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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Erika C. Piazzoli

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on reflective practice as a qualitative methodology, and reflection-in-action as a modus operandi to engage with the artistry of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on reflective practice as a qualitative methodology, and reflection-in-action as a modus operandi to engage with the artistry of cross-language qualitative research.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on the doctoral research, a cross-language multiple case study aimed at investigating the author’s evolving understanding, as a reflective practitioner, of drama-based pedagogy for teaching Italian as a second language.

Findings

A reflective analysis of the author’s tacit decision making during drama improvisation unveiled a clash between covert beliefs and overt attitudes in the author’s practice. In this paper, the author examine this process and highlight the value of translingual writing (writing in two languages) as a method of enquiry that allowed me to become aware of this clash.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this research is that the nature of this clash of beliefs is confined to the idiosyncrasy of one practitioner. However, the methodological implications are relevant to cross-language qualitative researchers fluent in two (or more) languages. Frequently, translingual researchers focus all writing efforts in one language only, because of the absence of methodological guidelines bridging cross-language research, reflective practice and translingual studies.

Practical implications

Strategies to investigate awareness of tacit beliefs in educational practice may help other second language/drama reflective practitioners to better understand their knowing in-action.

Originality/value

This paper represents a first step in disseminating knowledge about translingual writing as method, and is of value to all those translingual researchers who are interested in reflective methodologies.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Pak Yoong

Reports part of a grounded theory study in which 15 facilitators, already experienced in conventional meetings, were trained to become facilitators of face‐to‐face…

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1511

Abstract

Reports part of a grounded theory study in which 15 facilitators, already experienced in conventional meetings, were trained to become facilitators of face‐to‐face electronic meetings. Presents a model ‐ “Active reflection” ‐ of the reflective practice processes used by the trainee facilitators. Active reflection is a term which describes the trainees’ accounts of the two complementary action reflection processes: reflection on action (thinking back on what was done) and reflection in action (thinking about the action while one is doing it). Identifies a number of implications for group support systems facilitation training and practice.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Marianne Tracy

The purpose for this study is to publish the author’s dissertation research.

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704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose for this study is to publish the author’s dissertation research.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study used stimulated recall (Gass and Mackey, 2000) of critical incidents (Flanagan, 1954) in a structured reflection interview (Johns, 1994) to study executives’ “reflection-in-action and on action” business practices. All of the participants (60 people from 10 organizations, aged from 38 to 68) were experienced executives. Each brought an average of over 15 years of leadership and industry experience to their understanding of and experience with these phenomena. The results were analyzed using Miles and Huberman (1994) qualitative data analysis methods.

Findings

Three research questions guided this study: How do executives describe, understand and utilize reflection-in-action in their work practices? The study participants were interviewed soon after an experience, meeting with subordinates and a discussion of two critical incidents representing their reflection-in-action to isolate and illuminate the instant and better understand this often subconscious process of reflection-in-action; How do executives describe, understand and use reflection-on-action in their working life? Here the study participants were asked to describe a recent change initiated by reflection-on-action to better understand that process and how it moves from reflection-on-action to action-on-reflection: the initiation of the new action or change; How do executives learn and develop their reflective practices? The participants were asked to describe how they learned, developed and sustained their reflective practices to better understand the nature and development of reflective practice on all levels: in-action, on-action and cyclically. The results of my research included four areas of analysis: reflection as emotional interaction, reflection as development, reflection as a system and reflection as a frame of knowing.

Originality/value

In this doctoral work, the author attempted to show that reflection contributes to improved performance. What the author also learned was that there is a positive relationship between reflection and building supervisor/employee relations, especially within teams. The author also learned that as you reflect, there are a lot of emotions involved. This is largely, in the author’s opinion, where there is a results focus and during performance conversations. The importance of this is that people grow and change when this happens. There is a definitive link. This was the author’s hypothesis and was proved.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Carolina Walger, Karina De Dea Roglio and Gustavo Abib

Human resources (HR) department managers play an important role in the processes of defining and implementing organizational strategies. From this perspective, decisions…

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3036

Abstract

Purpose

Human resources (HR) department managers play an important role in the processes of defining and implementing organizational strategies. From this perspective, decisions made by HR managers directly influence organizations’ competitiveness. There is a gap in the literature related to decision-making processes by these managers, particularly with respect to the subjective elements involved in them. This paper’s aim is to analyze HR managers’ strategic decision-making processes from the perspective of reflective practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted based on an analysis of five HR department managers’ strategic decision-making processes.

Findings

The results indicate that reflection-in-action is one possibility for narrowing the gap between action and reflection in management practice, as this could contribute to improving strategic decisions; HR managers’ decisions are delimited by internal and external organizational issues; and these decisions involve intensive information sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research contribute to extend the existing knowledge on reflection, one of the subjective elements that influences decision-making processes, and which has been identified as a subject in need of research by several authors (Eisenhardt and Zbaracki, 1992; Hambrick, 2007; Langley et al., 1995; Nutt, 2010).

Practical implications

A better understanding of HR managers’ decision-making processes, particularly in the Brazilian context, which other organizations can use as examples of alternative choices for HR departments strategic management. For managers, reflection-in-action facilitates an effective decision-making process, increases self-knowledge, contributes to the processes of individual and organizational learning and improves managers’ global overview of their organizations.

Originality/value

These results represent a development in understanding one of the subjective elements of HR department managers’ decision-making processes – reflection – and should help to improve the results of strategic decisions by these managers and by managers of other organizational departments.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Ari Heiskanen

Explores the possibilities of basing scientific investigation onthe practical experiences gained by the author when he participated inthe development of the Student…

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587

Abstract

Explores the possibilities of basing scientific investigation on the practical experiences gained by the author when he participated in the development of the Student Information System of a Finnish university. The practical process which lasted over a decade contained several theoretically interesting issues which could be formulated as meaningful research problems. They concerned the design of acts, the evaluation of the outcomes of the various phases of the process, and the formulation of the experience to models which could be transferred to other contexts. The overall analysis method is reflection‐in‐action in the form suggested by Donald Schön. Each practical problem is paraphrased through reflection‐in‐action which yields a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon at hand. This frames the situation; the framing is necessary for the solution that is to be designed. Indicates that reflection‐in‐action can yield research results just as valid as other types of organizational studies. It is not superior to other possible approaches such as action research or organizational ethnography, but the threats to its quality, like the danger of partiality and revisionism of the investigator involved, are compensated for because the researcher has excellent access to the target organization and even confidential data.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Ghassoub Mustafa

The first part presents a review of concepts relating to reflection, drawing on the literature in this area. This literature review relates to the following aspects of…

Abstract

The first part presents a review of concepts relating to reflection, drawing on the literature in this area. This literature review relates to the following aspects of reflection: the definition of reflection, the process of reflection, strategies in reflection, content of reflection, barriers to reflection, and advantages of reflection.

The second part of this paper presents an investigation into the perceptions of a small sample of English language educators and supervisors, through personal interviews with 9 teachers and 3 supervisors from one higher education institution and other educational institutions in the United Arab Emirates. The findings of the investigation are analyzed with respect to the dimensions that appear in the literature review. These findings show that the teachers do have some knowledge of reflection. They reveal that the teachers: attitudes towards reflection and its applicability in the teaching and learning process is largely positive, mixed with some degree of skepticism. Teachers agree that reflection is useful, but many seem uncertain about how it can be applied in their situation. In some cases the interviewees seemed to be more concerned about the technicalities of their job, making collaborative reflection appear less of a priority.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Theodora Issa, Tomayess Issa, Rohini Balapumi, Lydia Maketo and Umera Imtinan

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question ‘Why reflection is important to introduce in the teaching and learning’. This paper commences with a brief literature

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question ‘Why reflection is important to introduce in the teaching and learning’. This paper commences with a brief literature review on reflection, followed by the provision of tentative results of a study on the role of reflection in learning. Data collected from a sample population of 257 undergraduate students at business ethics undergraduate class in Australia were analysed. The data were collected from students’ own reflections that formed part of two of their assessments in the unit. In the first assessment, students were asked to reflect on their own moral development, using Schon’s reflection in and on action, to allow the markers understand the students’ own moral development as highlighted by Kohlberg levels and stages of Moral Development. In the second assessment, the students were asked to reflect on their personal learning as a global citizen and how this assessment has informed their views and perspective on ethical decision-making process and global citizenship using one of the frameworks introduced during the semester (e.g. situation, task, action, result, learning, planning – S.T.A.R.L.P., Gibbs or Kolb). This paper will not discuss students moral developments levels or their ethical decision making, but, will only discuss the ‘reflection’, thus, the findings from this research come in twofold: (i) students acknowledged the new skills they gained, the development of other skills they had through their reflections, such as critical thinking, time management. (ii) Most of the students have demonstrated an understanding of reflection in higher education, and ethical decision making, through use of different frameworks. However, some students felt reflection is difficult, thus, the paper concludes with a recommendation to introduce reflection in the first year of university.

Details

Educating for Ethical Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-253-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Tom Russell

This chapter analyzes one teacher educator’s development of a pedagogy of reflection over a period of 25 years. My personal interpretation of the meaning of reflective…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes one teacher educator’s development of a pedagogy of reflection over a period of 25 years. My personal interpretation of the meaning of reflective practice leads to seven principles of a pedagogy of reflection that focus on relationship, listening, metacognition, modeling, and learning from experience. Justification of my pedagogy of reflection includes an account of books that influenced my development as a teacher educator and the insights gained from living and teaching in a different culture. Excerpts from and discussion of the work of two preservice teachers illustrate my pedagogy of reflection and emphasize the importance of replying supportively to each individual who shows awareness of the unique learning process involved in becoming a teacher. The research methodology of Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices supported the development of my pedagogy of reflection and helped me to overcome the conditions that can constrain that development.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part A)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-136-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Jia Beisi

Habraken points out that the architectural studio failed to bring students to basic questions in the architecture of everyday environments. Till criticizes that in a…

Abstract

Habraken points out that the architectural studio failed to bring students to basic questions in the architecture of everyday environments. Till criticizes that in a studio, it is only the professional value represented by the teachers that prevails. To investigate the reasons of the allegation, this paper introduces a learning model defined by David A. Kolb, in which a learning process consists of two dimensional movements: i.e., prehension (concrete experiences vs. abstract conceptualization) and transformation (reflection and experiment). The paper then inquires into Schön's observation in the studio learning mode characterized as reflection-in-action. It is found that this studio is mainly dealing with the transformation dimension, and prehension dimension is either suppressed or represented by the teacher's experiences and conceptions. The paper discovers that the cause of problems raised by Habraken and Till is the inherent lack of substance in the prehension dimension.

The paper assesses a studio programme in which the basic questions of built environment were systematically introduced. It analyzes the students' reactions and performance in line with students' learning styles found using Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI). It suggests that the students' learning activities are more diversified than what Schön could perceive. There is a possibility to adapt students' personal experience and abstract conceptualization which may play into the studio. By enhancing diversity of learning styles rather than letting one's learning style (reflection-in-action) prevail, the studio may become a platform in which students may learn from each other.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Steen Høyrup

The article presents a theoretical analysis of the concept of reflection. The author argues in favour of the necessity of conceiving the concept of reflection in a broad…

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12339

Abstract

The article presents a theoretical analysis of the concept of reflection. The author argues in favour of the necessity of conceiving the concept of reflection in a broad sense, and not using the concept in the meaning of introspection. To grasp reflection in its complexity and as a core process in organisational learning it is necessary to distinguish between different kinds of reflection – reflection and critical reflection – and different levels of reflection: individual, interaction level and reflection as organised practice. This terminology is used as lenses through which a case of organisational development of production groups is interpreted. This interpretation is related to criteria mentioned for organisational learning. It is concluded that most of the criteria are met. This way the concept of reflection may be a fruitful way of understanding organisational learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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