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1 – 10 of 531
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Miguel Moital, Julie Whitfield, Caroline Jackson and Arjun Bahl

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding event sponsorship activity, perceptions of event sponsorship, motives to sponsor, form of investment and structure of sponsorship was obtained from a sample of 61 drinks producers in India through a questionnaire. Mann‐Whitney and logistic regression were employed to compare the alcoholic and the non‐alcoholic sectors.

Findings

The results suggest that the alcohol and non‐alcohol drinks sectors sponsored a similar level of events, but in investment volume terms, sponsorship from the non‐alcoholic sector is far greater than that of the alcoholic sector. While the two sectors are similar in many ways, the emphasis placed on certain motives for sponsoring events was different, with alcoholic drinks businesses placing greater importance on reaching niche audiences and increasing media coverage than non‐alcoholic ones.

Research limitations/implications

A limited number of areas of the sponsorship decision‐making were covered, yet the study provides insights into the decision making of one of the key sponsoring industries: the drinks industry.

Practical implications

Securing sponsorship is becoming more difficult and complex. By understanding how sponsors make decisions, including potential variations between companies within an industry, event organisers will be in a better position to tailor sponsorship proposals, enhancing the likelihood of obtaining the desired sponsorship contracts.

Originality/value

Most sponsor decision‐making research focuses on how sponsorship decisions can be improved so that they work better for the sponsor. This paper, in contrast, emphasises that by understanding how clients make decisions (i.e. sponsors), sellers (i.e. the sponsored) will be in a better position to win over competition and secure the desired sponsorship deals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Marie-Louise Fry

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how members of an online alcohol reduction community learn, construct and engage in alcohol reduction consumption consistencies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how members of an online alcohol reduction community learn, construct and engage in alcohol reduction consumption consistencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Blog data from 15 individuals participating in the online community of Hello Sunday Morning were collected and analysed. Informants also participated in a series of in-depth interviews to gain a self-reflective perspective of alcohol reduction action, activities and interactions.

Findings

The findings indicate learning of new alcohol reduction consumption consistencies occurs through three modes or learning infrastructures: engagement, imagination and alignment, enabling a collective sense of connection in the creation of new alcohol-related rituals and traditions, competency of practices and transmission of values and norms beyond the community.

Research limitations/implications

The results underscore the need for social marketers to recognise learning of alcohol reduction behaviour is continually negotiated and dynamically engendered through socially reproduced conditions, responses and relationships.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the transformational potential of social marketing situating behaviour change as a social interaction between actors within a dynamic market system.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1966

WORDS, like currency, are easily debased. They lose their value when used out of context, invoked as a talisman or, without attention to their precise meaning, pressed…

Abstract

WORDS, like currency, are easily debased. They lose their value when used out of context, invoked as a talisman or, without attention to their precise meaning, pressed into service as a political shibboleth.

Details

Work Study, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Niraj Kumar and Subhajyoti Ray

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to investigate consumption patterns, attitudes, and socio-demographic profiles of college-attending respondents between the ages of 18 and 30. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the attitudes among young consumers towards soft drinks. A logistic regression model was used as a predictor to distinguish between frequent and non-frequent soft drink consumers.

Findings

Indian youths preferred diet drinks and fruit juices more than regular soft drinks. Soft drinks were mostly consumed as distinct drinks (not as substitutes) and on specific occasions. Easy availability of soft drinks at the locations closure to consumers was a critical factor in determining consumers’ purchase and consumption level. Attitude towards the utility and nutritional dimensions of soft drinks had a positive and significant influence on the frequency of consumption.

Practical implications

To remain competitive, soft drinks’ companies need to focus more on healthy products and those that are refreshing and relaxing.

Social implications

Regulating the availability of soft drinks in and around educational institutions will affect consumption of soft drinks and reduce diseases.

Originality/value

Only a few studies investigating consumption patterns and attitudes among Indian youth towards soft drinks. This study attempts to fill the gap.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Biswanath Dutta, USASHI CHATTERJEE and Devika P. Madalli

This paper aims to propose a brand new ontology development methodology, called Yet Another Methodology for Ontology (YAMO) and demonstrate, step by step, the building of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a brand new ontology development methodology, called Yet Another Methodology for Ontology (YAMO) and demonstrate, step by step, the building of a formally defined large-scale faceted ontology for food.

Design/methodology/approach

YAMO is motivated by facet analysis and an analytico-synthetic classification approach. The approach ensures quality of the system precisely; it makes the system flexible, hospitable, extensible, sturdy, dense and complete. YAMO consists of two-way approaches: top-down and bottom-up. Based on YAMO, domain food, formally defined as large-scale ontology, is designed. To design the ontology and to define the scope and boundary of the domain, a group of people were interviewed to get a practical overview, which provided more insight to the theoretical understanding of the domain.

Findings

The result obtained from evaluating the ontology is a very impressive one. Based on the study, it was found that 94 per cent of the user’s queries were successfully met. This shows the efficiency and effectiveness of the YAMO methodology. An evaluator opined that the ontology is very deep and exhaustive.

Practical implications

The authors envision that the current work will have great implications on ontology developers and practitioners. YAMO will allow ontologists to construct a very deep, high-quality and large-scale ontology.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates a brand new ontology development methodology and demonstrates how the methodology can be applied to build a large-scale high-quality domain ontology.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Faisal Shahzad, Jamshed Khan Khattak, Mobeen Jamshed Khattak and Fahad Shahzad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been considered but it is important to understand whether the extent of consumer socialization in terms of soft drink consumption influences consumer behavior by taking into consideration consumer cohorts.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research is based on consumer survey method by using Likert scale questionnaire. Convenience sampling technique with a sample size of 637 is used. Data are analyzed by using cronbach α, ANOVA, correlation and multiple regressions.

Findings

Overall, the findings maintain the impact of consumer socialization on soft drink consumption. Such influence of consumer socialization through social media, cultural groups and social groups encourages soft drink socialization behavior. Additionally there is also an evidence of mediating role of consumer generational behavior in soft drink consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper extend knowledge of how consumer socialization affects soft drink consumption behavior and provide important insights into how consumer cohorts should be targeted. The Chosen research approach is a limitation of the study.

Practical implications

The results are of value to academic researchers, soft drink industry practitioners in a way that it will help them to portray marketing and advertising activities by taking into consideration consumer cohorts behavior.

Social implications

This paper addresses an untapped issue on how cohorts socialization at different social setting impact on consumer soft drink consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a recognized need to study soft drink socialization in terms of cohort’s behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Anis Najiha Ahmad, Tajul A. Yang and Wan Nadiah Wan Abdullah

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on alcohol (alcoholic drinks and ethanol).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional descriptive survey, using quantitative research methods, was utilized. A self-administered survey was distributed to 188 undergraduate students of the food technology programme at Universiti Sains Malaysia, and a total of 114 responses were obtained.

Findings

Results indicate that respondents believed that they have above average competence regarding the concept, sources, ingredients, processing and the overall production of halal foods (score: 3.75-4.18). In addition, all of the 114 respondents also agreed that alcoholic drinks are fundamentally prohibited in Islam. However, the survey also revealed that the respondents were less certain about the application of alcohol in halal food production. Respondents’ actual knowledge on these issues was low to average.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by its cross-sectional nature. In addition, the research was only conducted on undergraduate-level students of the food technology programme, and therefore, results derived might not be generalized to the other segments of the population. The overall uncertainty and misconception about the application of alcohol in halal food highlights the need to improve the knowledge of these undergraduate students to more than a mere theory of the concepts of halal and haram.

Originality/value

No previous study has been conducted to explore the issue pertaining to alcohol in halal food, and this paper categorically strives to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Ana M. García Pérez, M. Ángeles Sanfiel Fumero and Juan Ramón Oreja Rodríguez

The objective of this study is to identify firms with a greater propensity to establish interorganisational relationships, as well as which value‐chain activities are…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to identify firms with a greater propensity to establish interorganisational relationships, as well as which value‐chain activities are affected by these relationships in the Canary Islands' food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The firms are grouped into large firms and small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), given the different resource endowments and dependencies of these two groups. Differences in the degree of flexibility or rigidity of their interorganisational relationships and in the activities affected by these relationships were expected. The fieldwork used a survey of the managers of a representative sample of 201 food firms, and univariate analysis statistical techniques were used to handle the data.

Findings

The paper finds that only 53 sample firms have developed interorganisational relationships, and 62.5 per cent of these are large firms. The flexible interorganisational link predominates. With regard to the value‐chain activities affected by these relationships, the most prominent are distribution and supplies, although size only has a statistically significant relation with some support activities.

Research limitations/implications

The small proportion of food firms that have carried out interorganisational links in the Canaries means that the findings obtained cannot be entirely generalisable to the rest of the firms in the sector.

Practical implications

Most studies of the food industry take a macroeconomic approach, and research taking a strategic and interorganisational perspective is scarce.

Originality/value

This type of study centring on this particular strategic behaviour has not been carried out before in the Canary Islands.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

H. Gerhardy, R.K. Hutchins and D.W. Marshall

Examines the usefulness of socio‐economic criteria for explainingfood consumption. Data from a sample of 102 households in the Newcastleupon Tyne area were collected by…

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Abstract

Examines the usefulness of socio‐economic criteria for explaining food consumption. Data from a sample of 102 households in the Newcastle upon Tyne area were collected by means of a food diary instrument. Considers 27 food groups. Demonstrates that few significant differences in consumption exist for households with and without children. Fewer differences exist for households in different social classes, households of differing education levels and households in different age groups.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

Jim Lowe

With its heavy dependence on independent food retailers, the cash and carry sector has seen little overall growth in recent years. A number of operators have experienced…

Abstract

With its heavy dependence on independent food retailers, the cash and carry sector has seen little overall growth in recent years. A number of operators have experienced severe pressure on net margins, and rationalisation and reorganisation have speeded up, especially with loosely organised groupings of wholesalers. What prospects for growth does the CandC sector show? This article looks at current problems and how the major companies are formulating their strategies for the future. Will this large sector — still with sales of over £3,000m, continue to suffer at the hands of the multiple food retailer? Are there enough new markets in terms of products or customers? And will we see an increasing dilution of genuine wholesaling to bulk buying by consumers?

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

1 – 10 of 531