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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Hubert K Rampersad

Examines the conceptual design of robotic assembly systems inconjunction with the analysis and optimization of the product and processdesign. Explains how an integral…

Abstract

Examines the conceptual design of robotic assembly systems in conjunction with the analysis and optimization of the product and process design. Explains how an integral assembly model is utilised to study the relationships between assembly variables which play a role in each stage of the design process. Outlines the characteristics and benefits of the concentric design process and explains the total productivity concept. Concludes that the integral assembly model, which underlies the concentric design process, provides the opportunity to store product, process and system data and can therefore be considered as a reference model for product development and process planning as well as for the design and analysis of assembly systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Yuan Fu Qiu, Yoon Ping Chui and Martin G. Helander

The purpose of this research is to aim to improve the cognitive understanding of knowledge processing and provide a cognitive knowledge modeling method in product design.

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2292

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to aim to improve the cognitive understanding of knowledge processing and provide a cognitive knowledge modeling method in product design.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a cognitive model of knowledge processing is described. A cognitive knowledge modeling method is presented. Suggestions on cognitive support for knowledge based systems are provided.

Findings

There is often a fundamental mismatch between the way human process knowledge and the way it is processed by technology for supporting product design. It is necessary to develop tools, methods and technology which integrate seamlessly with the design process. This study focuses on the internal human activities and explores knowledge management research from a human factors perspective. Cognitive knowledge modeling will result in a natural integration of knowledge‐based systems into the design process.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses an experimental approach and hopefully the research can therefore be generalized to other situations.

Practical implications

This study provides guidelines for cognitive support for knowledge‐based systems.

Originality/value

Cognitive knowledge processing is described and a cognitive knowledge modeling method is presented. The paper explores knowledge management research by analyzing human activities, in combination with the study of management and engineering technologies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Richard Dealtry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successful design and management of high performance work‐based lifelong learning processes.

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2399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successful design and management of high performance work‐based lifelong learning processes.

Design

The paper summarises the process management practices and contextual parameters that are being applied in the successful design and management of high performance work based lifelong learning processes.

Findings

The paper finds that innovations in lifelong learning process design and development are restricted by traditional pedagogical thinking and administrative practices, an over emphasis on e‐learning and insufficient consideration of the holistic contextual factors. Design solutions are dynamically based on the idea of a timeless organic order or meta‐planning.

Research limitations

This paper is an outline summary of extensive lifelong learning process design best practice work with client organisations. As with many innovations taking place at the leading edge of work‐based learning management there is a limited supply of reliable published information.

Originality/value

Satisfying the important questions relating to the achievement of more substantial learning relevance in programme curriculum, the coherence of processes for validating non‐formal and informal learning and the effective value of e‐learning systems, are currently key areas of debate and policy making in Europe in particular. Where public and private sector companies are finding local global solutions these results are of considerable value in informing quality design and the way forward.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Johan Lilja and Daniel Richardsson

Appreciative inquiry (AI) is an inquiry into the “best of” what already exists in a system. Applying AI at the start of a design process gives a process that is very…

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522

Abstract

Purpose

Appreciative inquiry (AI) is an inquiry into the “best of” what already exists in a system. Applying AI at the start of a design process gives a process that is very different from traditional design approaches, in other words “appreciative design” is achieved. The overall purpose of this paper is to explore and contribute to a process of putting appreciative design into practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers have, in their role as educational leaders, developed and applied a process for appreciative design within the context of the entrepreneurial educational program “Skarp Åre, Business and product development” at Mid Sweden University.

Findings

The process introduced is referred to as Appreciative Course Evaluation and Design (ACED). The benefits of ACED, found in comparison to conventional practice, include higher commitment by the course participants, lower risk in the design process, and increased student involvement in the evaluation and design process.

Originality/value

The paper contributes in general to increasing the understanding of how the strengths and principles of appreciative inquiry can be incorporated into design processes. It is hoped that the insights presented will inspire future research and application of appreciative design, not only to the evaluation and design of higher education, but also to the evaluation and design of products, services, organizations and society.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

AYCA TUZMEN

This paper presents a research study conducted for evaluating the effectiveness of a conceptual model of a distributed process management environment in the establishment…

Abstract

This paper presents a research study conducted for evaluating the effectiveness of a conceptual model of a distributed process management environment in the establishment of a collaborative building design. At the highest level, the conceptual model of the distributed process management environment have the following features: (a) enables description of a plan of a design process, (b) enables enactment of a process according to its plan, and (c) enables control and management of the enactment of a design process. The paper also presents the findings of a verification and validation (V & V) study conducted for evaluating the fit between the needs and expectations of collaborating design groups and the solution provided by the conceptual model of the distributed process management environment.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Niels Lohse, Svetan Ratchev and George Valtchanov

The development of reconfigurable modular production systems is one of the crucial factors for manufacturers to sustain their competitive advantage in areas such as…

Abstract

The development of reconfigurable modular production systems is one of the crucial factors for manufacturers to sustain their competitive advantage in areas such as precision assembly. To ensure the effective and cost efficient configuration and successive reconfigurations it is of critical importance to involve all stakeholders in the decision‐making process. The reported research is targeting the development of an integrated Web‐enabled decision‐making environment that supports some of the key assembly system engineering stages from user requirement specification to system implementation. The focus is on the design of assembly workstations based on detailed process requirements with a target of developing highly efficient and cost‐effective solutions. The paper presents an application framework for collaborative distributed design supported by domain ontologies and is illustrated using an industrial case study.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

P. Raghuram and Mahesh Kumar Arjunan

This purpose of this study is to develop a simple framework for designing a warehouse incorporating lean principles. Multiple objectives like resource planning, material…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this study is to develop a simple framework for designing a warehouse incorporating lean principles. Multiple objectives like resource planning, material handling, storage, inventory management, including internal and external logistics, are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A design procedure to incorporate lean principles for designing a warehouse for a complex multi-model production line has been proposed. The preferred standards and factors affecting warehouse design, the inputs and outputs of process flow characteristics, are incorporated into the design. Current and future state value stream mappings are drawn to bring out the challenges in the value flow.

Findings

The framework for designing a lean warehouse have been implemented and validated in a heavy machinery manufacturer. This framework will ease the work of the future lean-based warehouse designers to apply simple step-by-step processes to achieve the goal with the nearest accuracy. The steps followed can be summarized as defining the lean processes, making the lean process as the design base, collecting inputs like stock-keeping unit master, inventory and space details, and building the lean warehouse design with the step-by-step processes.

Practical implications

Practical tips on warehouse design have been explained focusing on the part volume, quantity handled, inventory and throughput. This will assist the practitioners in designing a lean warehouse and leading to an improved operational performance.

Originality/value

A simplified design procedure for designing a lean warehouse, along with a real-time case study has been enumerated in detail. Effective use of space and resources with lean tools and techniques lead to better storage and picking efficiency resulting in an overall reduction in cost.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Emanuela Conti and Andrea Chiarini

This paper aims to investigate the phases of new product development within the design-driven innovation (DDI) process, the role of designers and collaborators in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the phases of new product development within the design-driven innovation (DDI) process, the role of designers and collaborators in the process and how this process relates to some quality principles.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative approach using Gioia methodology. In particular, four Italian manufacturing companies in the home appliances and furniture industry were selected, and data mainly collected through direct interviews were analysed through content analysis.

Findings

The new product development related to DDI includes the following phases: the company brief, the designer research, the concept of the designer, the design, legal protection, prototyping, production and the market launch. Designers play a strategic role in the above phases of DDI, but other actors also cooperate and some quality principles affect positively on the process. This study proposes a model for a DDI process in the home appliances and furniture sector.

Research limitations/implications

Although this exploratory study was conducted on only four companies, it advances the DDI research in relation to new product development.

Practical implications

This study makes recommendations to entrepreneurs and managers on how to innovate successfully and to effectively manage designers and collaborators to ensure competition.

Social implications

This analysis highlights that design-based innovation contributes to improving the quality of life of consumers.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to examine the phases of new product development in DDI process, the actors involved and relationship to quality principles for the Italian home appliances and furniture sector.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Marc Wouters, Susana Morales, Sven Grollmuss and Michael Scheer

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product development, and it provides a comparison to an earlier review of the management accounting (MA) literature (Wouters & Morales, 2014).

Methodology/approach

This structured literature search covers papers published in 23 journals in IOM in the period 1990–2014.

Findings

The search yielded a sample of 208 unique papers with 275 results (one paper could refer to multiple cost management methods). The top 3 methods are modular design, component commonality, and product platforms, with 115 results (42%) together. In the MA literature, these three methods accounted for 29%, but target costing was the most researched cost management method by far (26%). Simulation is the most frequently used research method in the IOM literature, whereas this was averagely used in the MA literature; qualitative studies were the most frequently used research method in the MA literature, whereas this was averagely used in the IOM literature. We found a lot of papers presenting practical approaches or decision models as a further development of a particular cost management method, which is a clear difference from the MA literature.

Research limitations/implications

This review focused on the same cost management methods, and future research could also consider other cost management methods which are likely to be more important in the IOM literature compared to the MA literature. Future research could also investigate innovative cost management practices in more detail through longitudinal case studies.

Originality/value

This review of research on methods for cost management published outside the MA literature provides an overview for MA researchers. It highlights key differences between both literatures in their research of the same cost management methods.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Stan Aungst, Russell R. Barton and David T. Wilson

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) proposes to take into account the “voice of the customer,” through a list of customer needs, which are (qualitatively) mapped to…

Abstract

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) proposes to take into account the “voice of the customer,” through a list of customer needs, which are (qualitatively) mapped to technical requirements in House One. But customers do not perceive products in this space, nor do they not make purchase decisions in this space. Marketing specialists use statistical models to map between a simpler space of customer perceptions and the long and detailed list of needs. For automobiles, for example, the main axes in perceptual space might be categories such as luxury, performance, sport, and utility. A product’s position on these few axes determines the detailed customer requirements consistent with the automobiles’ position such as interior volume, gauges and accessories, seating type, fuel economy, door height, horsepower, interior noise level, seating capacity, paint colors, trim, and so forth. Statistical models such as factor analysis and principal components analysis are used to describe the mapping between these spaces, which we call House Zero.

This paper focus on House One. Two important steps of the product development process using House One are: (1) setting technical targets; (2) identifying the inherent tradeoffs in a design including a position of merit. Utility functions are used to determine feature preferences for a product. Conjoint analysis is used to capture the product preference and potential market share. Linear interpolation and the slope point formula are used to determine other points of customer needs. This research draws from the formal mapping concepts developed by Nam Suh and the qualitative maps of quality function deployment, to present unified information and mapping paradigm for concurrent product/process design. This approach is the virtual integrated design method that is tested upon data from a business design problem.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

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