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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Ron Sanchez and D. Sudharshan

Use by some firms of a revolutionary new form of market research,here termed “real‐time market research”, has been observedin certain dynamic product markets where…

Abstract

Use by some firms of a revolutionary new form of market research, here termed “real‐time market research”, has been observed in certain dynamic product markets where technologies and consumer preferences change rapidly. In real‐time product research, firms produce small lots of new product models and research consumer reaction by offering product model variations to consumers. This product research has been made economically feasible by the development of methods for shortening the time required for product development, by the adoption of flexible manufacturing systems, and by the rise of important new regimes for designing products. Documents the apparent use of real‐time market research by some firms and discusses the new product design regimes which make real‐time research feasible and economic.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Lynn R. Kahle

The real‐time response survey can be viewed as a dialectic elaboration of the focus group and the sample survey, incorporating some of the advantages of each and producing…

Abstract

The real‐time response survey can be viewed as a dialectic elaboration of the focus group and the sample survey, incorporating some of the advantages of each and producing a program of research quickly. An evaluation of the methodology shows its predictive utility from: real‐time response purchase intentions to self‐reported actual purchases of common commodities seven days later (r = 0.97); real‐time response purchase intentions to self‐reported actual purchases of new products six months later (r = 0.94); and an index of three real‐time response ratings of a product (purchase intention, price, and extent to which product is new and different) by residents of Cincinnati to national sales data for the following year (r = 0.45). Considers some advantages and disadvantages of the methodology. It can be quite useful in new product development.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Petri Suomala

The essential investments in new product development (NPD) made by industrial companies entail effective management of NPD activities. In this context, performance…

Abstract

The essential investments in new product development (NPD) made by industrial companies entail effective management of NPD activities. In this context, performance measurement is one of the means that can be employed in the pursuit of effectiveness.

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Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Jeffrey F. Durgee, Gina Colarelli O’Connor and Robert W. Veryzer

Develops and refines a new way to generate and identify opportunities for really new product functions. Considers that the role played by marketing research in really new

Abstract

Develops and refines a new way to generate and identify opportunities for really new product functions. Considers that the role played by marketing research in really new products is limited. Traditional marketing research methods here are largely confined to asking people about problems with current products, watching them use these products and asking them to use new prototypes in extended use tests. Describes a new method for identifying new consumer or industrial product functions. Target consumers for a given category are exposed to 300 mini‐concepts. Concepts consist of verb‐object combinations describing possible new functions in that category. Concludes that once key needs or opportunities are identified for a given category, the next step is to determine which current or new technologies are required to address these needs.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Raymond J. Lawrence

New products are seldom really new. Yet modellers of adoption processes have largely ignored the effects of existing buying habits on first trial of a product. A standard…

Abstract

New products are seldom really new. Yet modellers of adoption processes have largely ignored the effects of existing buying habits on first trial of a product. A standard renewal process model is shown to fit data on cumulative shoppers at a new store, in conjunction with lognormal buying frequency assumptions. The penetration curves so derived lie close to the widely used modified exponential, which therefore obtains a rationale. Such curves represent the normal rise in penetration, as a proportion of shoppers enter the market in accordance with their regular cycle of repurchase. Most products are bought in this way. Few are really new, in a sense defined and discussed. Yet model builders have persistently used the framework of adoption processes, ignoring the influence of a repurchase cycle. They have instead assumed that new product adoption is “driven” by forces such as weight of advertising. From the position of a devil's advocate, it is arguable that these assumptions are misguided. Marketing mix variables are not sufficient or adequate to explain the growth rate of products which are not genuine innovations.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Martin Fojt

It is all too easy in the hectic world of business to get too involved with the day‐to‐day managing of processes and events. When this happens it is difficult to see the…

Abstract

It is all too easy in the hectic world of business to get too involved with the day‐to‐day managing of processes and events. When this happens it is difficult to see the wood for the trees and the automatic pilot syndrome takes over. This does not suggest that you do not know what you are doing ‐ on the contrary you are probably as switched on to whatever activity you are managing as anyone could be. What you could be missing, however, is the explanation as to why you are doing it. If this sounds familiar to you, what might be needed is a detached period from your work. By this I mean stay on the high ground for a while so you can get an overview of what you are doing and, more importantly, why you are doing it. How many managers, I wonder, get the opportunity to question what they are doing? If you allow yourself to slip into complacency then you and your organization will soon lose competitive advantage.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Praveen Aggarwal, Taihoon Cha and David Wilemon

This paper examines adoption of reallynew products (RNPs) from a consumer perspective. The unique characteristics of RNPs which differentiate them from other innovative…

Abstract

This paper examines adoption of reallynew products (RNPs) from a consumer perspective. The unique characteristics of RNPs which differentiate them from other innovative products are examined in relation to the role which these characteristics play in creating barriers to adoption of RNPs. These characteristics in turn affect different stages of the adoption process. Surrogate buyers, acting as agents used by adopters to provide guidance, direction, and/or advice related to marketplace activities, can significantly impact consumer adoption and commercial success of RNPs by minimizing or overcoming barriers related to the stages of the adoption process and characteristics of RNPs.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Martin Fojt

In the hectic world in which we live it is all too easy to lose sight of our original goals. Day‐to‐day events take on an unprecedented amount of importance relative to…

Abstract

In the hectic world in which we live it is all too easy to lose sight of our original goals. Day‐to‐day events take on an unprecedented amount of importance relative to our overall aims. What people need more of is an overview of what they are doing to enable clarity and perspective to shine through. Easier said than done, I hear you say, and you are probably right. This special issue of British Food Journal, on the theme of new product development, aims to add perspective by adding a selection of articles on how other industries manage this most important of areas.

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British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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