Search results

1 – 10 of over 20000
Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Basak Denizci Guillet, Anna S. Mattila, Zixi (Lavi) Peng and Yixing (Lisa) Gao

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interactive effect of timing and framing of hotel’s upselling message on consumer attitudes toward the message. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interactive effect of timing and framing of hotel’s upselling message on consumer attitudes toward the message. The mediating role of reactance between the timing of upselling message and consumer attitudes is also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (timing: immediately after the booking vs one week prior to arrival) by 2 (framing: concrete vs abstract) experimental design was used. A total of 250 Chinese consumers were recruited and were randomly exposed to a hotel online upselling scenario. The consumer attitudes and reactance were measured.

Findings

When the framing of upselling message involves specific room attributes, consumers show more favorable attitudes when receiving the promotion one week prior to arrival (vs immediately after the booking). However, when the framing of upselling message involves price, consumer attitudes do not differ across the time of receiving the promotion. Reactance mediates the effect of message timing on consumer attitudes when the message framing involves specific room attributes.

Practical implications

This research suggests that hotel managers should offer concrete message framing that includes specific room attributes at the time proximal to consumers’ arrival to increase acceptance of online room upselling. In addition, it is important for hotel managers to take consumers’ reactance into consideration when developing an online upselling strategy.

Originality/value

Research on online hotel room upselling is scant. This study adds to the upselling literature by examining the joint influence of timing and framing of upselling promotions on consumer attitudes toward such messages. Furthermore, this study extends our understanding of the role of reactance in the online upselling process.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Zhengxiang Wu, Tingting Guo and Baoku Li

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of framing idle item recycling appeals as gains or losses on influencing consumers' idle item recycling intention by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of framing idle item recycling appeals as gains or losses on influencing consumers' idle item recycling intention by assessing the mediating role of perceived impact and the moderating role of product attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, three experiments were conducted to gather data. The assumed hypotheses were verified using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and bootstrap analysis.

Findings

Study 1 illustrated that loss-framed messages are more persuasive than gain-framed messages for less-involved consumers in idle item recycling, whereas message framing shows no significant difference in more-involved consumers' intention. Study 2 suggested that perceived impact tends to increase less-involved consumers' recycling intention when the message is framed as loss. Study 3 demonstrated that less-involved consumers would react to idle item recycling messages when they are strongly attached to a product. Further, gain-framed messages are more efficacious than loss-framed messages in influencing more-involved consumers' recycling intention when they are strongly attached to a product.

Originality/value

Previous research focuses on promoting waste recycling behavior initiated by local, city or national governments. This study provides some of the first evidence on the influence mechanism of message framing on consumers' idle item recycling intention and offers insights into companies to develop effective advertising strategies for idle item recycling management.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

David S. Dobson and Karolien Poels

Mortgage lenders often combine a variety of framing strategies when developing mortgage advertisements. To date, these frames have mostly been studied separately. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Mortgage lenders often combine a variety of framing strategies when developing mortgage advertisements. To date, these frames have mostly been studied separately. This paper, however, studies the combined framing effects of message valence, specificity, and temporality on consumers' mortgage decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods design was used. First, 13 unique print ads collected from a Canadian newspaper were analyzed for content. Second, a 2 × 2 × 2 scenario-based experiment with 400 undergraduate participants examined the framing effects of valence, specificity and temporality on attitudes toward the mortgage advertising message, the product advertised, and the brand, as well as on consumers' behavioral intentions toward the advertised mortgage product.

Findings

The content analysis suggests that combined framing does exist in print ads. A positive message with a fixed term and a specific interest rate were the most commonly used frames. The experiment revealed that, for behavioral intentions, the main effect of the message temporality was significant. The effects of advertising a long-term mortgage on behavioral intentions were more favorable than those of advertising a short-term mortgage.

Practical implications

This research provides a combined framing model for designing advertising strategies for the financial services industry to market complex financial products, such as mortgage loans to consumers. This is relevant to lenders when designing a persuasive package or ads for potential customers.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to investigate the effects of combinations of message frames on consumers' mortgage decision-making, while also advancing the understanding of message framing theory for the financial services industry.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Eyal Gamliel and Ram Herstein

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same…

2739

Abstract

Purpose

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same amount of money. This study seeks to examine whether consumers would show more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal framed negatively (“lose if you don't purchase”) relative to the conventional positive frame (“save if you purchase”).

Design/methodology/approach

The purchase intentions of 189 participants, randomly assigned to either a positively or a negatively framed message, were examined. The participants' perceived monetary gain in the deal and their involvement in the issue were also measured.

Findings

Presented with a negative relative to positive frame, participants showed more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal, and perceived their monetary gain as higher. Highly involved and lowly involved participants exhibited similar framing effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings regarding lowly involved participants are inconsistent with previous findings. Future research is needed to clarify whether the message framing effect interacts with involvement in predicting purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal.

Practical implications

The theoretical explanation of the phenomenon presented in this study predicts that negative framing of messages will also be more effective in other consumer behaviour contexts.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical demonstration of the effect of message framing on the effectiveness of price deal offers, suggesting that retailers should re‐examine their conventional presentation of price deal offers in terms of gains, and consider rephrasing them in terms of loss.

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Line Schmeltz

– The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

2470

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative study in the form of an online survey strongly inspired by classical experimental design.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that explicit communication of CSR framed as a corporate competence, and to some extent also as something personally relevant to the receivers, positively impacts evaluations of CSR messages and the companies behind them.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that CSR messages could increasingly emphasize corporate competence with a lesser focus on moral ideas and commitments, and that framing strategies can be effective in creating CSR messages that will be positively evaluated by young consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes by providing new insights into how value-based framing of CSR messages can increase credibility and relevance and thus help facilitate the complicated task of communicating CSR by way of suggesting a new CSR communication strategy framework.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Eyal Gamliel and Ram Herstein

Consumers frequently have to choose between products that differ in price and quality. This study aims to hypothesize that involvement would moderate the effect of message

1112

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers frequently have to choose between products that differ in price and quality. This study aims to hypothesize that involvement would moderate the effect of message framing on consumers' perceived monetary gain when considering cheaper products, as well as on product choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 238 participants were randomly assigned to either a positively or a negatively framed message, and either a high or low involvement condition.

Findings

The study finds that presented with a negative relative to positive frame, highly involved participants perceived a higher monetary gain when purchasing the cheaper product; no corresponding differences were found for low‐involved participants. Message framing did not affect either highly or low‐involved participants' product choice.

Research limitations/implications

Explanations for the results are offered and future research is suggested in order to determine whether the effect of message framing on the perceived monetary gain of highly involved consumers choosing cheaper products does affect their product choice.

Practical implications

If future research confirms this hypothesis, both retailers and highly involved consumers should consider the possible effect of message framing on the perceived monetary gain and on the choice between products that differ in price and quality.

Originality/value

This study is the first demonstration of the moderating effect of involvement on the effect of message framing on consumers' perceived monetary gain when choosing between products that differ in price and quality.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Hsuan-Hsuan Ku, Po-Hsiang Yang and Chia-Lun Chang

Marketers may proactively give customers personalized notices regarding their progress toward certain rewards as a means to stimulate ongoing behaviors. This paper aims to…

1100

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers may proactively give customers personalized notices regarding their progress toward certain rewards as a means to stimulate ongoing behaviors. This paper aims to investigate the effect on customer repatronage intention by framed messages concerning either goal-distance or consequences of an action and it also seeks to identify important variables moderating those responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Five between-subjects experiments examined how participants’ repatronage intentions, in response to the framing of goal-distance (Study 1a) and consequences of an action (Study 2a), varied as a function of their level of progress toward goal completion and also tested if the framing effects might be attenuated when relationship benefit was high rather than low (Studies 1b and 2b). They further adopted perceived reciprocity as an underlying mechanism for examining the interplay between these two kinds of framing in stimulating ongoing behavior (Study 3).

Findings

Although messages which emphasized what individuals need to spend more to attain a reward (versus how short they are from earning a reward) or loss following inaction (versus gain following action) were likely to erode intention, such effects were confined to individuals with a moderate level of progress. This intention-eroding effect was further attenuated by attractive reward. The persuasive advantages of short-from-the-end framing of goal-distance over more-to-the-end counterparts were found to be diminished when paired with a loss-framed message concerning consequences of an action. Furthermore, the observed effects on intention were mediated by perceived reciprocity.

Originality/value

The studies add to the current understanding of how the way in which information is presented might enhance loyalty or fail to do so.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Lu Zhang and Wan Yang

The main purpose of the current research is to investigate the effectiveness of messages sent out by firms inviting customers to write online reviews. The joint effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the current research is to investigate the effectiveness of messages sent out by firms inviting customers to write online reviews. The joint effect of message framing, power and individuals’ need for status (NFS) on consumers’ intentions to write a review was examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a 2 (message framing: self-vs other-focused) × 2 (power state: high vs low) × 2 (NFS: high vs low) factorial design with message framing being manipulated and power and NFS being measured.

Findings

The results show that customers low in power are more likely to be persuaded by a message focused on others (vs self), and customers high in power show similar levels of behavioral intention regardless of message framing. Furthermore, this effect is significant only among those with a high (vs low) NFS.

Practical implications

Hospitality practitioners may consider customizing the invitation message based on target consumers’ individual traits. They may either prime consumers’ status seeking intentions and/or sense of power, or gain such insights through outside marketing research companies. Depending on the characteristics of the recipients, companies can choose either a self-focused or an other-focused message to increase its persuasiveness.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies examining the joint effect of message framing, power and NFS on consumers’ willingness to write online reviews.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Sarah Alhouti, Scott A. Wright and Thomas L. Baker

Service failures are common and companies must decide how best to respond to these incidents. The purpose of this study is to examine service recovery efforts that…

Abstract

Purpose

Service failures are common and companies must decide how best to respond to these incidents. The purpose of this study is to examine service recovery efforts that incorporate a donation component, in addition to financial compensation. More specifically, the relative effectiveness of these recovery efforts was explored according to the regulatory focus framing (i.e. prevention- or promotion-focused) of the donation message.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments are conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Drawing from regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997), the authors determined that prevention framing (e.g. highlighting the negative outcomes avoided by a donation) leads to better service recovery outcomes compared to promotion framing (e.g. highlighting the positive outcomes of a donation) the donation message. Furthermore, warmth (e.g. perceptions of caring and helpfulness) and competence (e.g. perceptions of capability and usefulness) underlie this effect and message trust moderates the effect of regulatory framing on warmth.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers several theoretical and managerial implications. First, a novel recovery approach that benefits multiple stakeholders was illustrated, particularly when the donation message is prevention (vs promotion) framed. The authors focused on donations in particular, but future researchers should explore other corporate social responsibility activities such as those pertaining to sustainability, ethical labor practices or educational training.

Practical implications

Companies should consider incorporating donations into service recovery efforts. Moreover, companies should use prevention as opposed to promotion frames in their donation messages. Using a prevention frame enhances perceptions of company warmth and competence.

Originality/value

Very little research has explored the effectiveness of donations following service failures despite evidence that companies use donations in this context. This research highlights the importance of regulatory focus framing and demonstrates how a donation, paired with financial compensation, is more/less effective according to the framing of the communication. Thus, this research demonstrates a novel effect, identifies its underlying mechanism through warmth and competence and establishes an important boundary condition according to message trust.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2022

Young Kim and Myoung-Gi Chon

The purpose of this study was to shed light on how effective environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication can be achieved through persuasive…

34

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to shed light on how effective environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication can be achieved through persuasive communication strategies using message framing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an online experimental study with a 2 (narrative: narrative or non-narrative) × 2 (framing: gain or loss) between-subjects design.

Findings

The findings showed that environmental CSR communication using narrative framing messages is most effective in creating strong CSR associations between a company and the environmental CSR domain and sharing the company's CSR information on supportive communication and advocating for the environmental campaign.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of a company's environmental CSR communication efforts using the right message format (narrative style) to increase its persuasive sequence from CSR evaluation to supportive behaviors, contributing to theoretical development in the research of environmental CSR communication. This study suggests that environmental CSR campaign managers should first formalize the company's environmental responsiveness by clearly establishing policies and practicing CSR performance that could result in a strong CSR association before asking their target publics to engage in pro-environmental activities.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 20000