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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

B.I.O. Ade‐Omowaye, S.A. Olaniyan, I.A. Adeyemi and O.O. Isola

This paper sets out to focus on the utilization of the locally available raw material to develop an acceptable and high quality non‐alcoholic beverage in Nigeria.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to focus on the utilization of the locally available raw material to develop an acceptable and high quality non‐alcoholic beverage in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Maize‐based non‐alcoholic beverages were produced from either plain maize powder or combinations of maize powder and mango or soybean flour. Plain and fruit or soy‐ fortified maize powders were analyzed using standard methods for chemical composition, while total solid, sediment height, pH, titratable acidity, storage stability and microbial load were determined on the formulated beverage products. Taste panel evaluation was conducted to evaluate the acceptability of the products.

Findings

While the protein, fat and ash contents of plain maize powder were 5.69, 5.95 and 0.35 per cent respectively, there was minimal enhancement with fruit addition. However, with 10 per cent soybean addition significant improvement over the unfortified sample in protein (14.62 per cent), fat (10.64 per cent) and ash (0.96 per cent) was obtained. Sediment height was found to be higher for beverage with sour water and least for soy‐fortified beverage. Titratable acidity of beverage samples was found to be 0.022, 0.018, 0.054 and 0.306 per cent (per cent lactic acid) for plain, fruit‐flavoured, soy‐fortified and soured beverages respectively. Variation in titratable acidity was observed depending on the product and storage condition. Sensory evaluation result for beverage prepared with sour water (0–100 per cent) revealed preference for soured beverage with 80 per cent sour water. Also, fruit‐flavoured sample ranked highest in preference followed closely by the plain beverage, while soy‐fortified sample was the least acceptable.

Originality/value

The paper has demonstrated the feasibility of developing acceptable beverage samples from sour water (a by‐product of Ogi usually regarded as waste) and combinations of either maize powder and mango or soybean flour.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

B.A. Akinwande, O.A. Abiodun and I.A. Adeyemi

The aim of the study is to compare the effect of steaming method and time on the physico‐chemical properties of underutilized Dioscorea dumetorum with three more commonly consumed…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to compare the effect of steaming method and time on the physico‐chemical properties of underutilized Dioscorea dumetorum with three more commonly consumed Dioscorea rotundata, Dioscorea cayenensis and Dioscorea alata.

Design/methodology/approach

Raw and pre‐gelatinized flour were produced from the yam species. Pre‐gelatinization was done by steaming diced cubes in autoclave at 68,950 Nm‐2 for 5 min and in Barlett steamer at 98±2°C for 10, 20 and 30 min. Flour samples were analyzed for amylose content, swelling index, consistency, solubility, water absorption capacity, and iodine affinity for starch.

Findings

The physico‐chemical properties of the flours were affected by both species and steaming time. Pre‐gelatinization of the tuber reduced amylose content in all the yam species, which reduced further with increase in steaming time. Except for amylose content and iodine affinity for starch, D. dumetorum compared with D. rotundata and D. cayenensis in the parameters that were measured. Samples autoclaved for 5 min had value similar to those steamed in Barlett steamer for 10 and 20 min for all the parameters that were measured, except consistency.

Practical implications

It is very important to encourage the cultivation and utilization of D. dumetorum because of the high yield and nutritional composition to enhance the nutritional and financial well‐being of the populace.

Originality/value

Pre‐gelatinization is important as pre‐treatment for yam tubers. Underutilized D. dumetorum could be useful in ingredient formulation for product development, especially as a thickening agent.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

B.I.O. Ade‐Omowaye, A.M. Adegbite, B.R. Adetunji and O.O. Oladunmoye

This paper focuses on the effect of different pretreatments on some properties of tigernut, an underutilized crop in Nigeria with the aim of widening its utilization in the…

381

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on the effect of different pretreatments on some properties of tigernut, an underutilized crop in Nigeria with the aim of widening its utilization in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

Tigernuts were subjected to various pretreatments such as fermentation, germination, pregelatinization and roasting before drying at 50 ± 2 C for 48 h in locally fabricated cabinet drier and milling in commercial plate mill to produce meal which passed through 30 mm pore‐sized sieve. Pretreated and untreated tigernut meals were analyzed using methods reported in the literature for chemical composition, physicochemical and functional properties.

Findings

Protein content of the meals ranged from 2.79 ± 0.01 to 3.65 ± 0.02 per cent with sample from fermented tigernut having the highest value and those from roasted ones having the least value. There were slight variations in the crude fat, fiber and ash contents of the resultant meals after pretreatment. There were 10 and 14 per cent enhancement in the ascorbic acid contents of fermented and germinated meals respectively. Titratable acidity, pH and water absorption capacity were affected by pretreatment in this study. Bulk density varied slightly after pretreatment. Germination, roasting and pregelatinization resulted in marked decrease in peak viscosity of the samples. The emulsion capacity ranged from 48.4 to 56 per cent with the untreated sample having the highest value and meals from roasted sample had the least value. Foaming capacity was improved by the pretreatments with the exception of roasting which reduced it from 2.15 to 1.18 per cent.

Originality/value

The paper has demonstrated the effect of pretreatments on tigernut meals and its potential applications in various food formulation and development, e.g. weaning foods, baked goods, beverage products, etc.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

E.T. Otunola and R.S. Ogunbiyi

The aim of the paper is to evaluate the microbiological and physico‐chemical characteristics of fermented pounded yam, a unique and popular food of the Igbominas of Nigeria.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to evaluate the microbiological and physico‐chemical characteristics of fermented pounded yam, a unique and popular food of the Igbominas of Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Fresh pounded yam was prepared in the laboratory by a modification of the traditional method, and then fermented for varying periods of time (0‐96hrs), also essentially by the traditional method. Analysis was carried out on the products following documented and established procedures.

Findings

Data obtained indicated noticeable increases in the populations of all the groups of microorganisms investigated with increases in fermentation time, except coliforms which declined in population after 24 hours. Heating of the samples after each fermentation interval resulted in significant reductions in microbial populations such that coliforms could not even be detected after 24 hours of fermentation. Lactic acid production, an indication of flavour development, and pH drop were highest at 48 hours of fermentation. The samples also became softer with increases in fermentation period. The heated samples were considered safe microbiologically, since they contained neither coliforms nor faecal coliforms.

Research limitations/implications

The consumption of fermented pounded yam is encouraged since it is safe microbiologically and develops a desired flavour, while further research should be carried out on the nutritional benefits.

Practical implications

The findings here suggested that adequate heating after fermentation is necessary to eliminate any potential microbial contamination, and for full flavour development.

Originality/value

The results of this research contribute to the knowledge of fermented foods, especially those that are indigenous to Nigeria and West Africa.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims to investigate and compare how operational knowledge is integrated into the design of buildings and large ships, focussing on the roles affiliation and the competences of the client’s project manager play.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional qualitative methodology with multiple case studies (five cases) was used. In addition, ten expert interviews and two validation focus group interviews were conducted. Case studies included in-depth interviews, document analysis and observations.

Findings

The study showed that organisational affiliation, focus and competences of the client’s project management play an important role in how much effort and resources go into ensuring integration of operational knowledge in the design process. In the ship cases, projects managers’ highest concerns were operations. Yet, the fewest procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were found implemented in these cases. Contrastingly, in the building cases, where operations were not the main matter of concern of project management, a large number of procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were implemented.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this research is the first to compare how integration of operational knowledge is taking place in the design process of buildings and large ships and identifying what these industries can learn from each other. Furthermore, it adds to the limited research on operations in large ship design.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Osaretin Albert T. Ebuehi and Abosede Christiana Oyewole

The objective of this study is to ascertain the effect of cooking and soaking on the physical characteristics, nutrient composition and sensory evaluation of an indigenous “ofada”…

638

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to ascertain the effect of cooking and soaking on the physical characteristics, nutrient composition and sensory evaluation of an indigenous “ofada” rice and a foreign “aroso” rice varieties in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The two rice varieties were freshly purchased in the raw state, soaked in water and cooked. The physical characteristics, such as length, width, weight, colour, purity, breakage, cooking time, dispersability and swelling capacity of the raw rice varieties were determined according to official methods. The raw, soaked and cooked rice varieties were oven‐dried at 60C for 4 h and milled to obtain a uniform surface area. The proximate composition and some minerals of the raw, soaked and cooked rice varieties and the sensory evaluation of the cooked rice were determined. Findings–The physical characteristics showed that “ofada” and “aroso” rice varieties were brown and creamy in colour, respectively. There were significant (p<0.01) differences in the purity, breakage, cooking time, swelling capacity and weight of the whole grain, but no difference in the length and width. The raw, cooked and soaked “ofada” rice contain more protein, fat, and fibre, than in “aroso” rice, but with no change in carbohydrate content. There were no significant (p>0.01) differences in the levels of minerals, Ca, Fe, Mg and P, in raw, cooked and soaked “ofada” and “aroso” rice. Sensory evaluation showed that cooked aroso rice was generally preferred, in terms of colour, aroma, taste, texture and overall acceptability.

Originality/value

The methods employed in this study are very simple and the two rice varieties are readily available, acceptable to local tastes and widely consumed in Nigeria. The local or indigenous “ofada” rice is compared favourably with a foreign and imported parboiled “aroso” rice. It is therefore possible for small scale and cottage industries to embark on commercial production and fortification of the local rice varieties in Nigeria.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Michael Ayodele Idowu, Kazeem Iroko, Abiodun Aderoju Adeola, Isaac Babatunde Oluwalana, Jerome Ayokunle Ayo and Damilola Shayo Ikuomola

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate some common bread improvers (normally used for 100 per cent wheat bread) for their effect on the quality attributes of wheat-cassava…

156

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate some common bread improvers (normally used for 100 per cent wheat bread) for their effect on the quality attributes of wheat-cassava (90:10) composite bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Four commonly used bread improvers (ASA, ABT, EDC and PTB) in Nigeria were evaluated for their effect on the baking potential of wheat-cassava (90:10) composite flour. Bread samples were baked from wheat-cassava (90:10) composite flour, with and without bread improvers. Changes in dough height during fermentation, oven spring, yield and specific volume of bread samples were determined. Bread samples were also evaluated for their sensory and staling characteristics.

Findings

Results showed that dough height during fermentation did not change significantly (p<0.05) and crumb colour, firmness, taste and aroma were unaffected by addition of bread improvers; but oven spring, yield, specific volume, bread shape, crust colour, texture and overall acceptability of bread were significantly different (p>0.05). All the bread improvers except ABT extended the shelf life of wheat-cassava (90:10) composite bread for a period of 24-48 hours.

Practical implications

Bread improvers normally used for 100 per cent wheat bread could be used effectively for wheat-cassava (90:10) composite bread without an adverse effect on quality of bread.

Originality/value

Bread makers need little or no additional training to handle wheat-cassava (90:10) composite flour for bread making process hence, Nigeria can sustain her policy of using wheat-cassava composite flour for baking without any serious technical problem.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

B.A. Akinwande, B.I.O. Ade‐Omowaye, S.A. Olaniyan and O.O. Akintaro

This study aimed at the potential use of ginger‐flavoured soy‐cassava flour to produce high‐protein biscuits.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at the potential use of ginger‐flavoured soy‐cassava flour to produce high‐protein biscuits.

Design/methodology/approach

Preparation of biscuit was done using soy‐cassava flour blends (0:100, 20:80, 30:70 and 40:60 w/w). Biscuit was also prepared from 100 per cent wheat flour to serve as control.

Findings

Chemical analysis indicated that the substitution of soy flour into cassava flour augmented the nutrient content of the biscuit, which indicates a good potential for meeting the nutrient requirements of school children. The use of ginger powder as flavouring agent effectively masked the beany flavour that is normally associated with soybean products. A sensory evaluation also confirmed good aroma and positive acceptability.

Originality/value

The findings in this study confirms the endless possibilities of protein enrichment of cassava flour for the production of biscuits as a potentially effective strategy for enhancing protein‐energy balance in children, particularly in developing countries. The value of this study lies in its potential as a product development strategy in combating protein‐energy malnutrition, thereby promoting good health, labour productivity and mental development.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Wasiu A.O. Afolabi, Clara R.B. Oguntona and Bilkisu B. Fakunmoju

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming…

Abstract

Reports a study to determine the suitability of beniseed for bread making as well as the chemical composition and acceptability of the bread among Nigerian bread consuming population. Three bread samples were developed from wheat, beniseed, and cassava composite flour using the formulae 85:10:5, 80:15:5 and 75:25:5. Baking characteristics, chemical composition and acceptability tests were carried out on the samples with wheat bread serving as control. Results show that bread produced from beniseed composite flour has similar baking characteristics in terms of appearance, colour and flavour when compared with wheat bread. Consumer acceptability tests indicated that the bread samples were all acceptable, with the sample with formula 85:10:5 ranked first and being the most preferred. Analysis of chemical composition indicated that the bread samples contain higher protein, fat, crude fibre and ash. This study has shown that acceptable bread of higher nutritional value can be produced from beniseed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Argaw Tarekegn Gurmu

The main objective of this research is to identify the most important human resource management (HRM) practices, which have the potential to enhance labour productivity using…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this research is to identify the most important human resource management (HRM) practices, which have the potential to enhance labour productivity using fuzzy synthetic evaluation approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a mixed-methods research design in which qualitative data were collected and analysed during Phase I and quantitative data were analysed during Phase II. Nineteen experts who have experience in building construction projects were involved in interviews conducted in Phase I. During Phase II, quantitative data were collected from contractors that were involved in the delivery of building projects using questionnaires and the data were analysed using FSE technique.

Findings

Clear delegation of responsibility, stability of organisational structure and crew composition are found to be the three most important HRM practices that can enhance productivity in building construction projects. The findings of the study showed that the overall importance index computed using the FSE model is 3.65 (≈ 4) with an equivalent linguistic term of “very important”. The study also suggested that the top three HRM practices should be implemented conjointly as there is no significant difference among their weights.

Originality/value

The output of this research can provide important information regarding the HRM practices in the Australian construction industry. Thus, international developers or contractors who want to do construction business in Australia can implement the essential HRM practices so that the productivity of their construction projects will not be affected negatively.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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