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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Aristofanis Soulikias, Carmela Cucuzzella, Firdous Nizar, Morteza Hazbei and Sherif Goubran

Highly sophisticated digital technologies have distanced architects and designers from intimate and immediate hand-drawing practices. Meanwhile the changes they rapidly…

Abstract

Purpose

Highly sophisticated digital technologies have distanced architects and designers from intimate and immediate hand-drawing practices. Meanwhile the changes they rapidly bring come with undetected changes in cultural and social norms regarding the built environment. The growing dependence on computers calls for a more holistic, socially inclusive and place-responsive design practice. This paper aims to shed light on what we are losing in the design process as we rapidly transition to communicate architecture using digital media. The authors contemplate the paradigms in which the human body and physical objects still play an important role in today's design environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at current trends in developing and establishing “computer imaging” within architectural education, and the architectural profession through parametric design and the area of sustainability. In order to reveal novel and hybrid ways of architectural image-making, it also looks into art forms that already experiment with bodily practices in design by taking an artisanal animation project as a case study.

Findings

The renewed longing for craft, haptic environments, tactile experiences and hand-crafted artifacts and artworks that engage the senses can be exemplified with the success of the documentary Last Dance on the Main, an animated film on the endangered layers of human presence in one of Montreal's downtown neighborhoods. The open possibilities for creative hybridizations between the handmade and the digital in architecture practice and education are exposed.

Originality/value

The influence of film on the perception and consequent design of cities is well documented. There is little literature, however, on how the materiality and process of artisanal film animation can provide alternative, if not additional, insights on how to communicate various aspects of the built environment, particularly those rooted in the human body. Furthermore, handmade film explores a broader understanding of sustainability, which includes considerations for social and cultural contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Beata Kupiec and Brian Revell

This paper aims to identify and describe the determinants of consumer attitudes towards artisanal cheeses within the speciality cheese market and the reasons behind the…

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1941

Abstract

This paper aims to identify and describe the determinants of consumer attitudes towards artisanal cheeses within the speciality cheese market and the reasons behind the growing interest in this premium value sector as evinced by two surveys of specialist food retailers and artisanal cheese consumers. The survey results obtained are presented in the context of a changing consumption culture and the concept of an emerging “postmodern” consumerism. Artisanal cheese consumers focus on the unique characteristics of the products and their distinctive character in relation to mass produced industrial cheeses. Price and functional properties of artisanal cheeses are less important in the consumer purchase decision. Artisanal cheese consumers are characterised by “variety seeking” behaviour. This is stimulated by the broad range of available flavours, tastes and cheese types and suggests a low degree of brand or even cheese‐type loyalty among such consumers. The “plural” nature of the “speciality” cheese market accommodates well the highly individual and fragmented requirements of consumers of artisanal cheeses.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Rossella Di Monaco, Sabrina Di Marzo, Silvana Cavella and Paolo Masi

This study aimed to assess if an Italian artisanal pasta filata cheese, named Provolone del Monaco, is perceived by consumers as typical or not and if any variability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to assess if an Italian artisanal pasta filata cheese, named Provolone del Monaco, is perceived by consumers as typical or not and if any variability exists among cheeses made by different dairies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were performed. In the first experiment, two artisanal Provolone del Monaco having different ripening times and two industrial Provolone cheeses were evaluated. A total of 95 subjects, divided into three homogeneous groups, first rated the samples in blind condition, then, after having received information about typicality; price, and both sets of information. In the second experiment, the quantitative descriptive profiles of eight Provolone del Monaco samples aged six months and made by different dairies were compared with the quantitative descriptive profiles of the same cheese aged ten months and provolone cheeses made by industrial dairies.

Findings

Consumer results revealed that consumers knowing typicality information gave a better score to cheeses markedly different. The price together with typicality information, represented a quality indicator. Cluster analysis of descriptive scores revealed homogeneity between the equally aged Provolone del Monaco samples. Moreover descriptive data showed that cheese was characterized by several specific attributes, that the consumer, probably, recognized as typical.

Research limitations

It must be noticed that once it was performed in Campania, the results extrapolation to other regions or countries should not be made unless similar results are found.

Originality/value

This study will contribute to better addressing consumer needs and enhancing the competitiveness of traditional foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Ajay Kumar Koli

The purpose of this study is to identify the key criteria from the perspective of handmade, authenticity and sustainability for purchasing craft items by Indian consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the key criteria from the perspective of handmade, authenticity and sustainability for purchasing craft items by Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research was conducted on the buying behaviour of Assamese muga mekhela chador (MMC). Data were collected using purposive sampling and video-recorded focus group discussions (FGDs). Output transcripts were content-analysed using the R package RQDI.

Findings

Indian consumers largely define crafts as handmade. Results indicate the crucial role of craft design and price. Craft authenticity, craft knowledge and social identity evolved as the key criteria for buying crafts. State intervention in craft certification is demanded. Indian craft consumers lack awareness about sustainable consumption.

Originality/value

India is home to millions of craftspeople and craft buyers. Most of the earlier craft studies focused on the problems of craft production in India. This study contributes to the consumption literature, from the standpoints of authenticity and sustainability, which are often limited to Western consumers. Understanding its own domestic craft market will help Indian policymakers and organisations to reduce export dependency and to tap potential local craft demand.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Gökhan Yılmaz, Doğuş Kılıçarslan and Meltem Caber

As one of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization initiatives, the creative cities network (CCN) declares the cities that are creative in the…

Abstract

Purpose

As one of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization initiatives, the creative cities network (CCN) declares the cities that are creative in the contexts of music, gastronomy, design, etc., with the aim of promoting cooperation amongst the member cities and maintaining sustainable urban development. This study aims to identify the destination food image of Gaziantep in Turkey, which is a member gastronomy city of the CCN since 2015. Identified destination food image elements were connected to the common targets of the CCN to show how the city may contribute to the network objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage research process was used in the study. First, qualitative approach was adopted for the clarification of projected and perceived destination food image elements. Projected image elements were derived from a content analysis performed on a totally 113 official, semi-official and unofficial online documents in Turkish and English. Perceived destination food image elements were identified by face-to-face interviews, conducted on 10 participants. As a result, 18 projected and 20 perceived destination food image elements were obtained. These were then grouped under 4 main and 22 sub-categories. At the second stage, destination food image elements were matched with common targets of the CCN.

Findings

Destination food image elements, obtained by two qualitative studies, are grouped under 4 main and 22 sub-categories as follows: gastronomic identity (with sub-categories of destination’s identity and local culinary culture); diversity of the destination (with sub-categories of attractiveness of the local food, ease of promotion and high brand value); gastronomic attractions (with sub-categories of restaurants and cafes, culinary museums, farmer markets, orchards, gastronomy tours, gastronomy events (e.g. festivals, competitions), culinary education, books on gastronomy, certification systems, organizations, street foods and vendors and handmade or homemade foods); and qualified workforce and stakeholders (with sub-categories of expert chefs and cooks, specialist suppliers, service personnel, locals and local authorities). These are then connected to the common CCN targets (e.g. cuisine, tourism and festivals; extension of the creative value chain; fostering cultural creativity; and sustainability).

Originality/value

This is one of the early research attempts in examining a member gastronomy city’s food image elements and the role that they played in the success of the CCN’s common targets. Moreover, the study contributes to the literature on the identification of (projected and perceived) destination food image by using content analysis.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Joshua Shuart

The handmade bicycle industry has grown exponentially over the past decade. Although existing for decades in much smaller numbers, the popularity and credibility of…

Abstract

The handmade bicycle industry has grown exponentially over the past decade. Although existing for decades in much smaller numbers, the popularity and credibility of framebuilder entrepreneurship–custom, handmade bike frames–has increased significantly in the past 10 years. The companies that specialize in custom-producing bicycle frames vary in size, scope, reputation, profitability, and even building materials.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Ye Wang and Fei Qiao

The purpose of this study is uncovering the connotative and symbolic meaning of “luxury-lite brands” [轻奢].

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is uncovering the connotative and symbolic meaning of “luxury-lite brands” [轻奢].

Design/methodology/approach

Applying mixed methods, this study conducted two studies: (1) a semiotic analysis of a focus group discussion and 10 interviews on luxury-lite brands and (2) a content analysis of 248 Weiblog posts from 10 luxury-lite brands in a two-month period.

Findings

Study 1 showed that luxury-lite brands are interpreted as foreign brands that serve people's needs for social presence, and symbolize youthfulness, tastefulness, and aspirations. Other descriptors of luxury-lite brands included unique design, and less than the best quality offered by luxury brand. Study 2 suggested brands are missing out on a wide range of stories that resonate with their core segments in their social media advertising.

Practical implications

Based on the definition of luxury-lite brands in the context of China proposed by the researchers, we recommend that managers broaden topics of stories, make more effort to create desirable symbolic brand meaning, and use social media to excite these young crowds.

Originality/value

Luxury-lite brands have been a cultural sign in the Chinese market projected to grow into an over 90 billion USD business by 2025. Therefore, an insightful understanding of the masstige market of China is a must for any Western masstige brand to be successful and competitive.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Jéssica Ferreira, Bruno Miguel Sousa and Francisco Gonçalves

This study aims to establish a relationship between creative tourism and experiences in the traditional handicrafts of Barcelos (Portugal). Based on a qualitative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish a relationship between creative tourism and experiences in the traditional handicrafts of Barcelos (Portugal). Based on a qualitative approach, it also aims at analyzing the failures and absences from the tourist market by creating new proposals and responses to the demand. The conceptual framework of this study develops three proposals: first, to present new concepts and opportunities for the tourism market; second, to establish a direct relationship between the local traditional handicrafts, creative tourism and experiences; and finally, to promote traditions that add value to the local development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an ethnographic case analysis research design to investigate the propositions (ten in-depth interviews with technicians and artisans in Barcelos, Portugal). The key constructs are drawn from empirical research among handicraftsmen in which data analysis was carried out based on a qualitative analysis.

Findings

The results suggest the experience, knowledge and importance of learning this dynamic in an entrepreneurship tourism perspective. Creative tourism and experiences are growing and strengthening the territories and consumer satisfaction in specific artisan, cultural and tourism entrepreneurship contexts.

Research limitations/implications

This study fills a large gap in the territorial market, associating the knowledge of new concepts with the success of the tourism entrepreneurship. The findings provide solutions for helping handicraftsmen to improve their decision-making logic and increase the speed of market growth. There has been an increased emphasis on local and handmade goods that are linked to the culture and tourism of specific destinations.

Originality/value

Tourism managers and artisan entrepreneurs can use the outcome of this study to gain in-depth understanding of customer experiences (i.e. consumers of local handicrafts) and develop effective marketing strategies and further stage the operational environment that can maximize customers’ perceived experiential value.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Mohsin Shafi, Lixi Yin, Yue Yuan and Zoya

This study aims to examine issues affecting the growth and survival of traditional handicraft enterprising community in Pakistan, and analyzes their strengths, weaknesses…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine issues affecting the growth and survival of traditional handicraft enterprising community in Pakistan, and analyzes their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, as well as develops strategic solutions to overcome the problems identified for their revival.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study is based on a descriptive approach because it attempts to investigate the critical issues faced by traditional handicraft enterprising community. To operationalize the theoretical approach, this paper used a SWOT analysis of craft enterprising community. After thoroughly reviewing relevant literature, this study put forward strategic solutions for the revival of the traditional enterprising community. Moreover, secondary data on employment and gender wage gap were used to provide empirical evidence of the issues identified and emphasize the importance of strategic solutions.

Findings

This study found that traditional handicraft producers are facing many problems that hinder their survival and growth. This paper, therefore, makes some essential strategic recommendations on how to overcome these issues. The current research argues that Pakistan’s handicraft industry must be revived; else, centuries-old traditional culture and patrimonial knowledge will vanish. Moreover, there is a need to attract foreign investment to overcome resource limitations and improve the competitive capability of the enterprising community. Notably, government intervention is necessary for the revival of the traditional handicraft industry.

Originality/value

This study provides in-depth knowledge of issues faced by the Pakistani traditional handicraft enterprising community and suggests possible strategic solutions for the problems identified. Unlike previous studies, this research also discusses the essential characteristics of traditional handicrafts that differentiate them from identical mechanized products.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Nor Amirah binti Mohd Amran, Mohd Sayuti bin Ab Karim, Rusdi bin Abd Rashid, Waleed Alghani and Nur Aqilah binti Derahman

This study aims to present a direct repurposing activity of consumed high-speed steel (HSS) hacksaw blade into fine-looking handmade knives to increase the awareness about…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a direct repurposing activity of consumed high-speed steel (HSS) hacksaw blade into fine-looking handmade knives to increase the awareness about sustainability by evaluating the relationship between the quality of material alloys and heat treatment as well as cultural aspects such as the treatment on the HSS hacksaw blade that will affect the material hardness.

Design/methodology/approach

The quality of HSS hacksaw blade samples was analyzed by using scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) through the identification of material element’s properties. Besides, finite element structural analysis was performed by using SolidWorks Simulation to evaluate the material performance by determining the Von Mises stress to find the factor of safety of the knife designs. Then, the effect of tribology implementation toward mechanical properties of the handmade knives was determined by using a Rockwell C hardness test.

Findings

It is found that the material composition of carbon plays a vital role in increasing and improving the hardness and wear resistance of the HSS hacksaw blade. The Von Mises stress obtained is lower than the yield strength of 3,250 MPa by 71.44 per cent with the safety factor of 3.58,which means the design will not be subjected to failure. The mechanical properties of the HSS hacksaw blade such as hardness were determined averagely by 5 per cent of hardness increase.

Originality/value

It has been validated that the tribological effect toward the material characteristic leads to hardness changes which contributed to the enhancement of tool life of the HSS hacksaw blade, thus producing better quality knives.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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