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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Philip Tice

Metal cans are extensively used, in the retail distribution of foods and beverages, where packaging is required to be both robust and able to withstand sterilisation…

Abstract

Metal cans are extensively used, in the retail distribution of foods and beverages, where packaging is required to be both robust and able to withstand sterilisation temperatures. Internal lacquer barrier coatings on the cans play an important role in maintaining the quality of the contents, by preventing any unacceptable metal contamination. It is, however, necessary to ensure that the presence of the lacquer does not itself make the contents unsafe. As yet, the European Commission has produced no directive relating specifically to safety rules for contact between foodstuffs and polymeric or plastic coatings on metal substrates (e.g. lacquer‐coated cans). It is therefore necessary to turn to individual national laws and regulations, or the Council of Europe Resolution on Coatings, for assurance on the safety of lacquer‐coated food and beverage cans. Discusses existing EC food contact legislation, and its possible future application to lacquer‐coated food and beverage cans.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Philip Tice

Metal cans are extensively used, in the retail distribution of foods and beverages, where packaging is required to be both robust and able to withstand sterilisation…

Abstract

Metal cans are extensively used, in the retail distribution of foods and beverages, where packaging is required to be both robust and able to withstand sterilisation temperatures. Internal lacquer barrier coatings on the cans play an important role in maintaining the quality of the contents, by preventing any unacceptable metal contamination. It is, however, necessary to ensure that the presence of the lacquer does not itself make the contents unsafe. As yet, the European Commission has produced no directive relating specifically to safety rules for contact between foodstuffs and polymeric or plastic coatings on metal substrates (e.g. lacquer coated cans). It is therefore necessary to turn to individual national laws and regulations, or the Council of Europe Resolution on Coatings, for assurance on the safety of lacquer coated food and beverage cans. Discusses existing EC food contact legislation, and its possible future application to lacquer coated food and beverage cans.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Edel Doherty and Danny Campbell

This paper aims to explore the relationship between consumer demand for enhanced food safety features and regional identification of food amongst consumers across Great…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between consumer demand for enhanced food safety features and regional identification of food amongst consumers across Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the choice experiment method to determine preferences for food testing standards, traceability standards, health and welfare standards, region of origin and price.

Findings

The results show that substantial differences exist in preferences for the features between consumers in both countries. In addition, while stark differences are apparent between the two countries, in their preferences for food originating from their local region, the results suggest that consumers perceive significant substitutability between the enhanced safety features and the local regional label in both countries.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique insight into preferences for a wide range of enhanced food safety features amongst consumers in these two countries. This is the first study to undertake a comparison of these countries using the choice experiment method. In addition, the paper provides a thorough overview of how consumers perceive the relationship between enhanced safety features and region of origin of food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Claire E.A. Seaman, Alan H. Hughes, Charles E. Hinks and Doreen A. Parry

Describes the sensory evaluation techniques which have beendeveloped and their historical perspective. Outlines the uses to whichthe different sensory tests can be put…

Abstract

Describes the sensory evaluation techniques which have been developed and their historical perspective. Outlines the uses to which the different sensory tests can be put together with some of the limitations and practical advantages of each technique.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Alison Chapman

Concept development, evaluation and testing in the new (food) product development situation are reviewed. An analysis is made of why, how and when to concept test, based…

Abstract

Concept development, evaluation and testing in the new (food) product development situation are reviewed. An analysis is made of why, how and when to concept test, based on previous authors' work and various pre‐product launch situations. Emphasis is made of concept testing's validity and its use as an aid in successful product development. The use of concept testing during the reformulation of existing products is considered in depth — an area which has previously lacked adequate appraisal. The flexibility of concept testing is highlighted in particular case study examples, reflecting a feeling that concept testing should not be isolated within the new product development process.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Orla Kennedy, Barbara Stewart‐Knox, Peter Mitchell and David Thurnham

There is an apparent lack of research investigating how different test conditions influence or bias consumer sensory evaluation of food. The aim of the present pilot study…

Abstract

There is an apparent lack of research investigating how different test conditions influence or bias consumer sensory evaluation of food. The aim of the present pilot study was to determine if testing conditions had any effect on responses of an untrained panel to a novel chicken product. Assessments of flavour, texture and overall liking of corn‐fed chicken were made across three different testing conditions (laboratory‐based under normal lighting; laboratory‐based under controlled lighting; and, home testing). Least favourable evaluations occurred under laboratory‐based conditions irrespective of what lighting was used. Consumers perceived the product more favourably in terms of flavour (p < 0.001), texture (p < 0.001) and overall preference (p < 0.001) when evaluated in the familiar setting of the home. Home testing produced more consistent assessments than under either of the two laboratory‐based test conditions. The results imply that home evaluation should be undertaken routinely in new food product development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

P.A. Tice

Takes a look at the new and existing directives concerning theregulations for safety standards with regard particularly for plasticsmonomers. Looks also at the control of…

Abstract

Takes a look at the new and existing directives concerning the regulations for safety standards with regard particularly for plastics monomers. Looks also at the control of these to prevent health hazards for the consumer. The main responsibility for this will lie with the packaging converter.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1970

Talk around Britain's application to enter the European Economic Community goes on; it has never really ceased since the first occasion of the French veto, although in the…

Abstract

Talk around Britain's application to enter the European Economic Community goes on; it has never really ceased since the first occasion of the French veto, although in the last year or so, the airy promise of the first venture has given way to more sober thoughts on the obstacles to joining and the severe burdens to be carried not only by the British people but by many of our kith and kin beyond the seas if the country becomes a full member of the Community.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Sandra Fordyce-Voorham

The purpose of this paper is to design an objective, valid and reliable “Checklist” tool that teachers could use to measure their students’ food skills acquisition.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design an objective, valid and reliable “Checklist” tool that teachers could use to measure their students’ food skills acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the Checklist was based on 18 procedural food skills identified by teachers and verified by analysis of skills in recipes that are typically used in food education programmes in secondary schools. The skills were divided into five skill-sets and a recipe covering the skills was selected to test the Checklist. For the test, three hypothetical situations of a person with low, some and expert skills making the recipe were demonstrated in separate videos. Teachers were invited to test the Checklist by viewing the videos, completing the Checklist for each of the three conditions and completing an evaluation.

Findings

In total, 40 home economics teachers tested the Checklist and reported that they could use the tool to measure the development and progress of their students’ procedural food skills. Analysis of variance analyses of the data and the non-parametric analyses suggest that the Checklist is a reliable and valid evaluation tool.

Originality/value

Teachers report using various tools to measure their students’ food skills acquisition but these have not been well-documented in the literature. These preliminary findings of an original and quantifiable tool showed that home economics teachers used the Checklist to measure their students’ procedural skills however, as the teachers’ comments suggest, further development and validation of the tool are required.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1969

Factors which influence consumer spending, among the most sought after in any field of market research, things people buy and why, is valuable data on which much…

Abstract

Factors which influence consumer spending, among the most sought after in any field of market research, things people buy and why, is valuable data on which much industrial planning, advertising techniques and marketing is based, but in no other field of trade is consumer preference so closely related to pure economics, i.e., value received in money terms, as in food. With most other commodities, from clothes to cars, hair‐do's to houses, factors affecting consumer choice have different results; appearance, aesthetic quality and neighbourly competition, all play a part, though appearance in a few foods is not entirely without significance, e.g., white bread. Present high levels of consumer spending are said by politicians to be a danger to the country's economy; a more prosaic thought would be that Government spending, or squandering, constituted the greater threat. In the main, factors which influence household food expenditure are essentially down to earth—palatability, digestibility, keeping quality and how far a food will go in the preparation of meals, its value in money terms. The king‐pin in all market research on food must be the woman of the house; it is her laying out of the household purse that determines the amount of food expenditure and the varieties purchased week by week. A housewife's choice, however, is a complex of her family's likes and dislikes, rarely her own, and also determined by the amount allocated from her purse for this part of the household budget and the number of mouths she has to feed. Any tendency to experiment, to extend the variety of food, is only possible with a well‐filled purse; with a large family, a common complaint is of monotony in the diet. A factor of immense importance nowadays is whether the housewife is employed or not, and whether whole‐time or part‐time, and which part of the day she can be in her own home. To this may be attributed, as much as anything, the rise in consumption of convenience foods. Fortunately for the purposes of reasonable accuracy in the results of enquiries, housewives form a class, reliable and steady, unlikely to be contaminated by the palsied opinions of the so‐called lunatic fringe in this unquiet age. Any differences in food choice are likely to be regional, and settled dietary habits, passed on from one generation to another. Statistics from the National Food Surveys show the extent of these, and also consumer preferences as far as food commodity groups are concerned. The Surveys have been running long enough to show something of consumer trends but, of course, they do not exhibit reasons—why consumers buy and use certain foods, their attitudes to food marketing practices, and, in particular, to advertising. Advertising claims, misleading undoubtedly but within the law, have long been a source of controversy between those who worship at the shrine of truth and others less particular. Elsewhere, we review a special study of consumer reactions to aspects of the grocery trade in the U.S.A., and note that 32 per cent do not accept advertisements as being true, but 85 per cent find them interesting and informative. Advertising practices are probably subject to less statutory control in the United States than here, and the descriptions and verbiage certainly reach greater heights of absurdity, but the British housewife is likely to be no more discerning, able “to read between the lines”, than her counterpart in that country. A major difference, however, is that in Britain, more houswives prepare and cook meals for their families than in the United States. The greatest importance of advertising is in the introductory phase of a commodity; new and more vigorous advertising is necessary later to delay the onset of the decline phase of the commodity's life cycle; to ensure that sales can be maintained to prevent rises in supply costs. Advertising helps considerably in the acceptance of a branded food, but housewives tend to ignore cut‐throat competition between rival brands, and what weans a consumer from a brand is not competition in advertising, nor even new and more attractive presentation, but reduction in real price. The main pre‐occupation of the woman of the house is food adequacy, and especially that her children will have what she considers conforms to a nutritious diet, without argument or rebellion on the part of her progeny and without distinction. She knows that bulk foods, carbohydrates, are not necessarily nutritious, although her ideas of which foods contain vitamins or minerals or other important nutrient factors tends to be hazy. She does not pretend to enjoy shopping for food and therefore tends to follow a routine; it saves time and worry. Especially is this so with young married women, who may have to take small children along. Each housewife has her own mental standard of assessing “value”, and would have difficulty in defining it. Nutritional value forms part of it, however, in most women, who connote their food provision with health. The greatest concern is not necessarily positive health, but prevention or reduction of obesity, which is seen among adult members of the family, especially growing girls, as an adverse effect on their appearance, and the types of clothes they can wear. A few of the more intelligent families have an indefinable fear of ischaemic heart disease and its relation to food. When they take positive steps to control the diet for these purposes, they are quite frequently in the wrong direction and rather confused even when this is done on medical advice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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