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Publication date: 27 June 2016

Seonaidh McDonald, Caroline J. Oates and Panayiota J. Alevizou

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which academic researchers frame and conduct sustainability research and to ask to what extent we are limited by these frames.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which academic researchers frame and conduct sustainability research and to ask to what extent we are limited by these frames.

Methodology/approach

Our approach is based on an epistemological critique. We begin with a discussion of the ways in which sustainable consumption has been conceptualised within marketing; we question the influence of positivist social science research traditions and examine how research on sustainability is impacted by the structure of academia.

Findings

Our critical reflection leads us to suggest three ways in which sustainability research might be re-framed: a reconsideration of language, a shift in the locus of responsibility and the adoption of a holistic approach.

Research implications

We propose that in order to make progress in sustainability research, alternative frames, terms, units of analysis, method(ologies) and research ambitions are needed.

Originality/value

By making visible our collective, unexamined assumptions, we can now move forward with new questions and agendas for sustainability research.

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Khan Md Raziuddin Taufique and Shahidul Islam

Rapid economic growth, urbanization, growing population and resulting overconsumption have led to the severe environmental vulnerability of some south Asian countries…

Abstract

Purpose

Rapid economic growth, urbanization, growing population and resulting overconsumption have led to the severe environmental vulnerability of some south Asian countries, further accelerated by the impact of climate change. Bangladesh is one such country that has been recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change as one of the most environmentally vulnerable in the world. A significant amount of environmental deterioration is reportedly due to consumption-related activities. This study, therefore, aims to understand the antecedents of green consumer behavior among young urban consumers, an emerging and environmentally promising market in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the theory of planned behavior to integrating environmental attitudes, subjective norms, perceived consumer effectiveness and behavioral intentions in its conceptual model to examine their influence on green consumer behavior. Data were collected from 206 young urban consumers (18–24 years of age) from the capital city of Bangladesh. Covariance based structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The subsequent results suggest that perceived consumer effectiveness and subjective norms have a direct positive influence on green consumer behavior, while the direct effect of environmental attitudes is insignificant.

Practical implications

Based on the key finding that one of the strongest antecedents is perceived consumer effectiveness, marketers could inspire young urban consumers by applying self-directed appeal to induce green consumer behavior.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies examining the antecedents of green consumption behavior using the framework of the theory of planned behavior that integrates both behavioral intention and reported behavior in the context of young urban consumers in South Asia. An insignificant direct influence of attitudes on green consumer behavior reinforces the attitude-behavior gap, specifically among young urban consumers in a collective society. The strong positive influence of perceived consumer effectiveness on green consumer behavior, on the other hand, extends the existing green consumer literature by empirically supporting the need for enhancing self-efficacy among young consumers to persuade them to practice green consumer behavior, especially where individuals face severe challenges of climate change and environmental deterioration.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Hadjer Troudi and Djamila Bouyoucef

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the verification of applicability of reasoned action theory to analyze consumer behavior in Algerian context; and second, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the verification of applicability of reasoned action theory to analyze consumer behavior in Algerian context; and second, the identification and analysis of factors influencing purchasing behavior in green food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors proposed a model based on reasoned action theory that combines two types of variables, the green marketing type and personal type, in order to predict purchasing behavior of green food. The authors have established a structural equations modeling, with a path analysis on a sample of 304 Algerian consumers from Algiers town.

Findings

The model was confirmed and the results showed how green marketing and personal factors influence the green food purchasing behavior in direct and indirect way, in presence of the mediating variables’ attitude toward green food and intention to buy green food.

Research limitations/implications

There is no database or any information concerning green consumption in Algerian context. There is a lack of information about green production in food field. The choice of reasoned action theory as a theory explaining the decision-making process leading to purchasing act is based on fact that the Algerian field of food sector is virgin of this type of analysis, so the authors thought it is appropriate to apply the reasoned action theory as a first initiative in this field. Also, a more recent and more innovative psychological theory should be applied in the future studies.

Practical implications

The study will give researchers interested in Algerian context a better understanding of consumer behavior, especially in green product case, and will open new paths for future research in the same field by the application of another psychological theory that is more recent and innovative; the study can open research paths for other fields as well, such as consumer behavior toward green cosmetic products in Algeria.

Social implications

The implications of this research can assist marketers for better positioning in green food market using the results indicated in research. The better understanding of factors influencing consumer purchasing behavior will encourage contractors to invest in this field in Algiers town context.

Originality/value

The study was established in a context where consumer market data of green food are non-existent, so the research represents an orientation to green food marketers toward a better positioning in relation to influence factors of their market target.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Nitika Sharma and Madan Lal

This study aims to presents the article regarding the influential role of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement to address green intention and behaviour gap among…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to presents the article regarding the influential role of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement to address green intention and behaviour gap among consumers, and how they attain self-exoneration because of the moral dilemma if any exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is based on semi-structured interviews, using constructivist grounded theory, which offers a platform to investigate, explore and discover psychosocial mechanism that operates among the consumers regarding the dimension of morality and green practices. In-depth exhaustive dialogues with Indian green consumers are set up to stimulate dialogue on the study.

Findings

Findings of the study shed light on the moral dilemma arising from internal and external inefficacy of consumers and disengagement of morality to save consumers from self-condemnation. Also, the study proffers the potential conceptual framework of moral inefficacy, moral disengagement and green buying behaviour of consumers. Eventually, the study mapped the morality matrix to explore the consequents of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement.

Research limitations/implications

The idiographic nature of qualitative research, particularly grounded theory may be considered as a research limitation as it follows limited generalizability. Moreover, the present research work is exploratory in nature and depends on the candour of researchers’ reactivity and understanding.

Practical implications

The study subjectively concludes the green behaviour of consumers and discusses the rationality behind green intentions and behaviour gap. Marketers can strategize consumer morality as an approach to enhance green buying behaviour of consumers by removing moral inefficacies and disengagements.

Social implications

It is crucial for marketers and society to understand the reasons behind non-green consumerism and accordingly cope up with the situation.

Originality/value

The study has been designed in a way to discuss the philosophy of morality and psychology of consumers on green consumption. To elicit the crux and conceptualization of morality and green purchasing framework using constructivist grounded theory is the exclusivity of this study. This paper explores green consumption pattern using moral orientation and processes in detail.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Yen Thi Hoang Nguyen and Hung Vu Nguyen

The paper aims to provide an alternative view to green consumption behaviors of millennials. In fact, studies on green consumption have usually assumed a common attitude…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to provide an alternative view to green consumption behaviors of millennials. In fact, studies on green consumption have usually assumed a common attitude–behavior model for different generations. Instead, the view in this paper highlights two other constructs, online product review and self-image congruence, as the key antecedents to the behavior among the generation.

Design/methodology/approach

To test our proposed model, an online survey with a sample of 305 millennials in Vietnam was conducted. The sample shares similar demographic features with the millennials in the country. The data were collected in popular social networks and then validated before being analyzed with AMOS.

Findings

The model analysis results provided supports for the key roles of online product review and self-image congruence among millennials. In particular, online product review was found to have both direct and mediational impacts on green product purchase intention. Self-image congruence was also found to be a key antecedent to the intention.

Research limitations/implications

The model in this paper only examined the purchase intention. Moreover, only a single sample of millennials in Vietnam was investigated. Future research may incorporate the green consumption behavior to enhance the external validity and/or directly compare models for different generations or across countries to further confirm the differential generational patterns.

Practical implications

The paper includes recommendations for managers to use the online channels and to promote green product self-matching among millennials. These recommendations are not contrary to but go beyond the frequently suggested ones for attitude-related training or communication campaigns for green consumption.

Originality/value

This paper fills an identified gap to provide an alternative view to green consumption behaviors of millennials. Different from the common attitude–behavior view in green consumption research, two key constructs of online product review and self-image congruence are highlighted for the generation in this paper.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

S M Fatah Uddin and Mohammed Naved Khan

– The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect green purchasing behaviour (GPB) of young Indian consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect green purchasing behaviour (GPB) of young Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 161 young Indian consumers between age group of 15 and 18 years residing in northern region of the country were surveyed employing researcher controlled sampling. Data was collected thorough structured refined research instrument that comprised scales to measure various facets of green purchasing behaviour using five point Likert scale. The research instrument also included questions for generating demographic profile of respondents. For the purpose of meeting the study objectives, research hypotheses, well-grounded in relevant theory were empirically tested using appropriate statistical tools.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) revealed existence of five underlying factors namely green purchasing behaviour, environmental involvement, environmental attitude, environmental consciousness and perceived effectiveness of environmental behaviour that affect green purchasing behaviour of young urban consumers in India. Green purchasing behaviour and its variation across demographic variables has been ascertained by testing the considered hypotheses.

Research limitations/implications

The results may not be providing generalizability.

Practical/implications

This paper is expected to provide valuable insights in the area of green purchasing behaviour of young Indian urban consumers which can be of immense help to domestic and international marketers in dovetailing their marketing strategies and developing appropriate promotional messages.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to provide a glimpse into the nature of green purchasing behaviour of young urban Indian consumers which has been scantily researched. Also the gender differences among young Indian consumers regarding green attitudes contributes to the worth of literature.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Arpita Khare and Geetika Varshneya

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a survey carried out in three major metropolitan cities and a sample of total 889 respondents was collected who were college students in India.

Findings

Past environment-friendly behaviour influenced Indian youth’s organic clothing purchase behaviour. Green apparel knowledge and peer influence, interestingly, had no impact on organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited to students who had past experience with green products. This was deliberately done as the objective was to examine the influence of past environment-friendly behaviour and green apparel knowledge on organic clothing purchase behaviour. Youth with limited awareness about organic clothing were not contacted. This restricted the findings to a specific youth segment. Further, the study was limited to Indian youth and did not examine the purchase behaviour of other consumer segments. Demographic variables were not used for analysis as only purchase behaviour of young people as a consumer segment was studied.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by organic apparel manufacturers in marketing organic clothing brands to the Indian youth. Organic clothing can be positioned to emphasise green values and distinct lifestyle for environment-conscious youths. Initiatives like celebrity talk-shows, organic clothing exhibitions, and launch of organic clothing designer brands can be used to promote organic apparel. College students can be used as opinion leaders to communicate benefits of organic clothing and inculcate green values among larger population.

Originality/value

Organic products and brands are becoming popular among Indian consumers. There has been limited research on the subject of youths’ purchase behaviour of organic clothing to date. Companies trying to launch organic clothing brands in the country may find the results helpful in understanding green buying behaviour.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Lorena Carrete, Raquel Castaño, Reto Felix, Edgar Centeno and Eva González

The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of deeper motivations and inhibitors of green consumer behavior in the context of emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of deeper motivations and inhibitors of green consumer behavior in the context of emerging economies. Based on the findings, it aims to provide implications for marketers and policy making.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an ethnographic approach, in‐depth interviews and observational data were used to study 15 Mexican families from four urban regions of Mexico with different incomes. Thematic analysis was used to develop and validate themes and codes.

Findings

The findings highlight three dominant themes related to uncertainty in the adoption of environmentally‐friendly behaviors: consumer confusion, trust and credibility, and compatibility. Overall, green behaviors seem to be ingrained in the traditional heritage of savings and frugality rather than based on strong environmental values. It is suggested that the factors that drive consumers from positive attitudes and intentions to the actual adoption of green behaviors are a combination of perceived personal benefits, decreased perceived risk and uncertainty, a sense of control over costs, and a decomposition and reconstruction of deeply embedded cultural values and practices.

Practical implications

Policy makers and marketers are advised to build on collaborative efforts in order to facilitate comprehension and adoption of environmentally‐friendly behaviors and green products. In order to construct modernity alongside environmental responsibility, it seems indispensable to provide affordable lower‐priced alternatives for the low‐income segments of the market which constitute the vast majority of the population in emerging economies.

Originality/value

Being one of very few available qualitative studies on green consumer behavior, this study delves into the tension between modernity and traditional heritage in the context of emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environmental attitudes, social and personal environmental norms, social influence, and green self-identity on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environmental attitudes, social and personal environmental norms, social influence, and green self-identity on Indian consumersgreen buying behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through self-administered survey method by contacting respondents through mall intercept technique in six cities across India.

Findings

The findings suggest that green self-identity, peer influence, and past green buying behaviour influence the decision to purchase green product. Consumers’ self-identification with environment-friendly traits was a major predictor to green buying behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Influence of social groups, personal norms, and self-identity were examined. However, the study did not focus on any specific brand or product category. Issues like green brands, price sensitivity, and trust can be examined.

Practical implications

The findings can help firms in understanding Indian consumers’ predisposition and attitudes towards green products. Green products should be related to individual’s identity and ecological beliefs. Firms can modify their marketing communication strategies by linking green products them with social and personal factors.

Originality/value

Influence of factors like past environmental attitudes, social and personal norms on green buying have not been examined in Indian context. The study adds to existing literature by applying self-construal theory in explaining green buying behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Morteza Maleki Minbashrazgah, Fatemeh Maleki and Maedeh Torabi

Developing green consumption, organic and green meat and poultry consumption have been increased recently. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of food’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing green consumption, organic and green meat and poultry consumption have been increased recently. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of food’s sensory characteristics (e.g. organic food beliefs) and non-food factors (e.g. price transparency) on consumersgreen purchase behavior. So, according to the moderating role of price transparency, affecting factors on green chicken purchase intention and behavior are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Evaluating the model, the authors used measures from previous research. The authors distributed questionnaire in four chain stores in four different geographical regions in Tehran. The structural model and relations were examined by using Smart PLS 2.0 software to simultaneously estimate the measurement and structural models.

Findings

Structural equation analysis revealed that level of trust, consumer’s organic food beliefs and perceived environmental responsibility have positive impact on green purchase intention. Also price transparency moderator role confirmed that moderators can affect consumers’ actual behavior.

Research limitations/implications

As our sample was just from Tehran, the research results may lack generalizability to all people in Iran. Therefore, future researchers are encouraged to retest the proposed model in other cities and also in other countries with different level of economic development.

Practical implications

This paper includes suggestions for managers and producers to develop green food products consumption especially green chicken. Also it has implications for spreading out green consumption among people with high environmental involvement.

Originality/value

Despite conducted research, the moderating role of price transparency has been used only rarely to investigate consumersgreen purchase behavior.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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