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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Simon Albrecht, Emil Breidahl and Andrew Marty

The majority of job demands-resources (JD-R) research has focused on identifying the job demands, job resources, and personal resources that influence engagement. The…

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4252

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of job demands-resources (JD-R) research has focused on identifying the job demands, job resources, and personal resources that influence engagement. The purpose of this paper is to assess the significance of proposed associations between organizationally focused resources, organizational engagement climate, and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a model proposing that six specific organizational resources would have positive associations with organizational engagement climate, and positive direct and indirect associations with job resources and employee engagement. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted on cross-sectional survey data provided by 1,578 employees working in a range of different organizations.

Findings

The CFA and SEM analyses yielded good fit to the data. As proposed, all six organizational resources were positively associated with organizational engagement climate. Four were positively associated with job resources, and two were positively associated with engagement. Organizational engagement climate was positively associated with job resources and employee engagement. Significant indirect relationships were also observed.

Research limitations/implications

Despite self-reported data and a cross-sectional design, tests of common method variance did not suggest substantive method effects. Overall, the results contribute new insights about what may influence engagement, and highlight the importance of organizational engagement climate as a motivational construct.

Practical implications

The research offers up potentially useful measures of six organizational resources and a measure of organizational engagement climate that can complement and broaden the current focus on job-level diagnostics. As such, targeted management action and survey feedback processes can be used to identify processes to build sustainable organizational engagement capability.

Originality/value

No previous research has identified a comprehensive set of organizational resources, operationalized organizational engagement climate, or examined their relationships within a JD-R context. The results suggest that the JD-R can perhaps usefully be extended to include more organizationally focused constructs.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Ben Jacobsen

Purpose – Responsible investor (RI) engagement seeks to change corporate strategic priorities while balancing the financial imperative. This chapter uses…

Abstract

Purpose – Responsible investor (RI) engagement seeks to change corporate strategic priorities while balancing the financial imperative. This chapter uses an institutional theory framework to explore the tension between financial performance and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues in RI engagement.

Methodology – Discourse of the proponent, supporters and opponents of Australia’s first climate change shareholder resolution – a minority proposal, will be analyzed using framing analysis.

Findings – Framing indicated that the discourse emphasized the dominant financial performance logic while often omitting the ESG logic. One possible explanation is that the process of shareholder proposal nomination and the financial imperative of investment organizations effectively co-opted the engagement.

Research limitations – A case of responsible investment engagement is used to illustrate multiple logics in the investment field. Although there are significant limitations to drawing inferences from a single example, the discussion is relevant to RI support for engagement initiatives such as the UN Principles of Responsible Investment clearinghouse and Carbon Disclosure Project Carbon Action. This chapter argues that attempts to change corporate strategic actions on climate change by RI through engagement will be less effective while the financial performance logic provides relatively more legitimacy to investors.

Practical implications – Integrating the ESG logic with the financial logic is vulnerable to co-optation due to incommensurability. Operationalizing both logics requires establishing a boundary between ESG and financial logics to develop legitimacy.

Social implications – RI engagement on climate change has the potential to be an important part of the social response to the sustainability agenda.

Originality – In applying institutional theory to RI climate change activism this chapter presents original insights into the potential of engagement to effect change.

Details

Institutional Investors’ Power to Change Corporate Behavior: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-771-9

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Ben Jacobsen

Socially responsible investment (SRI) engagement currently performs a variety of supportive regulatory functions such as reframing norms, establishing dialogue and…

Abstract

Purpose

Socially responsible investment (SRI) engagement currently performs a variety of supportive regulatory functions such as reframing norms, establishing dialogue and providing resources to improve performance, however corporate responses are voluntary. This chapter will examine the potential gains in effectiveness for SRI engagement in a responsive regulatory regime.

Approach

Global warming is a pressing environmental, social and governance (ESG) issue. By using the example of climate change the effectiveness of SRI engagement actors and the regulatory context can be considered. This chapter builds the conceptual framework for responsive regulation of climate change.

Findings

SRI engagement may face resistance from corporations due to its voluntary nature and conflict with other goals. Legitimacy and accountability limit the effectiveness of SRI engagement functioning as a voluntary regulatory mechanism. This chapter argues that the effectiveness of SRI engagement on climate change could be enhanced if it served as part of a responsive regulation regime.

Practical implications

Engagement is used by SRIs for ESG issues. A comprehensive regulatory regime could enhance corporate adaptation to climate change through increasing compliance with SRI engagement. The implication for SRI practitioners is that lobbying for a supportive regulatory regime has a large potential benefit.

Social implications

Responsive regulatory policy involves both support and sanctions to improve compliance, enhancing policy efficiency and effectiveness. There are potentially large net social benefits from utilising SRI engagement in a regulatory regime.

Originality of chapter

In seeking to re-articulate voluntary and legal approaches this research addresses a gap in the literature on climate change regulation.

Details

Socially Responsible Investment in the 21st Century: Does it Make a Difference for Society?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-467-1

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

John Wiseman, Lara Williamson and Jess Fritze

This purpose of this paper is to summarise the outcomes of a recent project in Victoria, Australia exploring the effectiveness of community engagement strategies in…

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1476

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to summarise the outcomes of a recent project in Victoria, Australia exploring the effectiveness of community engagement strategies in improving climate mitigation and adaptation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Roundtables and interviews with a diverse range of community engagement practitioners and policy makers involved in climate change work were conducted, informed by a discussion paper outlining recent Australian and international learning about community engagement and climate change.

Findings

The project confirms and builds on recent international learning about the importance of carefully planned and implemented community engagement as essential components in effective climate mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Originality/value

The paper brings together learning from recent on‐the‐ground experience from Australian community engagement practitioners and policy makers working in the climate change field. In addition to evidence supporting the international case for community engagement methodologies the paper also summarises a number of factors important to effective climate change community engagement strategies.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Michelle Chin Chin Lee and Mohd. Awang Idris

The importance of organizational climates in enhancing employees’ job performance is well studied in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect…

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1274

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of organizational climates in enhancing employees’ job performance is well studied in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of psychosocial safety climate (PSC) and team climate on job performance, particularly through job engagement, by using a multilevel survey. The study also predicted that only PSC (and not team climate) predicted job resources (i.e. role clarity and performance feedback).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 412 employees from 44 teams (72.6 per cent response rate) in Malaysian private organizations participated in the current study.

Findings

Research findings revealed that performance feedback and role clarity mediate the relationship between PSC and job engagement, and that there is no direct effect between the variables, team climate, and job resources. As expected, the study also discovered that job engagement mediates the relationship between PSC and team climate related to job performance.

Practical implications

This paper suggests the importance of PSC as the precursor to better working conditions (i.e. job resources) and to indirectly boosting employees’ engagement and job performance.

Originality/value

The study compared two distinctive organizational climate constructs that affect the different types of job resources using multilevel approach within the Asian context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relative importance of personality and organizational climate for two forms of heavy work investment; workaholism, a “bad” and…

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2427

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relative importance of personality and organizational climate for two forms of heavy work investment; workaholism, a “bad” and work engagement, which represents a “good” kind of heavy work investment. More specifically, it is hypothesized that workaholism is positively related to neuroticism (H1) and that work engagement is negatively related to neuroticism and positively to the remaining Big Five personality traits (H2). In addition it is hypothesized that workaholism is positively related to an overwork climate (H3), whereas work engagement is positively related to an employee growth climate (H4).

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted among a sample of the Dutch workforce (n=1,973) and the research model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

It appeared that, in accordance to H1 and H2, particularly neuroticism is related to workaholism, while all personality traits are related to work engagement (predominantly openness to experience and neuroticism). Moreover, and also in accordance with the hypotheses, workaholism is exclusively related to an overwork climate (and not to a growth climate), whereas work engagement is exclusively related to an employee growth climate (and not to an overwork climate).

Originality/value

For the first time the simultaneous impact of personality and organizational climate on two different forms of heavy work investment is investigated. Since no interaction effects have been observed it means that of personality and organizational climate have an independent but also specific impact on both forms of heavy work investment.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Richa Chaudhary and Santosh Rangnekar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative impact of psychological HRD climate and HRD climate quality on work engagement. In addition, the paper attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative impact of psychological HRD climate and HRD climate quality on work engagement. In addition, the paper attempts to examine the boundary conditions of the proposed relationship by proposing and testing HRD climate strength as the moderator of the relationship between psychological HRD climate, HRD climate quality and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a total of 375 business executives from select business organizations in India using standardized measurement instruments. As the present study involved variables at different levels of analysis, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) approach was utilized for the purpose of data analyses.

Findings

The results of HLM revealed that the shared employee perception of development climate accounted for significant percentage of between person variance in work engagement above and beyond individual climate perceptions. HRD climate strength was found to moderate the psychological HRD climate and work engagement relationship but the interaction of HRD climate strength with HRD climate quality did not add further to the understanding of work engagement process.

Practical implications

The findings of the present research imply that creating a climate of human resource development is a compelling intervention, which could provide competitive advantage to the firm in terms of enhanced work engagement levels among employees.

Originality/value

The study established the importance of social system or social interaction climate in its own right by demonstrating its unique effects on individual attitudes over individuals’ idiosyncratic perceptions.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Liat Eldor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employee innovative behavior and proficiency.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employee innovative behavior and proficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Using robust analysis techniques on data from a sample of 419 employees and their supervisors from four different business and public sector organizations, the author tested the proposed relationships, as mediated by job engagement. Moreover, this mediation effect was examined in the light of sector of employment differences (business vs public).

Findings

The results were generally consistent with the hypothesized conceptual scheme, in that the indirect relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employees’ innovative behavior and proficiency was mediated by job engagement. However, with regard to sector employment differences, this mediation process was demonstrated among business sector employees only to the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and innovative behavior. When proficiency was included in the mediation model, this mediation effect was evident among public sector employees.

Originality/value

The research on perceptions of learning climate lacks empirical evidence on its implications for employees’ innovative behavior and proficiency. Although scholars contend that employees’ perceptions of learning climate should enhance their in-role and extra-role performance behaviors, these arguments are mainly non-empirical. Understanding whether perceptions of learning have an impact on employee intra- and extra-role performance behaviors is important, considering that the majority of workplace learning occurs through daily ongoing means that are part of the working environment and previous research results show that structured learning and formal training are less effective in improving employees’ performance at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Carolyn (“Casey”) Findley Musgrove, Alexander E. Ellinger and Andrea D. Ellinger

Research suggests that employee engagement favorably influences the provision of customer service, that high levels of service employee engagement are rare, and that…

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2972

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that employee engagement favorably influences the provision of customer service, that high levels of service employee engagement are rare, and that firms' strategic profit emphases affect engagement and service climate. This study responds to calls for research that identifies drivers of employee engagement and foundational issues that promote effective service climates within service organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method is utilized to assess data from 502 key informant service employees from multiple service industries.

Findings

The findings indicate that service organizations' revenue enhancement and cost containment strategic profit emphases differentially influence employee engagement, and that organizational and job engagement differentially influence service climate.

Research limitations/implications

Data comprised of individual service employees' perceptions of their firms' strategic profit emphases and service climates are utilized. Although it is conceivable that some respondents' perceptions of these variables may be misguided, the study findings are based on a large sample of experienced service employees from multiple service industries.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the most effective approach for promoting effective service climate is to hire service employees with a track record of job engagement and then focus on encouraging organizational engagement by creating working environments that support, value, and reward service quality.

Originality/value

Managers increasingly realize that how firms treat service employees critically affects customer service quality. However, relatively few studies examine service employees' perceptions of their own engagement and their organizations' working environments. This research incorporates social exchange theory and concepts from the fields of strategy and organizational behavior to assess service employees' perceptions of their organizations' strategic profit emphasis and its influence on engagement and service climate.

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Richa Chaudhary, Santosh Rangnekar and Mukesh Kumar Barua

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

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5212

Abstract

Purpose

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of occupational self efficacy and human resource development (HRD) climate on work engagement among business executives of select business organisations in India. In addition, it aims to attempt to examine the mediating effect of HRD climate on self efficacy and work engagement relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 150 business executives from both public and private sector manufacturing and service organisations in India. Data were collected through both personal visits and online questionnaires. Correlation and regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Specifically, Baron and Kenny's method was used for testing the hypotheses of mediation.

Findings

A significant relationship was found between all variables in the study. All the study hypotheses were supported. HRD climate was found to partially mediate the relationship between occupational self‐efficacy and work engagement. Interestingly, both HRD climate and self‐efficacy affect work engagement both directly and indirectly through influencing the other.

Practical implications

Work engagement requires the workforce that is endorsed with self‐efficacy as dispositional trait. In addition, improving the HRD climate can have significant implications for enhancing the work engagement among Indian business executives.

Originality/value

By investigating the relationship between self‐efficacy, HRD climate and work engagement the present study made an effort to fulfil the gap in academic literature where there is a significant dearth of academic literature on work engagement from developing economies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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