of this study can help hospital administrators to accelerate the adoption of e‐learning systems.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to propose a model of adoption of e‐learning specifically in the context of hospitals. It is expected that the model developed can assist to further understand the e‐learning adoption in hospitals.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Nekane Aramburu, Josune Sáenz and Olga Rivera

The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, an ad hoc questionnaire was devised and addressed to the Chief Executive Officers of a representative sample of 200 companies from all manufacturing sectors of the Basque Country.

Findings

The results obtained show that the characteristics of the management system of a company (the strategy formulation process and organizational design) do not condition the learning level that can be attained as a result of an experience of concrete change. However, it is true that companies which have experienced changes in which a high level of learning has been achieved have adapted their management systems more according to what theorists deem appropriate to help future learning.

Originality/value

The research carried out allows a better practical knowledge of the existing relationship between management systems, change processes, and levels of organizational learning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Tariq Mahmood and Khalid Hafeez

The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance of an e‐learning software system to ensure its teaching and learning quality, contextual relevance and longer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance of an e‐learning software system to ensure its teaching and learning quality, contextual relevance and longer operational life to achieve economies of scale.

Design/methodology/approach

A Goal‐Question‐Metric (GQM) paradigm along with the ISO 9126 quality characteristics is proposed to assess performance of an in‐house e‐learning software system in terms of its functionality, usability, efficiency and effectiveness. The e‐learning software system was designed and implemented for teaching staff of developing countries attending the T&L “train the trainer” course at the Colombo Plan Staff College (CPSC), Manila, Philippines. The data were collected from the participants from 20 countries who attended the program over a period of three years.

Findings

The approach was very effective for assessing and evaluating various functions of the web‐based teaching and learning software system and assessing its suitability in teaching and learning, and interaction among the users. The findings were utilized to further improve the management and quality of the training program.

Research limitations/implications

Commitment and participation of stakeholders/users is required to appropriately define the assessment goals, generate underlying questions that define those goals, and identify the metrics that provide answers to those questions. The research has limitations similar to any other questionnaire based subjective data collection method, much relying upon the respondent judgments. Therefore, a sound mechanism for data collection, validation and analysis needs to be employed to ensure internal consistency and accuracy.

Social implications

Many e‐learning software systems are accessed across the globe and are utilized by a number of institutions simultaneously while crossing over national and geographical boundaries. Therefore, performance assessment based on different ethical and social values and language barriers, to meet the clientele requirements belonging to different social backgrounds, is essential. Also this research provides many guidelines to reduce the customization requirements for different nationalities, and therefore, makes overall implementation of the learning management system more efficient and cost effective.

Originality/value

Due to the generic nature of GQM approach, this framework can be applied to undertake performance assessment of an in‐house built, web‐based teaching and learning system using the selected ISO 9126 quality characteristics to ensure the appropriateness, longevity and sustainability of the learning system.

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