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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Arto Saari, Matti Kruus, Aimo Hämälainen and Juhani Kiiras

Nowadays it is typical that the precise use of a building becomes clear during construction. Current building processes do not support this in Finland. The objective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays it is typical that the precise use of a building becomes clear during construction. Current building processes do not support this in Finland. The objective of this study is to present a novel systematic management of the design process for flexible construction projects, from the project programming stage through to overall design, detailed designs, procurement, and handover, in a situation where the final use of the building becomes clear only during construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The development work included a constructive search for solutions to the problems presented above. The process developed in this study is illustrated with two case projects analysed retrospectively.

Findings

According the open building principle, buildings should be divided into two parts: a permanent base building; and modifiable interior spaces. This division should apply throughout the building's entire life cycle, starting from the beginning of the construction project. The start of the project is the time when goals should be set for the flexibility of the building. The first step in this goal‐setting procedure is to define the flexible modifiable spaces, and the second step is to dimension the permanent base building. A design procedure for this open building procedure has also been developed in the study. The study concludes that traditional boundaries and the content of design packages must be changed. These boundaries should be compatible with the appropriate bid packages and should support implementation of the construction work. The bid packages should follow the division to base building and spaces too.

Originality/value

The procedure proposed forms guidelines for flexible programming, basic principles for design and procurement processes. In addition, it is the starting point to transforming the Finnish standard scope of work for design corresponding to the open building approach.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Mohammad B. Hamida and Mohammad A. Hassanain

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the effective implementation of adaptive reuse projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed approach of qualitative and quantitative techniques was followed in the development of the framework model. A literature review was conducted to comprehend the processes involved in adaptive reuse projects. In total, 90 AEC/FM practitioners were surveyed to identify the current practices in these projects. A generic framework model was then developed to standardize the processes involved, using integration definition for function modeling process modeling methodology. Face-to-face interviews with a targeted group of 30 AEC/FM practitioners were conducted, to validate the developed framework model, by assessing the importance and the frequency of implementing each function in the developed framework model.

Findings

The framework model consisted of four sequential processes, namely, assess the feasibility of the adaptive reuse project, design the adaptive reuse project, construct the adaptive reuse project and operate and maintain the adaptive reuse project. The validation confirmed the importance of all the framework functions and the frequency of their implementation.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature and the AEC/FM professions, through developing a lifecycle and knowledge-oriented framework model for building adaptive reuse. The framework presents clear documentation of adaptive reuse processes. Thus, it holds the potential of endeavoring on adaptive reuse projects to be more efficient.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Elcin Tas and Hakan Yaman

The objectives of this paper are to discuss the constraints stemming from the unstructured nature of the cost estimation practice in Turkey and introduce a generic…

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3706

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to discuss the constraints stemming from the unstructured nature of the cost estimation practice in Turkey and introduce a generic computer aided building cost estimation model based on a cost significant technique for Turkish construction sector public projects in its detailed design phase.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was based on the simplified version of the bill of quantities method and a cost significant estimating model works on a cost database was suggested to overcome the problems. Underlying principles and basic steps of cost estimation based on cost significant work packages was explained by means of manual calculations.

Findings

In order to automate the manual building cost estimation process, the software based on cost significant work packages was developed.

Research limitations/implications

The software is currently in the testing phase and is being used for educational purposes. Making use of both public sector and current market prices in the cost estimation process, increasing number of projects stored in the database for more accurate results, estimating costs of different types of projects and calculating the cost significant value factor more precisely by using statistical techniques, those being employed by global cost models are suggested for future research.

Practical implications

As the number of the similar projects in database is increased, the accuracy of the cost estimation is also increased.

Originality/value

Estimators and graduate students can use the software to estimate building cost of public housing projects in its detailed design phase.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims to investigate and compare how operational knowledge is integrated into the design of buildings and large ships, focussing on the roles affiliation and the competences of the client’s project manager play.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional qualitative methodology with multiple case studies (five cases) was used. In addition, ten expert interviews and two validation focus group interviews were conducted. Case studies included in-depth interviews, document analysis and observations.

Findings

The study showed that organisational affiliation, focus and competences of the client’s project management play an important role in how much effort and resources go into ensuring integration of operational knowledge in the design process. In the ship cases, projects managers’ highest concerns were operations. Yet, the fewest procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were found implemented in these cases. Contrastingly, in the building cases, where operations were not the main matter of concern of project management, a large number of procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were implemented.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this research is the first to compare how integration of operational knowledge is taking place in the design process of buildings and large ships and identifying what these industries can learn from each other. Furthermore, it adds to the limited research on operations in large ship design.

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Mohammad A. Hassanain, Babatunde Adewale, Abdul-Mohsen Al-Hammad and Muizz O. Sanni-Anibire

The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the factors affecting building services’ coordination during the design development and review stages of building projects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the factors affecting building services’ coordination during the design development and review stages of building projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review and interviews were conducted to identify the factors affecting building services’ coordination. In total, 36 factors were identified under six categories: planning phase of the project; design of mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems; construction of MEP systems; operation and maintenance of MEP systems; owner; and design team and tools used. This formed the basis of a questionnaire survey designed utilizing a 5-point Likert scale of importance. The survey was assessed by practitioners in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The top five factors include the scale and complexity of the project, the level of experience of the design team, the quality of the preliminary/conceptual design of the building project, the clarity of the requirements and objectives provided by the owner, the allotted budget for the project and communication skills of the design team members. A high level of agreement between A/E professionals and contractors, and between contractors and facility managers was noted. The research provides the ranking of the identified factors for prioritization.

Practical implications

The paper provides stakeholders in the building services industry with the ranks of the factors that affect building services’ coordination.

Originality/value

The study provided a significant contribution to research and industry, especially in the regional context, where few studies have been conducted. The findings of the study will help in the reduction of construction wastes, delays and cost over-runs.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Xiaozhi Ma, Albert P.C. Chan, Hengqin Wu, Feng Xiong and Na Dong

Although various concepts and techniques are introduced to the built environment to achieve a substantially efficient building production, the effective application of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although various concepts and techniques are introduced to the built environment to achieve a substantially efficient building production, the effective application of these methods in projects is of immense significance to the field of building construction. Among these initiatives, lean construction and building information modelling (BIM) are mainstream endeavours that share many common principles to improve the productivity of the built environment. This study aims to explore and explain how BIM-based integrated data management (IDM) facilitates the achievement of leanness in a built environment project.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is conducted through an ethnographic-action research that relies on the design-science approach and case study through a collaborative research project. As participants of the project, the researchers of this study cooperate with the practitioners to design the project approach and production workflows. Research data and evidence are obtained via participative observation, including direct observation, results of activities, unstructured meetings and self-analysis.

Findings

In this study, the project and production perspectives clarify the building design and production process, as well as analyse how BIM facilitates the achievement of leanness in building design and construction. BIM-based frameworks for IDM have been developed to handle miscellaneous information and data, as well as enhance multidisciplinary collaboration throughout the project life cycle. The role of the integrated BIM model as an information hub between the building design and building construction has been identified.

Research/limitations implications

The project and production views of building and construction are used in this study because the research purpose is to link the BIM-based IDM to lean construction. Although this mixed approach can slightly undermine the theoretical foundation of this study, a substantially comprehensive understanding can be gained as well.

Practical implications

This study provides a new perspective to understand how BIM-based IDM contributes to lean construction.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into IDM in a built environment project with project and production views and presents BIM-based frameworks for IDM to achieve lean construction through the BIM process.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Edmond W.M. Lam, Albert P.C. Chan and Daniel W.M. Chan

This paper aims to develop a project success index (PSI) to benchmark the performance of building maintenance projects from a number of key performance indicators (KPIs).

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4641

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a project success index (PSI) to benchmark the performance of building maintenance projects from a number of key performance indicators (KPIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The research collected 110 responses from project participants with managing building maintenance project experience of the Hong Kong construction industry via ordinary postal mail. In addition, a project success equation was formulated from the principal components analysis to generate a composite score so as to indicate the level of success of building maintenance projects.

Findings

Industry participants believe that time, cost, quality, functionality, safety and environmental friendliness can be considered as KPIs for building maintenance projects. A single index can also be computed from the project success equation to apply different weightings to the respective KPI with different significance such that the performance of building maintenance projects can be compared.

Practical implications

The concept of success remains vague among project participants, which makes it difficult to assess whether the performance of a project is a success or failure. The development of PSI can indicate the overall performance of a building maintenance project and quantify the success concept in a scientific manner.

Originality/value

PSI‐Mains indicates the success level of a building maintenance project for benchmarking purposes. It also enables project stakeholders to measure the success of a building maintenance project and to compare the relative success level among different building maintenance projects in a scientific manner.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Jack C.P. Cheng and Vignesh Venkataraman

Literature on organizational analysis identified that project participants have a certain impact on the project outcome. However, there is no study that identifies the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature on organizational analysis identified that project participants have a certain impact on the project outcome. However, there is no study that identifies the impact of project teams and individual project participants on a green building project. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of green building project teams on green building certification.

Design/methodology/approach

Project information, project team information, and green building certification grade were collected using the Canadian green building database. Project team data were analyzed and organizations were ranked based on their green building project experience and collaborations with experienced green building organizations. The page rank algorithm is used to calculate the rank of organizations in order to identify the impact of organizational rank on the final green building certification grade of a project.

Findings

The results show a positive relationship between the green building certification grade and the number of organizations with more green building experience in a project team. The results also show that not having experienced key organizations such as owners, designers, and contractors will likely lead to a lower green building certification grade.

Originality/value

Impact of project teams on green building projects has not been studied before. This study used an innovative method to analyze green building project teams and to investigate the importance of green building project experience. The findings of this study provided evidence to support the influence of project team compositions in green building projects. The results presented in this paper can help project owners and managers during project team formation for successful execution of green building projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Torbjørn Korsvold and Lone Sletbakk Ramstad

Building on the empirical work of a doctoral dissertation on change management in the Norwegian building industry, this paper provides the outline of a generic innovation…

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2506

Abstract

Building on the empirical work of a doctoral dissertation on change management in the Norwegian building industry, this paper provides the outline of a generic innovation model for creating innovation and increased productivity in building projects. Central to this innovation model is the necessity for participative visualization of a common frame of reference. This is a shared understanding visualized as a joint enterprise image of the whole of the parts and the relationships of actual collective work practice integrating the planning and construction part of the building process as a whole. The model consists of three necessary arenas for knowledge development, being identified as “collective knowing”: “relational knowledge”, and “knowing how”. The paper concludes that the knowledge content of each arena continuously relates to one another in a dynamic and interdependent way constituting an actionable and generic model for innovation and productivity in the building process.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Florence Yean Yng Ling

The objectives of this paper are to: find out whether design‐bid‐build (DBB) or design‐build (DB) procurement method gives better quality building; identify variables that…

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1965

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to: find out whether design‐bid‐build (DBB) or design‐build (DB) procurement method gives better quality building; identify variables that significantly affect quality scores of DBB and DB projects; and construct models to predict quality scores of DB and DBB projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was based on a structured questionnaire and data on quality performance and factors that may affect quality of a building project were collected by postal survey and face‐to‐face interviews.

Findings

There was no significant difference between the quality scores of DB and DBB projects. To ensure that buildings procured through DBB have high quality, owners should adopt the following practices: engage experienced consultants; short‐list bidders and select contractors based on a combination of price and ability. To obtain high quality DB buildings, owners should engage architects to prepare the scheme design and not to set the budget too early. For both types of projects, owners should allow contractors to propose changes to the contract with a view to improving its quality.

Research limitations/implications

As there is no significant difference in quality of DBB and DB projects, the argument that DB projects produce lower quality buildings is demolished.

Practical implications

The practical implication is that owners play an important part in ensuring that they obtain buildings of high quality.

Originality/value

Building owners and consultants can use the two models to predict quality scores of DBB and DB projects and take specific actions to improve the quality of their projects if necessary.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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