Search results

1 – 10 of 176
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Iman Sedighi, Majid R. Ayatollahi, Bahador Bahrami, Marco A. Pérez-Martínez and Andres A. Garcia-Granada

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of layer orientation on the tensile, flexural and fracture behavior of additively manufactured (AM) polycarbonate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of layer orientation on the tensile, flexural and fracture behavior of additively manufactured (AM) polycarbonate (PC) produced using fused deposition modeling (FDM).

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental approach is undertaken and a total number of 48 tests are conducted. Two types of tensile specimens are used and their mechanical behavior and fracture surfaces are studied. Also, circular parts with different layer orientations are printed and two semi-circular bending (SCB) samples are extracted from each part. Finally, the results of samples with different build directions are compared to one another to better understand the mechanical behavior of additively manufactured PC.

Findings

The results demonstrate anisotropy in the tensile, flexural and fracture behavior of the additively manufactured PC parts with the latter being less anisotropic compared to the first two. It is also demonstrated that the anisotropy of the elastic modulus is small and can be neglected. Tensile strength ranges from 40 MPa to 53 MPa. At the end, mode I fracture toughness prediction curves are provided for different directions of the FDM samples. Fracture toughness ranges from 1.93 to 2.37 MPa.mm1/2.

Originality/value

The SCB specimen, a very suitable geometry for characterizing anisotropic materials, was used to characterize FDM parts for the first time. Also, the fracture properties of the AM PC have not been studied by the researchers in the past. Therefore, fracture toughness prediction curves are presented for this anisotropic material. These curves can be very suitable for designing parts that are going to be produced by 3D printing. Moreover, the effect of the area to perimeter ratio on the tensile properties of the printed parts is investigated.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Jaroslav Mackerle

This paper gives a bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied to the analysis of ceramics and glass materials. The bibliography at the end of the…

Downloads
1878

Abstract

This paper gives a bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied to the analysis of ceramics and glass materials. The bibliography at the end of the paper contains references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations on the subject that were published between 1977‐1998. The following topics are included: ceramics – material and mechanical properties in general, ceramic coatings and joining problems, ceramic composites, ferrites, piezoceramics, ceramic tools and machining, material processing simulations, fracture mechanics and damage, applications of ceramic/composites in engineering; glass – material and mechanical properties in general, glass fiber composites, material processing simulations, fracture mechanics and damage, and applications of glasses in engineering.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Jirí Behal, Petr Homola and Roman Ružek

The prediction of fatigue crack growth behaviour is an important part of damage tolerance analyses. Recently, the author’s work has focused on evaluating the FASTRAN…

Downloads
86

Abstract

Purpose

The prediction of fatigue crack growth behaviour is an important part of damage tolerance analyses. Recently, the author’s work has focused on evaluating the FASTRAN retardation model. This model is implemented in the AFGROW code, which allows different retardation models to be compared. The primary advantage of the model is that all input parameters, including those for an initial plane-strain state and its transition to a plane-stress-state, are objectively measured using standard middle-crack-tension M(T) specimens. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of the FASTRAN model to predict correct retardation effects due to high loading peaks that occur during variable amplitude loading in sequences representative of an aircraft service.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper addresses pre-setting of the fracture toughness K R (based on J-integral J Q according to ASTM1820) in the FASTRAN retardation model. A set of experiments were performed using specimens made from a 7475-T7351 aluminium alloy plate. Loading sequences with peaks ordered in ascending-descending blocks were used. The effect of truncating and clipping selected load levels on crack propagation behaviour was evaluated using both experimental data and numerical analyses. The findings were supported by the results of a fractographic analysis.

Findings

Fatigue crack propagation data defined using M(T) specimens made from Al 7475-T7351 alloy indicate the difficulty of evaluating the following two events simultaneously: fatigue crack increments after application of loads with maximum amplitudes that exceeded J Q and subcritical crack increments caused by loads at high stress intensity factors. An effect of overloading peaks with a maximum that exceeds J Q should be assessed using a special analysis beyond the scope of the FASTRAN retardation model.

Originality/value

Measurements of fatigue crack growth on specimens made from 7475 T7351 aluminium alloy were carried out. The results indicated that simultaneously evaluating fatigue crack increments after application of the load amplitude above J Q and subcritical increments caused by the loads at high stress intensity factors is difficult. Experiments demonstrated that if the fatigue crack reaches a specific length, the maximal amplitude load induces considerable crack growth retardation.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Iman Sedighi, Majid R. Ayatollahi, Bahador Bahrami, Marco A. Pérez-Martínez and Andrés A. Garcia-Granada

The purpose of this paper is to study the Mode I fracture behavior of polycarbonate (PC) parts produced using fused deposition modeling (FDM). The focus of this study is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the Mode I fracture behavior of polycarbonate (PC) parts produced using fused deposition modeling (FDM). The focus of this study is on samples printed along the out-of-plane direction with different raster angles.

Design/methodology/approach

Tensile and Mode I fracture tests were conducted. Semi-circular bend specimens were used for the fracture tests, which were printed in four different raster patterns of (0/90), (15/−75) (30/−60) and (45/−45). Moreover, the finite element method (FEM) was used to determine the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) for the printed PC parts. The fracture toughness results, as well as the fracture path and the fracture surfaces, were studied to describe the fracture behavior of the samples.

Findings

Finite element results confirm that the use of LEFM is allowed for the tested PC samples. The fracture toughness results show that changing the direction of the printed rasters can have an effect of up to 50% on the fracture toughness of the printed parts, with the (+45/−45) and (0/90) orientations having the highest and lowest resistance to crack propagation, respectively. Moreover, except for the (0/90) orientation, the other samples have higher crack resistance compared to the bulk material. The fracture toughness of the tested PC depends more on the toughness of the printed sample, rather than its tensile strength.

Originality/value

The toughness and the energy absorption capability of the printed samples (with different raster patterns) were identified as the main properties affecting the fracture toughness of the AM PC parts. Because the fracture resistance of almost all the samples was higher than that of the base material, it is evident that by choosing the right raster patterns for 3D-printed parts, very high resistance to crack growth may be obtained. Also, using FEM and comparing the size of the plastic zones, it was concluded that, although the tensile curves show nonlinearity, LEFM is still applicable for the printed parts.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Imad Barsoum, Hamda Almansoori, Aaesha Ahmed Almazrouei and Ebru Gunister

The main aim of this study is to determine the fracture toughness and accordingly to predict the fracture initiation, crack propagation and mode of crack extension…

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to determine the fracture toughness and accordingly to predict the fracture initiation, crack propagation and mode of crack extension accurately in polypropylene subsea pipes subjected to internal pressure.

Design/methodology/approach

Tensile test was performed following the ISO 527–1 standard. An elastic-plastic constitutive model was developed based on the tensile test results, and it is implemented in the FEA model to describe the constitutive behaviour of the polypropylene material. Three-point bend tests with linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach were conducted following ISO-13586 standard, from which the average fracture toughness of the polypropylene pipe material in crack-opening mode was found as KIc = 3.3 MPa√m. A numerical model of the experiments is developed based on the extended finite element method (XFEM), which showed markedly good agreement with the experimental results.

Findings

The validated XFEM modelling approach is utilised to illustrate its capabilities in predicting fracture initiation and crack propagation in a polypropylene subsea pipe subjected to an internal pressure containing a semi-elliptical surface crack, which agrees well with existing analytical solutions. The XFEM model is capable of predicting the crack initiation and propagation in the polypropylene pipe up to the event of leakage.

Originality/value

The methodology proposed herein can be utilised to assess the structural integrity and resistance to fracture of subsea plastic pipes subjected to operational loads (e.g. internal pressure).

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Christos Vasilios Katsiropoulos, Evangelos D. Drainas and Spiros G. Pantelakis

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of adhesively bonded joints using an alternative artificial neural networks (ANN) approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of adhesively bonded joints using an alternative artificial neural networks (ANN) approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the necessary surface pre-treatment and bonding process, the coupons were investigated for possible defects using C-scan ultrasonic inspection. Afterwards, the damage severity factor (DSF) theory was applied in order to quantify the existing damage state. A series of G IC mechanical tests was then conducted so as to assess the fracture toughness behavior of the bonded samples. Finally, the data derived both from the NDT tests (DSF) and the mechanical tests (fracture toughness energy) were combined and used to train the ANN which was developed within the present work.

Findings

Using the developed neural network (NN) the bonding quality, in terms not only of defects but also of fracture toughness behavior, can be accessed through NDT testing, minimizing the need for mechanical tests only in the initial material characterization phase.

Originality/value

The innovation of the paper stands on the feasibility of an alternative approach for assessing the quality of adhesively bonded joints using and ANNs, thus minimizing the necessary testing effort.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Virginia Madrazo, Sergio Cicero and Isidro Carrascal

The purpose of this paper is to present and validate a methodology for the structural integrity assessment of components containing a variety of stress risers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and validate a methodology for the structural integrity assessment of components containing a variety of stress risers and subjected to static conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on the use of the apparent fracture toughness prediction provided by the theory of critical distances (in this case, the line method), together with a well‐known, widely‐used engineering tool in structural integrity assessments: failure assessment diagrams. In order to validate the proposed methodology, an experimental programme has been conducted, testing 38 specimens made of aluminium alloy Al7075‐T651, each of them containing a certain stress riser. The comparison between the experimental results and the corresponding predictions provided by the proposed assessment methodology has also allowed the situations for which the theory of critical distances provides accurate predictions to be defined.

Findings

The results show that the methodology provides accurate results as long as the Neuber number, defined as the notch radius divided by the critical distance (L), is sufficiently low. In order to extend the validity to situations where the Neuber number is higher, it is necessary to calibrate L by using notched specimens with similar radii to those found in the defects being analysed.

Originality/value

The present study is part of Virginia Madrazo's doctoral thesis, an original research work.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Amir Hossein Kohsary, Mohammad Fatehi Marji and Hasan Hosseini Nasab

This paper describes progress on the development of theoretical models required for studying failure mechanism, crack initiation and growth around the boreholes driven by…

Abstract

This paper describes progress on the development of theoretical models required for studying failure mechanism, crack initiation and growth around the boreholes driven by hydrofracturing processes in Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoirs of geothermal energy. Due to the importance of the stress intensity factor concept (K) in Fracture Mechanics, some advanced modeling techniques for accurate and fast determination of K for relevant problems are proposed. Alternative tools to deal with stress intensity factor determination are developed and assessed from the points of view of accuracy and computational cost. We concentrate on residual strength, crack initiation and crack growth as a means to model and understand experimentally observed behaviors. Several modeling methods such as compounding and weight function techniques, and boundary and finite element modeling for stress intensity factor calculation are discussed. Further to reviews of those techniques, work performed included (i) developing alternative solutions to deal with boundary‐to‐boundary interaction when using the compounding technique, (ii) relating the precision of K calculations with the level of precision of the crack opening displacement of a reference solution, in order to assess the precision of weight function technique, (iii) modeling relevant geometries using the finite element method (FEM), (iv) working on the implementation of direct stress intensity factor K determination in the Higher Order Displacement Discontinuity Method (HODDM), and (v) developing tools to deal with residual stress fields around the boundary of the hydraulically pressurized boreholes.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Bin Chen, Song Cen, Andrew R. Barron, D.R.J. Owen and Chenfeng Li

The purpose of this paper is to systematically investigate the fluid lag phenomena and its influence in the hydraulic fracturing process, including all stages of fluid-lag…

Downloads
1087

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically investigate the fluid lag phenomena and its influence in the hydraulic fracturing process, including all stages of fluid-lag evolution, the transition between different stages and their coupling with dynamic fracture propagation under common conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A plane 2D model is developed to simulate the complex evolution of fluid lag during the propagation of a hydraulic fracture driven by an impressible Newtonian fluid. Based on the finite element method, a fully implicit solution scheme is proposed to solve the strongly coupled rock deformation, fluid flow and fracture propagation. Using the proposed model, comprehensive parametric studies are performed to examine the evolution of fluid lag in various geological and operational conditions.

Findings

The numerical simulations predict that the lag ratio is around 5% or even lower at the beginning stage of hydraulic fracture under practical geological conditions. With the fracture propagation, the lag ratio keeps decreasing and can be ignored in the late stage of hydraulic fracturing for typical parameter combinations. On the numerical aspect, whether the fluid lag can be ignored depends not only on the lag ratio but also on the minimum mesh size used for fluid flow. In addition, an overall mixed-mode fracture propagation factor is proposed to describe the relationship between diverse parameters and fracture curvature.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, relatively simple physical models such as linear elasticity for solid, Newtonian model for fluid and linear elasticity fracture mechanics for fracture are used. The current model does not account for such effects like leak off, poroelasticity and softening of rock formations, which may also visibly affect the fluid lag depending on specific reservoir conditions.

Originality/value

This study helps to understand the effect of fluid lag during hydraulic fracturing processes and provides numerical experience in dealing with the fluid lag with finite element simulation.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Muhamad Husnain Mohd Noh, Mohd Akramin Mohd Romlay, Chuan Zun Liang, Mohd Shamil Shaari and Akiyuki Takahashi

Failure of the materials occurs once the stress intensity factor (SIF) overtakes the material fracture toughness. At this level, the crack will grow rapidly resulting in…

Abstract

Purpose

Failure of the materials occurs once the stress intensity factor (SIF) overtakes the material fracture toughness. At this level, the crack will grow rapidly resulting in unstable crack growth until a complete fracture happens. The SIF calculation of the materials can be conducted by experimental, theoretical and numerical techniques. Prediction of SIF is crucial to ensure safety life from the material failure. The aim of the simulation study is to evaluate the accuracy of SIF prediction using finite element analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The bootstrap resampling method is employed in S-version finite element model (S-FEM) to generate the random variables in this simulation analysis. The SIF analysis studies are promoted by bootstrap S-version Finite Element Model (BootstrapS-FEM). Virtual crack closure-integral method (VCCM) is an important concept to compute the energy release rate and SIF. The semielliptical crack shape is applied with different crack shape aspect ratio in this simulation analysis. The BootstrapS-FEM produces the prediction of SIFs for tension model.

Findings

The mean of BootstrapS-FEM is calculated from 100 samples by the resampling method. The bounds are computed based on the lower and upper bounds of the hundred samples of BootstrapS-FEM. The prediction of SIFs is validated with Newman–Raju solution and deterministic S-FEM within 95 percent confidence bounds. All possible values of SIF estimation by BootstrapS-FEM are plotted in a graph. The mean of the BootstrapS-FEM is referred to as point estimation. The Newman–Raju solution and deterministic S-FEM values are within the 95 percent confidence bounds. Thus, the BootstrapS-FEM is considered valid for the prediction with less than 6 percent of percentage error.

Originality/value

The bootstrap resampling method is employed in S-FEM to generate the random variables in this simulation analysis.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

1 – 10 of 176