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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Arto Saari, Matti Kruus, Aimo Hämälainen and Juhani Kiiras

Nowadays it is typical that the precise use of a building becomes clear during construction. Current building processes do not support this in Finland. The objective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays it is typical that the precise use of a building becomes clear during construction. Current building processes do not support this in Finland. The objective of this study is to present a novel systematic management of the design process for flexible construction projects, from the project programming stage through to overall design, detailed designs, procurement, and handover, in a situation where the final use of the building becomes clear only during construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The development work included a constructive search for solutions to the problems presented above. The process developed in this study is illustrated with two case projects analysed retrospectively.

Findings

According the open building principle, buildings should be divided into two parts: a permanent base building; and modifiable interior spaces. This division should apply throughout the building's entire life cycle, starting from the beginning of the construction project. The start of the project is the time when goals should be set for the flexibility of the building. The first step in this goal‐setting procedure is to define the flexible modifiable spaces, and the second step is to dimension the permanent base building. A design procedure for this open building procedure has also been developed in the study. The study concludes that traditional boundaries and the content of design packages must be changed. These boundaries should be compatible with the appropriate bid packages and should support implementation of the construction work. The bid packages should follow the division to base building and spaces too.

Originality/value

The procedure proposed forms guidelines for flexible programming, basic principles for design and procurement processes. In addition, it is the starting point to transforming the Finnish standard scope of work for design corresponding to the open building approach.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

R. Brahme and A. Mahdavi

It is important to provide building performance feedback to the designer as early as possible in the design process. However, many aspects of building performance are…

Abstract

It is important to provide building performance feedback to the designer as early as possible in the design process. However, many aspects of building performance are significantly affected by the design of the building’s technical systems (e.g., heating, airconditioning), which are typically configured in detail only in the later stages of design. The challenge is thus to find a method to use detailed simulation tools even during the early stages of design when values for many of the variables for the building’s technical systems are not yet available. In this paper, we demonstrate how this problem can be partially solved by use of differential representation for building and technical system, homology‐based automatic mapping of relevant information from the building to the technical system representation, and generative design agents which, with a minimal user‐input, can design and model the technical system. We conclude the paper with illustrative examples of detailed performance analysis of complex buildings and their heating, ventilation, and air‐conditioning systems, performed in early stages of design.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jacques Vink

Flex−buildings are buildings which are literally designed to change. A flex−building must be able to accept different infills and its users must be able to easily adapt…

Abstract

Flex−buildings are buildings which are literally designed to change. A flex−building must be able to accept different infills and its users must be able to easily adapt their surroundings.

Flexibility is defined as the capacity of a building to undergo modifications and accept changes of function with limited structural interventions. More than 40% of the activities housed in a flex building can continue to function during modification.

Studies into flex−buildings (commissioned by the Dutch Government) have elicited a number of insights. These are not hard−and−fast conclusions but more in the region of statements and reminders for those involved with flex−buildings.

These studies show that it takes more than civil engineering to successfully realise such buildings. Aspects of use and management are at least as important. Besides, it requires designers who are willing to let go of their design after it is finished. For the result is not a completed ‘architectural’ product but a continually changing object.

Following insights (among others) will be illustrated with built and unbuilt projects in the Netherlands.

• The façade design, for example, figures prominently in designing flexible buildings. It makes special demands on the design’s presentation during the design process, as the building can assume different appearances over time. The double facade is a promising concept that allows for expressive and/or open facades in flexible buildings. It can also help to reduce a building’s energy consumption.

• Also by deliberately incorporating excessive space and construction a building has the necessary leeway to accommodate future developments. A building’s flexibility is enhanced by oversize in structure as well as space.

• A big multi−use building in Rotterdam (H. A. Maaskant / W. van Tijen (1951)) and recent projects of RUIMTELAB are presented as case−studies. These are an inspiration for architects and planners looking for design tools to help achieve an open architecture.

Details

Open House International, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Jochem C. Nijs, Elma Durmisevic and Johannes I.M. Halman

Open Building and IFD (Industrial Flexible Demountable) building are philosophies that aim to create high quality buildings with increased flexibility and better…

Abstract

Open Building and IFD (Industrial Flexible Demountable) building are philosophies that aim to create high quality buildings with increased flexibility and better environmental characteristics. However, a successful adoption of IFD principles has not yet occurred because of concerns for the types of connections that are needed between building components. Therefore, this paper describes PhD research at the University of Twente that has the objective of designing a typology of flexible interfaces for IFD building that can be widely applied in the construction industry and aims to standardize connections, at the various levels of technical composition of a building, to create compatibility between building products from different suppliers. Such a typology of interfaces will increase the re-use and recycling of building parts, resulting in the increased sustainability of the building process. Furthermore, it will help accelerate the industrialization of the housing industry and mass customization of housing. A preliminary case study, in which a sustainable, flexible bathroom is designed, illustrates the various types of interfaces that can be applied, based on existing research. The paper illustrates the importance of interfaces, and aims to increase environmental benefits of buildings (less construction waste), improve the social aspects (higher user satisfaction in buildings) and achieve economical advantages (lower overall costs) by designing new interfaces.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

S.M. Lo, C.M. Zhao and K.K. Yuen

Traditionally, buildings are designed in accordance with prescriptive building and fire codes. Rapid urbanization causes an increase in urban population and commercial…

1170

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, buildings are designed in accordance with prescriptive building and fire codes. Rapid urbanization causes an increase in urban population and commercial activities, and an increase in demand for large and complex buildings. Buildings that have been constructed in accordance with the old prescriptive requirements may not have the same fire safety level as the standard enforced today, even if all fire safety items are maintained at the original design standard. It is the usual practice that any upgrading or alteration works to be carried out in an existing building are required to comply with the requirements currently enforced. The demand for using a performance‐based approach for designing large complex buildings as well as alteration works in existing or historical buildings is increasing. The paper aims to discuss the issues involved

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a brief comparison of the use of performance‐based fire safety design in three locations and presents the use of a system dynamics model to examine how the technological investment will affect the use of performance‐based fire safety design.

Findings

The model predicts that increased investment by the Hong Kong authorities would see a rise in the number of building projects using a performance‐based approach within a few years.

Originality/value

The research in this paper provides guidance to the building control regime in Hong Kong on how to achieve an increase in the use of a fire‐engineered approach to enhance fire safety design in buildings.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

Ephraim Zulu, Sambo Lyson Zulu, Mwansa Chabala, Neema Kavishe, Charles Chifunda and Innocent Musonda

While previous studies have highlighted the importance of incorporating environmental sustainability in building designs, there is a paucity of studies that assess the…

Abstract

Purpose

While previous studies have highlighted the importance of incorporating environmental sustainability in building designs, there is a paucity of studies that assess the extent to which design teams in developing countries consider environmental sustainability at the building design stage. Therefore, using Zambia as a case study, this study examined the extent to which infrastructure design teams in a developing country consider environmental sustainability at the design stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative research approach using structured interviews because there are hardly any studies which have explored the extent to which designers incorporate environmental sustainability in infrastructure designs in developing countries. The data is analysed thematically using the ATLAS.ti software.

Findings

The results show that environmental sustainability is not an important design consideration because it is secondary to functional, technical and aesthetic considerations. Environmental considerations are also made in an ad hoc manner and when it is cost-effective for the project. Regulatory requirements pertaining to environmental protection are adhered to without any cost considerations. It was, therefore, theorised that building design teams in developing countries make technical, functional and aesthetic consideration during the infrastructure design stage ahead of environmental considerations.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of studies that have investigated whether building infrastructure designers consider issues of environmental sustainability at the design stage in developing countries. The findings have practical implications on how developing countries can foster environmental sustainability at the design stage and avoid generating a building infrastructure stock that will require environmental resilience adaptation in the future.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Siti Zati Hanani Mahamood and Mohamad Syazli Fathi

This paper aims to improve the seismic building design (SBD) work process for Malaysian Government projects.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve the seismic building design (SBD) work process for Malaysian Government projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were virtually conducted to a small sample size of internal and external stakeholders from the Malaysian Government technical agency. There were seven of them, comprising Structural Engineers, an Architect, a Quantity Surveyor and consultants-linked government projects. The respondents have at least five years of experience in building design and construction.

Findings

The paper evaluates the current SBD work process in the government technical agency. There were four main elements that appear to need to be improved, specifically in the design stage: limitations in visualization, variation of works, data management and coordination.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to Malaysian Government building projects and covered a small sample size. Therefore, further research is recommended to extend to other government agencies or ministries to obtain better results. Furthermore, the findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects.

Practical implications

The findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects.

Social implications

This study was limited to government building projects and covered a small sample size. Therefore, further research is recommended to extend to other government agencies or ministries to obtain better results. Furthermore, the findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects.

Originality/value

This study provides an initial step to introduce the potential of building information modeling for SBD in implementing Malaysian Government projects. It will be beneficial both pre-and post-disaster and is a significant step toward a resilient infrastructure and community.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2014

Matthew R. Griffis

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library…

Abstract

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library users and staff in public libraries and how building design regulates spatial behavior according to organizational objectives. It considers three public library buildings as organization spaces (Dale & Burrell, 2008) and determines the extent to which their spatial organizations reproduce the relations of power between the library and its public that originated with the modern public library building type ca. 1900. Adopting a multicase study design, I conducted site visits to three, purposefully selected public library buildings of similar size but various ages. Site visits included: blueprint analysis; organizational document analysis; in-depth, semi-structured interviews with library users and library staff; cognitive mapping exercises; observations; and photography.

Despite newer approaches to designing public library buildings, the use of newer information technologies, and the emergence of newer paradigms of library service delivery (e.g., the user-centered model), findings strongly suggest that the library as an organization still relies on many of the same socio-spatial models of control as it did one century ago when public library design first became standardized. The three public libraries examined show spatial organizations that were designed primarily with the librarian, library materials, and library operations in mind far more than the library user or the user’s many needs. This not only calls into question the public library’s progressiveness over the last century but also hints at its ability to survive in the new century.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-744-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2022

Aliakbar Kamari, Bartlomiej Marek Kotula and Carl Peter Leslie Schultz

A robust method in environmental load assessment of buildings is urgently required to reduce the environmental burden of the construction industry. While the industry…

230

Abstract

Purpose

A robust method in environmental load assessment of buildings is urgently required to reduce the environmental burden of the construction industry. While the industry utilizes the life cycle assessment (LCA) method to assess environmental impacts of detailed designs, the implementation of changes at that late stage of development is often expensive and undesirable. On the other hand, during the early design stages, the LCA method is severely limited by the lack of information available, e.g., uncertainty about final materials to be used. This research study investigates how building information modeling (BIM) can facilitate LCA analysis at an early design stage.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted to establish a framework for BIM and LCA integration, which creates the foundation for the development of a new BIM-based LCA tool. The tool is empirically evaluated on a large case study of a residential building in Denmark.

Findings

Case study results show that the new tool facilitates decision-making in an integrated design process, providing reliable LCA results on an early stage model, while avoiding intermediate manual input by the end user in contrast to other commercial LCA tools.

Originality/value

A first prototype of a BIM-based tool is demonstrated, which allows professionals, small architectural companies, students and researchers to calculate the environmental loads of the building in the early design stage in an automated, transparent and time-saving manner.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Abdulrahman M. Almufarrej and Tohid Erfani

The two main contributing factors that control the overall buildings’ energy performance are the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system and the envelope…

Abstract

Purpose

The two main contributing factors that control the overall buildings’ energy performance are the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system and the envelope design. Environmental design guidelines that consider these two factors aim to lower energy consumption. However, they are regional and climate-sensitive. This study aims to investigate how three main buildings’ envelope design variables (orientation, compactness and window to wall ratio) impact the overall building’s energy consumption within Kuwait’s regional and climate conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study simulate the energy consumption of typically shaped buildings by varying their geometry between a square to a rectangular floor plan. This study analyse the associated energy usage and provide early-stage envelope design guidance specific to the country’s conditions, to make informed decisions towards environmentally conscious buildings.

Findings

The analysed envelope variables have the potential to reduce energy consumption by 40%, and the possibility to reduce HVAC system capacity by 30%. In contrast to the general guidance in literature and standards, the simulation results demonstrate that less compact building forms perform on occasions better than the most compact ones.

Originality/value

The objective of this paper is to quantify the energy consumption rates for buildings located within the Arabian Peninsula, an under-studied region with potentially high interest considering three main envelope design variables. The buildings’ yearly energy consumption patterns are unique and suggest different envelope design considerations, compared to other regions with different climate conditions. This emphasises the importance of regional guidelines for the different factors associated with energy and buildings’ environmental performance.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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