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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Naz Onel and Avinandan Mukherjee

The purpose of this paper is to examine five different types of eco-sensitive behaviours separately and understand if determinants of these behaviours vary depending on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine five different types of eco-sensitive behaviours separately and understand if determinants of these behaviours vary depending on the type of action being performed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates factors influencing five different eco-sensitive behaviours by empirically testing the effects of socio-economic status (SES), gender, age and environmental values. Theoretically guided hypotheses and models were formulated and tested with multiple linear regression models by employing a data set from the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) 2010 General Social Survey.

Findings

Results conclude that different types of behaviour have different predictors. While age differences only explain recycling cans and bottles, gender difference explains buying pesticide-free fruits/vegetables and avoiding environmentally harmful products. Values, on the other hand, predict all five eco-behaviours. Driving less and saving water for environmental reasons were least explained by the examined predictors.

Originality/value

These results contribute to untangling the confusing research evidence on the effects of SES, age, gender and environmental values on different environmental behaviours and on the relationship between them by examining each behaviour separately.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Naz Onel and Avinandan Mukherjee

The potential underlying causal factors of environmental behaviours have been examined from various theoretical angles by mostly focusing on individual motivations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The potential underlying causal factors of environmental behaviours have been examined from various theoretical angles by mostly focusing on individual motivations in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model based on an integrative approach to better understand eco-sensitive consumer behaviours and their predictors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews distinct theoretical approaches and, based on the integrative perspective, develops a model using the framework of the goal framing theory (GFT).

Findings

On the basis of the GFT, the authors propose that 12 variables influence the pro-environmental behaviours of consumers: biospheric values, egoistic values, altruistic values, environmental concern, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, subjective norms, attitudes towards behaviour, perceived behavioural control, personal norms, affect, and behavioural intention. Furthermore, the authors categorize environmental behaviours based on three different stages of the consumption process of consumers: purchase, usage, and post-use.

Originality/value

The proposed model will offer future studies a holistic understanding of the factors that predict environmentally sensitive behaviours of consumers and the extent to which such behaviours depend on moral considerations, feelings, or self-interest motives.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Naz Onel and Avinandan Mukherjee

Environmental behavior studies suggest that knowledge, in addition to other psychological and social factors, can play an important role in consumers’ environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental behavior studies suggest that knowledge, in addition to other psychological and social factors, can play an important role in consumers’ environmental behavior change. The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between knowledge and various psychological factors which encourage consumers’ participation in pro-environmental behaviors. The relationships that link an individual’s attitudes toward science, environmental values, different types of knowledge (i.e. scientific facts, environmental facts, and subjective environmental knowledge), environmental risk perception, and willingness to pay (WTP) for the environment with pro-environmental behavior were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically guided hypotheses and model were formulated and tested with multiple linear regression models. The study was based on measures and data obtained from the large-sample secondary database of the 2010 General Social Survey (n=2,044).

Findings

Results indicated that while attitudes toward science had direct effects on knowledge of scientific facts and knowledge of environmental facts, environmental values showed effects on knowledge of environmental facts and subjective knowledge on environmental issues. The results also indicated that from different types of knowledge, subjective knowledge on environmental issues had effects on both environmental risk perception and WTP for the environment. Knowledge on environmental facts, on the other hand, was able to predict only environmental risk perception. The scientific factual knowledge did not show an effect on mediator of pro-environmental behavior. Also, subjective knowledge indicated indirect effects on pro-environmental behavior through environmental risk perception and WTP for the environment.

Originality/value

Although research on understanding factors influencing pro-environmental behaviors and potential relations to individual knowledge has grown in recent years, there has been very little attempt at distinguishing between different types of knowledge and investigating their potential roles in the context of environmentally relevant behaviors. This study will help understand the functioning of different types of consumer environmental knowledge and their impacts on pro-environmental behaviors more in depth.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Esther P.Y. Yam‐Tang and Ricky Y.K. Chan

The green movement in newly industrialized countries often lags behind the West. While the green awareness has started to rise rapidly in some of these countries, the…

Abstract

The green movement in newly industrialized countries often lags behind the West. While the green awareness has started to rise rapidly in some of these countries, the ability of attitudes to predict behaviour for environmentally sensitive products is questionable. A survey of 552 Hong Kong citizens was conducted to examine how consistent consumers’ actions were with their attitudes towards seven environmentally sensitive products. The results have shown that consumers’ environmental concern is not reflected in their purchasing behaviour. This calls for more education and initiative from both the government and businessmen to induce people to channel their attitudes into actions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Tahir Albayrak, Şafak Aksoy and Meltem Caber

The aims of the study are: to compare the environmental concern and scepticism levels of the participants and whether or not they display green purchase behaviour; to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of the study are: to compare the environmental concern and scepticism levels of the participants and whether or not they display green purchase behaviour; to investigate the influence of environmental concern and scepticism on green purchase behaviour by utilizing the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from participant and non‐participant customers of the e‐invoicing program of Turk Telecom. Customers were clustered into four groups according to their environmental concerns and scepticism levels.

Findings

Research results show that those customers who have a high level of environmental concern and less sceptical reflect a positive attitude, have a high positive subjective norm and perceived behavioural control that motivates them to have stronger intentions to become e‐invoice subscribers in the near future.

Originality/value

The results found in the paper provide clear evidence supporting the Theory of Planned Behaviour in Turkey. Moreover, while most previous studies have employed undergraduate samples which are not representative of common customers, the present study employed a large and real customer sample which strongly represents customers in general.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Cagri Bulut, Murat Nazli, Erhan Aydin and Adnan Ul Haque

This study aims to demonstrate how greenwashing perceptions shape the effect of environmental concern on post-millennials purchasing behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate how greenwashing perceptions shape the effect of environmental concern on post-millennials purchasing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 174 responses gathered through a street survey method from 5 different universities in Turkey, data are analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences software (SPSS 16.0). Principal component analysis is performed to assess the differentiation in factors. Multiple regression analysis is used to examine the effects of the items on the post-millennials purchasing and recommendation behavior.

Findings

The main findings revealed that the environmental concern trait of post-millennials triggers their green purchasing behavior. When the concern on green products is high, the awareness of perceiving that “if the product is actually green or pretending to be green” is high. When the post-millennials take the greenwashing perception into account, their environmental concern has lower effects on their green behavior. The moderating role of greenwashing between environmental concern and green purchasing is apparent. Greenwashing perception decreases the effects of environmental concern on green behavior.

Originality/value

The research raises the concept of greenwashing perception that moderates the relationship between environmental concern and post-millennials purchasing behavior. This study also demonstrates that greenwashing awareness has a critical role in creating a purchasing behavior of post-millennials that have environmental concerns.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Bridget Martin and Antonis C. Simintiras

The literature examining the behaviour of environmentally consciousconsumers has focused mainly on the examination of non‐product specificenvironmental knowledge and…

Abstract

The literature examining the behaviour of environmentally conscious consumers has focused mainly on the examination of non‐product specific environmental knowledge and attitudes or environmental knowledge and attitudes in relation to single product lines. Employs the constructs of product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes, that is knowledge of and attitudes towards the green products and their impact on the environment. Presents the results of an exploratory study examining the relationship between product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes for multiple green product lines, testing hypotheses generated from the literature, utilizing a questionnaire measuring self‐reports of environmental knowledge and attitudes. The results show no direct relationship exists between product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes, and that consumers do not simply believe that a green product is good for the environment without also knowing how the product impacts on the environment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Bodo B. Schlegelmilch, Greg M. Bohlen and Adamantios Diamantopoulos

A review of the literature suggests that traditional segmentation variables (socio‐demographics) and personality indicators are of limited use for characterizing the green…

Abstract

A review of the literature suggests that traditional segmentation variables (socio‐demographics) and personality indicators are of limited use for characterizing the green consumer. Explores the extent to which variables, specific to environmental consciousness, are better able to explain consumers’ pro‐environmental purchasing behaviour. Two conceptualizations of the purchasing domain are addressed, namely general green purchasing behaviour and specific purchasing habits relating to five green product categories. Two data sets are used in the analysis, namely marketing students and members of the United Kingdom general public. Suggests that measures of environmental consciousness are closely linked to environmentally‐responsible purchasing behaviour, although the strength of the relationships varies according to sample type, the conceptualization of the purchasing domain and the particular product category at issue.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Hae Jin Gam

Previous studies regard purchasing of environmentally friendly clothing (EFC) as a subset of environmental behavior. However, like all clothing, EFC also reflects a…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies regard purchasing of environmentally friendly clothing (EFC) as a subset of environmental behavior. However, like all clothing, EFC also reflects a consumer's fashion choices, and the many variables that influence EFC purchase decisions must be understood for apparel companies to effectively market eco‐friendly products. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify whether fashion and shopping orientation are determinants of EFC purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to examine the effects of fashion orientation, shopping orientation, and environmental concern and eco‐friendly behavior on purchase intention of EFC. A total of 329 usable questionnaires were collected from young female consumers aged 18‐25 years.

Findings

Factor analysis was used to evaluate both independent variables – predictors: fashion orientation, shopping orientation, environmental concern, and eco‐friendly behavior – and the dependent variable – purchase intention regarding EFC. The findings from a series of linear regression analyses indicated that one fashion orientation factor, two shopping orientation factors, and three environmental concern and eco‐friendly behavior factors are significantly related to consumers' purchase intention regarding EFC.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study are limited to young female consumers in the midwestern USA.

Practical implications

This study suggests that the apparel industry should provide an enjoyable retail environment to attract young EFC consumers.

Originality/value

Fashion and shopping orientation have not been utilized to explain consumers' purchase intention regarding EFC. This study suggests some effective marketing approaches to apparel companies, as well as strategies for developing successful sustainable apparel products that consumers will purchase.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Simge Emekci

The purpose of this study is to explain the factors that affect the green buying behaviours and the relations between these factors. For this purpose, three main factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain the factors that affect the green buying behaviours and the relations between these factors. For this purpose, three main factors were added to the Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to develop a more comprehensive model, namely, environmental concern, environmental knowledge and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE). It is believed that these variables could help understanding the green buying behaviour and extending the TPB model.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, quantitative research has been made to test the relations in the proposed model. The target population in this research is individuals living in Turkey, both sexes of age over 18 years. The data were collected through an online survey between May and August of 2017. The data were statistically analysed with structural equation modelling and interpreted using the statistical software AMOS version 20.0.

Findings

The findings show that PCE is the variable that has the highest influence on the attitudes towards behaviour, intentions and green buying behaviour in the proposed model. It is possible to say that the PCE variable added to the model is an important variable that improved and strengthened the measurement model. Variables added to the model are compatible with Ajzen’s original model.

Research limitations/implications

The obtained data may not be generalised throughout Turkey. However, it is believed that the data obtained can give a general idea for green buying behaviour of individuals in Turkey.

Practical implications

The obtained data provide a contribution to the marketing communication experts and the literature. Research findings contribute to explaining green consumption behaviours in developing countries.

Originality/value

In this research, the gap between consumers’ attitudes and their behaviours has been researched. Understanding the reason for this gap is essential to increase green consumption in developing countries. The number of studies in this field in Turkey is not very much. For this reason, this study is thought to contribute to the field.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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