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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Phanish Puranam

Behavioral strategy aspires to build theories that are behaviorally plausible. However, the diversity of human behaviors can make it challenging to know what behavioral…

Abstract

Behavioral strategy aspires to build theories that are behaviorally plausible. However, the diversity of human behaviors can make it challenging to know what behavioral assumptions to use when building theories about organizations and their strategies. Fortunately, organizational contexts are, to varying degrees, designed. This introduces a powerful set of levers – sorting, framing, and structuring – that reduce this diversity of behavioral possibilities to a tractable yet plausible few. Attention to the organizational contexts that shape individual and group behavior can, therefore, help behavioral strategists attain their objectives of building theories with sound behavioral foundations.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Naz Onel and Avinandan Mukherjee

The potential underlying causal factors of environmental behaviours have been examined from various theoretical angles by mostly focusing on individual motivations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The potential underlying causal factors of environmental behaviours have been examined from various theoretical angles by mostly focusing on individual motivations in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model based on an integrative approach to better understand eco-sensitive consumer behaviours and their predictors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews distinct theoretical approaches and, based on the integrative perspective, develops a model using the framework of the goal framing theory (GFT).

Findings

On the basis of the GFT, the authors propose that 12 variables influence the pro-environmental behaviours of consumers: biospheric values, egoistic values, altruistic values, environmental concern, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, subjective norms, attitudes towards behaviour, perceived behavioural control, personal norms, affect, and behavioural intention. Furthermore, the authors categorize environmental behaviours based on three different stages of the consumption process of consumers: purchase, usage, and post-use.

Originality/value

The proposed model will offer future studies a holistic understanding of the factors that predict environmentally sensitive behaviours of consumers and the extent to which such behaviours depend on moral considerations, feelings, or self-interest motives.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Arpita Chakraborty, Manvendra Pratap Singh and Mousumi Roy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of university in shaping pro-environmental behaviour in students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of university in shaping pro-environmental behaviour in students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used goal-framing theory to investigate the relationship between goals and pro-environmental behaviour by comparing the responses of entry- and exit-level students. Structural equation modeling, one-way analysis of variance and other standard statistical analysis have been used to analyse the data collected through questionnaire survey in a central university offering technical education in India.

Findings

Pro-environmental intention in students increases with a strong normative goal. The direct and indirect effects indicate hedonic goal and gain goal via normative goal leads to better pro-environmental behaviour. Higher values for normative goal in exit-level students substantiates the role of university.

Practical implications

The paper provides scope to improvise and incorporate environmental practices into the habits of the students by aligning their goals and university dimensions including curriculum, campus operations, research and outreach activities.

Originality/value

The results make an important contribution in establishing a sustained green culture by offering a new university paradigm.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Pilar Arroyo and Lorena Carrete

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model where different motivational drivers are used to stimulate the intention of individuals to purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model where different motivational drivers are used to stimulate the intention of individuals to purchase green energy.

Design/methodology/approach

The goal-framing theory was used as the theoretical basis to design motivational statements that activate different self-goals driving the intention to adopt green energy. A field experiment was performed to investigate the influence of three different goal triggers on the intention of purchase green energy, specifically solar systems, among households living in a major city located in the central part of Mexico. The effect of demographics, environmental consciousness and perceived risk associated to the technology functionality was also considered in explaining the probability of purchase of a photovoltaic system in a short (one year) and medium (five years) terms.

Findings

The goal trigger grounded on normative motivations is the most influential on the probability of adoption of a photovoltaic system. However, the socioeconomic level of the household moderates the effect this type of goal trigger has on the intention of purchase a photovoltaic system. Individuals with a high socioeconomic level significantly increase their intention of purchase this green technology if motivated by a normative goal. On the contrary, individuals with a medium socioeconomic level are mostly motivated by goal triggers grounded on economic benefits.

Research limitations/implications

This study was circumscribed to a particular city of Mexico. Replication of the experiment in cities of other developing countries with contrasting sociotechnical contexts and the consideration of other green behaviours and explanatory variables is relevant to confirm and complement the results of this research.

Practical implications

The cost of photovoltaic systems represents a major barrier to the growth of the Mexican market of this renewable energy. Therefore, the promotion strategy for solar energy must be accompanied by the design of appropriate motivational drivers depending on the socioeconomic level of the segment and the time for the investment. Additionally, public and private strategies to decrease the cost of the technology and financing programs for individual and community projects are recommended.

Social implications

The willingness to use green energy and contribute to the protection of the environment should spring from within consumers. To upscale the solar energy market, it is relevant to understand the dominant goals of individuals when taking the decision to purchase green energy.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extant research in green marketing by proposing and testing a new interpretative framework to examine how the benefits of green energy activate the self-goals of consumers, thus influencing their intentions of adoption of green energy. A theoretical model is proposed by constructing “goal-triggers” grounded on the goal-framing theory and empirically testing in the specific case of explaining the intention of purchasing photovoltaic systems in Mexico.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Donia Waseem, Sergio Biggemann and Tony Garry

This paper aims to explore the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation. Specifically, it enhances the understanding of social and contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation. Specifically, it enhances the understanding of social and contextual elements that contribute towards the co-creation of value.

Design/methodology/approach

Embracing an interpretive paradigm, the study draws on 57 in-depth interviews together with participant observation field notes. The data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings identify six key drivers that motivate employees to facilitate value co-creation: rewards and recognition, opportunities for life-long learning, interpersonal engagement, role responsibility and accountability, organisational vision and social purpose.

Research limitations/implications

This study is undertaken within a traditional organisation setting. Other organisational contexts such as working from home should also be considered. Second, this study focused on the individual relational orientations of employees. Also, there is an opportunity to explore the collective orientation of employees.

Originality/value

Drawing on service-dominant logic (S-D logic) as a theoretical lens, this study adopts and adapts Lindenberg and Steg’s (2013) goal-framing theory to conceptualise six drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation within three-goal frames that leads to in-role and extra-role job performance.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Helen S. Du, Xiaobo Ke and Christian Wagner

This research draws on goal framing theory and gamification affordance to understand how gamification design encourages users' continuous usage of information systems (IS…

Abstract

Purpose

This research draws on goal framing theory and gamification affordance to understand how gamification design encourages users' continuous usage of information systems (IS) to perform proenvironmental behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data (N = 307) were collected from users of a gamified IS designed for environmental protection. The research model was examined with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Satisfying users' demand on green effectiveness, enjoyment, and social gain directly/indirectly predicts users' intention to continue to utilize the gamified IS for proenvironmental behaviors. Moreover, gamification affordance of autonomy support, visibility of achievement, competition, and interactivity influences the satisfaction of the users' relevant demands.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the IS research for environmental sustainability at the individual level. Specifically, this research extends the understanding of users' decision-making on continuance and the role of gamification design in the context of gamified IS developed for environmental conservation.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Thomas Keil, Pasi Kuusela and Nils Stieglitz

How do organizations respond to negative feedback regarding their innovation activities? In this chapter, the authors reconcile contradictory predictions stemming from…

Abstract

How do organizations respond to negative feedback regarding their innovation activities? In this chapter, the authors reconcile contradictory predictions stemming from behavioral learning and from the escalation of commitment (EoC) perspectives regarding persistence under negative performance feedback. The authors core argument suggests that the seemingly contradictory psychological processes indicated by these two perspectives occur simultaneously in decision makers but that the design of organizational roles and reward systems affects their prevalence in decision-making tasks. Specifically, the authors argue that for decision makers responsible for an individual project, responses given to negative performance feedback regarding a project are dominated by self-justification and loss-avoidance mechanisms predicted by the EoC literature, while for decision makers responsible for a portfolio of projects, responses to negative performance regarding a project are dominated by an under-sampling of poorly performing alternatives that behavioral learning theory predicts. In addition to assigning decision-making authority to different organizational roles, organizational designers shape the strength of these mechanisms through the design of reward systems and specifically by setting more or less ambiguous goals, aspiration levels, time horizons of incentives provided, and levels of failure tolerance.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Isak Barbopoulos and Lars-Olof Johansson

The purpose of the present research is to explore the (multi-) dimensionality of the highly influential gain, hedonic and normative master goals. Despite being important…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present research is to explore the (multi-) dimensionality of the highly influential gain, hedonic and normative master goals. Despite being important drivers of consumer behavior, few attempts have been made to incorporate these goals into a single measure.

Design/methodology/approach

Across three studies, the dimensionality of the gain, hedonic, and normative master goals are explored (Study 1), confirmed (Study 2) and validated (Study 3).

Findings

A structure of five distinct sub-goals emerged, which were shown to be related to the original higher-order goals: thrift and safety (related to the gain goal), moral and social norms (related to the normative goal) and instant gratification (related to the hedonic goal). These five dimensions were shown to have satisfactory convergent, discriminant and construct validity.

Research limitations/implications

The present research shows that consumer motivation is multi-dimensional, and that a distinction should be made not only between higher-order utilitarian, hedonic and normative determinants but also between their corresponding sub-goals, such as social and moral norms. A multi-dimensional approach to consumer motivation should prove useful in standard marketing research, as well as in the segmentation of consumer groups, products and settings.

Originality/value

The emergent dimensions encompass a broad range of research, from economics and marketing, to social and environmental psychology, providing consumer researchers and practitioners alike a more nuanced and psychologically accurate view on consumer motivation.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Constantine Imafidon Tongo

Collective work motivation (CWM) has been construed as humans’ innate predispositions to effectively undertake team-oriented work activities under ideal conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

Collective work motivation (CWM) has been construed as humans’ innate predispositions to effectively undertake team-oriented work activities under ideal conditions (Lindenberg and Foss, 2011). However, management research aimed at explicating its etiology in knowledge-based organizations (KBOs) has been largely ignored. Given that these organizations strive to gain market competitiveness by motivating employees to cooperatively share knowledge, as well as protect organizational specific knowledge from being externally expropriated, it becomes expedient to understand how they can mobilize and sustain CWM that is geared towards the normative goal of knowledge sharing and knowledge protection.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual insights from the social identity theory were deployed by the study.

Findings

Three hypothetical principles derived from the processes of social categorization, social comparison and social identification tentatively mobilize and sustain CWM in KBOs.

Originality/value

This paper adopts the social identity perspective to CWM. In so doing, it sees CWM as a team-based intrinsically derived process rather than an extrinsic means of eliciting the motivation of people in KBOs to engage in the normative goal of knowledge sharing and protection.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 21 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Abstract

Details

Organization Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-329-2

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