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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Robert Weinhandl, Zsolt Lavicza and Tony Houghton

Flipped classroom approaches (FCA) are an educational innovation that could increase students' learning outcomes in, and their enjoyment of, mathematics or STEM education…

Abstract

Purpose

Flipped classroom approaches (FCA) are an educational innovation that could increase students' learning outcomes in, and their enjoyment of, mathematics or STEM education. To integrate FCA into education sustainably, professional teacher development (PTD) is a promising tool. The research aim is to explore which aspects should be considered when developing and implementing professional mathematics or STEM teacher development for flipped approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 expert interviews were conducted and analysed according to a synthesis of grounded theory approaches and qualitative interview study principles.

Findings

Evaluating the interview data indicates that the characteristics of different teacher types in PTD, learning activities in PTD and the DSE model derived in this study could be vital elements in professional mathematics or STEM teacher development for flipped approaches.

Originality/value

Evaluating the interview data indicates that the characteristics of different teacher types in PTD, learning activities in PTD and the DSE model derived in this study could be vital elements in professional mathematics or STEM teacher development for flipped approaches.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Achim Andreas Haid and Ali Öztüren

This study aims to understand the house owners' energy concerns. An exploratory inductive research design has been chosen to explore the perceptions of households towards…

Abstract

This study aims to understand the house owners' energy concerns. An exploratory inductive research design has been chosen to explore the perceptions of households towards the modernization of energy use in residential buildings. Face-to-face interviews with experts and households were conducted in Baden-Württemberg, Germany to collect the data. This study found that most of the house owners do not know about the benefits of increasing the energy performance in residential buildings and which energy efficiency potentials they can acquire. Additionally, house owners’ superficial knowledge creates fears and doubts concerning the modernization of energy use in residential buildings. Moreover, this study found that the local public administration, such as the municipalities, has a good reputation among households. Hence, public marketing activities should be run locally. It is suggested that the public administration should not conduct any public marketing activities without the support, for example, of the mayor. Further, it is necessary to supply the house owners with clear and understandable information on the topic and to demonstrate the functionality of the technologies to increase energy efficiency in residential buildings. Moreover, interpersonal communication such as a hotline and personal advisory service concerning energy-efficient refurbishment of residential buildings can be very beneficial to support the households. Local public administration should aim to introduce public marketing activities to enhance the modernization of energy use in residential buildings.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2018

Nicole Baron and Zegeye Cherenet

Resilience has recently attracted widespread interest in the field of urban planning and theory. However, the research that has been conducted on urban resilience in…

Abstract

Purpose

Resilience has recently attracted widespread interest in the field of urban planning and theory. However, the research that has been conducted on urban resilience in Africa has major theoretical and methodological gaps. This can lead to problems when designing and implementing resilience strategies there. Understanding African perspectives can be a way of tackling these. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the example of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, this paper analyses expert interviews based on a grounded theory approach. The goal is to explore locally specific perceptions of and pathways to urban resilience. By comparing these findings to those reported in the existing literature, differences and overlaps are identified.

Findings

This study provides evidence for the existence of locally specific perceptions of and pathways to urban resilience. Furthermore, it identifies urban development pathways such as complete urban makeover (tabula rasa) and complete negation of change (resistance).

Research limitations/implications

Because this study uses Addis Ababa as a singular case and expert interviews as method, it rather represents an initial attempt at exploring a new research field than claiming generalisability. Its quality and significance lie in its discursive approach and theory formation.

Practical implications

This exemplary study from Ethiopia demonstrates that a regionally specific understanding of urban resilience is valuable for the design and implementation of urban resilience strategies.

Originality/value

This study offers unique insights into urban resilience from an African perspective and into the manifestation of urban resilience in Addis Ababa.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Eamonn McQuade, Ellen Sjoer, Peter Fabian, José Carlos Nascimento and Sanaz Schroeder

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project, the aim of which was to identify the potential loss of company knowledge and expertise as experienced and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project, the aim of which was to identify the potential loss of company knowledge and expertise as experienced and expert employees retire.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this research was based on interviewing experienced and expert people who had retired or were approaching retirement: An application of expert interviewing. The interviews were conducted in five countries, across a number of sectors and involving a range of company sizes. The work of the research team was guided by an advisory panel of people with significant, senior level industrial experience.

Findings

In addition to the potential loss of technical product and process knowledge and expertise, there is a loss of expertise in interpersonal communication skill both in the company and in communication with companies and people who are suppliers and customers, in knowing the company culture and the way things are done and in the loss of maturity and stabilising influence.

Research limitations/implications

The number of people interviewed was relatively small. However, the research pointed out the need for companies, both large and small, to put in place succession planning, talent management and knowledge management processes as well as training in transferable skills or soft skills.

Practical implications

Management training programmes and courses need to include aspects of succession planning, talent management and knowledge management processes as well as training in transferable skills or soft skills.

Originality/value

The research team and the advisory panel involved participants from five EU countries large and small, east and west, north and south, developed and developing, EU founder members and newer accession states. It involved working in five languages and cultures. Despite this diversity there was great agreement on the findings and implications.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Thomas Wagenknecht, René Filpe and Christof Weinhardt

Employees demand high responsibility and empowerment, while keeping their work communal and flexible. Initiatives that foster organizational participation (OP) can…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees demand high responsibility and empowerment, while keeping their work communal and flexible. Initiatives that foster organizational participation (OP) can contribute to the fulfillment of such work conditions. Research in sociology and psychology demonstrated positive effects on job satisfaction as well as on productivity. However, adoption of social software is widely spread in firms, research on the determinants of computer-supported OP is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to describe the elements to consider when designing OP processes that aim to be beneficial for both the employer as well as the employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted 20 guided expert interviews to propose a nascent design theory, following a socio-technical approach that promotes democratic and humanistic principles.

Findings

Building on the expert interview, the process model includes a topic horizon and a collaboration phase, which creates proposals that have to be decided in order to produce results. The authors show how employee competence and leadership commitment are as important as the workload and support as well as an option for anonymous communication. The authors propose a set of features and explain principles of implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the authors’ best efforts to diversify the authors’ set of experts, the findings have a limited generalizability as the authors only interviewed a few selected German experts that were either members of the board, HR or IT managers, often concerned with organizing rather than only participating in computer-supported organizational participation (CSOP) processes. Besides testing the model in practise, future research should also consider surveying a broader (and more international) set of employers and employees.

Practical implications

The authors propose a step-by-step procedure to introduce CSOP. Despite identifying many pitfalls, the research demonstrates that CSOP promises a wide variety of benefits to both employers as well as the employees of an organization, including increased satisfaction as well as productivity.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to propose a nascent design theory for CSOP. The authors derive a number of requirements to consider when implementing an information management system that seeks to improve both the efficiency and equality of employers and employees and lead to a win-win situation for both. The authors describe valid constructs for firms with spatially and timely dispersed teams and more than 50 employees. The research is based on 20 expert interviews, conducted with senior managers of medium and large German enterprises.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Peter Granig and Kathrin Hilgarter

Organisations need to tackle emerging trends that affect business models (BM) by modifying, changing or re‐designing their models. Attending this complex environment by…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations need to tackle emerging trends that affect business models (BM) by modifying, changing or re‐designing their models. Attending this complex environment by understanding trends and the strategies actors use to handle these competing demands is strategically important for innovation management and sustaining organisations.. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how organisations assess and deal with these complex and relevant challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 18 higher management experts between the ages of 27 and 59 years participated in this four-month qualitative interview-based study. The interviews were analysed by using systematic, qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Results showed that all elements of a BM are influenced by emerged trends, and how organisations deal with them can decide whether the impact poses as risk or offers opportunities. Trends trigger two different strategies – reactive and proactive resilience strategies – which are closely related to the change sensitivity of the attributional resilience model, thereby presenting a crucial factor for enhancing resilience. Nevertheless, the proactive resilience strategy seems to be more promising for enhancing organisational resilience regarding the influence of trends on their BM. Moreover, this study found that the usage of foresight methods might be suitable as an important tool for proactive resilience strategy to modification, change or re-design of BM and consequently anticipate trends.

Originality/value

Overall, this study is one of the first that explains how BMs are influenced by trends and how organisations handle them by using organisational resilience strategies.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Debasisha Mishra and Biswajit Mahanty

The purpose of the paper is to find out the knowledge requirements and its effect on both onsite and offshore project work division for development, re-engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to find out the knowledge requirements and its effect on both onsite and offshore project work division for development, re-engineering and maintenance projects in Indian outsourcing software industry in different phases of software development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an expert interview approach in Indian software industry to find out knowledge requirement for project execution and division of work between onsite and offshore locations. The requisite data were collected through expert interviews and direct observations.

Findings

The study found that the development projects require higher level of domain, strategic, business process and operation process knowledge in comparison to re-engineering and maintenance projects. So there is a need of higher onsite presence in development projects. The maintenance work is taken up at the offshore location in a phase-wise manner.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of the study is in the development of a broad framework of knowledge requirements and work division in on-shore and offshore locations for Indian software outsourcing projects. As the study is based on expert opinion in the context of India, it cannot be generalized for outsourcing scenarios elsewhere.

Practical implications

The software project manager can use the findings to get more insight into the project and divide the software team between onsite and offshore location.

Originality/value

The study is novel, as there is little attempt at finding the knowledge requirement to execute various kinds of business software development in outsourcing environment in the context of India.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Katja Karhu

Sharing expertise is a growing field of interest because of the increased amount of available information, turnover of experts and globalization of companies. Sharing…

Abstract

Sharing expertise is a growing field of interest because of the increased amount of available information, turnover of experts and globalization of companies. Sharing expertise is a difficult task; therefore, experts often lack motivation, skills and time to document their expertise. The developed expertise cycle is a framework where knowledge stewards build personal trusted relationships with experts. Knowledge stewards interview the experts, construct the knowledge and document it, making it available for knowledge seekers. The expertise cycle is tested in two cases where the expertise is distributed to different individuals and business units. In both cases the usage of the expertise cycle was expanded. As a conclusion, the usage of the expertise cycle and described best practices are recommended. Instead of providing more information we should concentrate on providing better quality of information – and the expertise cycle is a valuable method to achieve this goal.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Diane Orlich Kuhlmann and Alexandre Ardichvili

This paper aims to examine the development of expertise in an applied discipline by addressing the research question: How is professional expertise developed in an applied…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the development of expertise in an applied discipline by addressing the research question: How is professional expertise developed in an applied profession?

Design/methodology/approach

Using a grounded theory methodology (GTM), nine technical-tax experts, and three experienced, non-expert tax professionals were interviewed regarding their experience in developing technical-tax expertise. Using GTM procedures, a core concept and variables (categories and properties of categories) were identified. A theory is advanced which explains the interaction of the core concept and the variables.

Findings

This theory proposes that expertise in applied disciplines occurs through years of engaging in the high-value, non-routine work. Professionals with an intelligence matched to the discipline and willingness to work hard are more likely to be successful in this non-routine work. Professionals who find the discipline fascinating and who revel in ambiguity are likely to repeatedly seek this non-routine work. Finally, professionals in organizations with complex client issues are more likely to have opportunities to engage in non-routine work.

Research limitations/implications

This study proposed a theory related to a very specific profession – tax accounting. Future research would be appropriate to determine whether other applied disciplines have a similar dynamic in developing expertise.

Originality/value

Based on existing theories of expertise, this study developed a new theory of how professional expertise is developed in an applied discipline.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Javier Esquer‐Peralta, Luis Velazquez and Nora Munguia

The concepts of sustainable development (SD) and management systems (MS) are finding increasing acceptance in a variety of fields, including academy, politics, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The concepts of sustainable development (SD) and management systems (MS) are finding increasing acceptance in a variety of fields, including academy, politics, and non‐governmental organizations. These concepts are also being used by the general population. This paper aims to describe the perception of different experts by discussing the usefulness of sustainability management systems (SMS) as holistic systems that might integrate environmental, social, and economic elements.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was framed by the general systems theory and its nature is totally qualitative and exploratory in order to understand the significant attributes that affect or benefit a management system to reach sustainability. A total of 14 interviews were conducted with several experts around the world. Some are professional persons in sustainability issues in general, and some in environmental, health and safety (EHS) issues in particular.

Findings

The results shows that, although there is a continuous debate on the sustainability approach, several core elements can be addressed for sustainability management systems (SMS). For instance, 71.4 percent of the interviewees agreed that management systems are useful for sustainable development, or at least potentially useful, and 42.9 percent of the experts declared that having a clear understanding of the long‐term economic benefits for the company is an important incentive for their implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were conducted with a limited number of experts and there was no field verification of claims. Therefore, conclusions derived from these sources depend on the veracity of the information provided by participants. Expert bias may also have an impact on the outcomes of this research.

Practical implications

The findings provide management systems' practitioners with key elements when sustainability management systems are being created, maintained and evaluated.

Originality/value

The findings are not results from general concepts, but rather elicited from empirical data from fourteen sustainability, and health and safety experts around the world.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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