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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Michael C.G. Davidson

This paper examines organizational climate and organizational culture within a hotel industry framework. An argument is put forward that there is a causal link between…

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11928

Abstract

This paper examines organizational climate and organizational culture within a hotel industry framework. An argument is put forward that there is a causal link between good organizational climate and the level of service quality in a hotel. Organizational climate is also examined within the service quality framework to explore the effects of its integration into quality initiatives. A conceptual model of organizational climate and service quality and performance is presented that provides an explanation of the linkage between organizational culture, organizational climate, service quality, customer satisfaction and hotel performance.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Amy M. Hageman and Dann G. Fisher

Tax professionals in public accounting firms must meet professional standards in working with their clients, but may also face pressure from both their clients and firms…

Abstract

Tax professionals in public accounting firms must meet professional standards in working with their clients, but may also face pressure from both their clients and firms when making ethical decisions. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of client factors on tax professionals’ ethical decision-making. Furthermore, we also investigate how client service climate and different ethical climate types affect these ethical decisions. Based on an experimental design with 149 practicing tax professionals, results indicate that tax professionals are not swayed by client importance or social interaction with the client when making ethical decisions. However, tax professionals are more likely to engage in ethical behavior when their own accounting firm monitors and tracks the quality of client service, whereas unethical behavior is more common when public accounting firms emphasize using personal ethical beliefs in decision-making. The results of the study suggest the importance of strong policies and procedures to promote ethical decision-making in firms.

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Shaker Bani-Melhem, Mohd Ahmad Al-Hawari and Samina Quratulain

This research primarily aims to study the role of leader-member exchange (LMX) in frontline employees' (FLEs) innovative behaviors, whereby a mediating effect of employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This research primarily aims to study the role of leader-member exchange (LMX) in frontline employees' (FLEs) innovative behaviors, whereby a mediating effect of employee happiness is proposed in this relationship. The moderating effect of service climate is also examined on the indirect effect of LMX on innovative behaviors through happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a sample of 303 FLEs working in various service organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings show that LMX has a positive and significant effect on FLEs' innovative behaviors and that employee happiness is an intervening variable. Service climate moderates the indirect effect of LMX on FLEs' innovative behaviors through happiness, and the effect is stronger in a low (unsupported) service climate.

Practical implications

The findings of this research provide prescriptive insights into the critical role of supervisory behavior in FLEs' innovative service behaviors and how positive emotions contribute to employees' willingness to innovate. Thus, these findings make a unique contribution to research in service management.

Originality/value

Studies examining how and when LMX can affect FLEs' innovative behaviors are limited. These findings offer new insights into the relative importance of supervisor and organizational support (service climate) in FLEs' innovative behaviors. The interaction effect of LMX and service climate has not been previously examined along with positive employee affect (happiness) and innovative behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Tal Katz-Navon, Dana R. Vashdi and Eitan Naveh

The existing research on service climate emphasizes its benefits for customers, employees and organizational outcomes. Service climate translates into organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The existing research on service climate emphasizes its benefits for customers, employees and organizational outcomes. Service climate translates into organizational expectations from service employees to continuously show appropriate emotions when engaging with clients. However, these expectations may also take a toll on employees, who need to regulate their emotions using emotional labor strategies in order to conform to the organization’s expectations. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the service climate and employees’ use of emotional labor strategies, and investigate how service employees’ service knowledge, skills, abilities and other attributes (KSAOs) affect this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In two separate studies, one with a sample including 100 nurses working in 15 wards, and the other comprised of 244 luxury hotel chain employees working in 39 departments, participants were surveyed about their perceptions of the service climate and their use of emotional labor strategies. In addition, each participant’s direct manager assessed his/her service KSAOs.

Findings

Results demonstrated a positive association between the service climate and the use of surface emotional labor strategies for employees who had limited service KSAOs.

Practical implications

Organizations may choose to hire service employees based on their service-related KSAOs and develop training and development programs for those who have fewer capabilities in these areas. In addition, organizations may want to rethink the traditional climate-induced emotional display rules and emphasize instead more authentic service encounters in order to lessen the toll that service climate takes on certain employees.

Originality/value

While service climate depicts the core values and beliefs of the organization about service, and helps employees to translate them into behaviors that promote high service performance, the current paper points to a potential toll it may have on employees well-being due to their use of surface emotional labor strategies.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Mahn Hee Yoon, Sharon E. Beatty and Jaebeom Suh

This paper examines several work climate variables and their impact on service quality. While there exists a variety of work climates relevant to contact employees during…

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6175

Abstract

This paper examines several work climate variables and their impact on service quality. While there exists a variety of work climates relevant to contact employees during service encounters, this study investigates two components for successful implementation of internal marketing, service climate and supportive management. Both climate variables are proposed to affect the attitudes and behaviors of employees, and consequently affect customers’ perceptions of employees’ service performance. This study, which combines perceptions from customers and their contact employees, shows that both climate variables contribute directly to job satisfaction and work effort, and indirectly impact on customers’ perceptions of employee service quality. Also, the empirical results indicate that in addition to job satisfaction, employees’ work effort also plays a strong, central role in determining customers’ perceptions of employee service quality.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Jun Huang, Weiwen Li, Canhua Qiu, Frederick Hong-kit Yim and Junbao Wan

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the theory of servant leadership to examine the influence of chief executive officer (CEO) servant leadership on firm performance…

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4035

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the theory of servant leadership to examine the influence of chief executive officer (CEO) servant leadership on firm performance in the hospitality industry. It examined the mediating role of the service climate and the moderating role of competitive intensity in the relationship between CEO servant leadership and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regression was used to analyze multi-wave, multi-source data from 92 hotels in China. A moderated path analysis was used to test the moderating effects.

Findings

CEO servant leadership positively influenced firm performance via the service climate in the hospitality industry. Competitive intensity strengthened the direct effect of the service climate on firm performance, and the indirect effect of CEO servant leadership on firm performance via service climate.

Research limitations/implications

The findings offer managerial insights into CEO succession, service management and human resource management.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to investigate how and when CEO servant leadership might shape firm outcomes in the hospitality industry. Theoretically, the findings enrich our understanding of how CEO leadership might shape firm-level outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Hee Jung (Annette) Kang, James Busser and Hyung-Min Choi

This study aims to develop a conceptual model of service climate in hospitality, which tests its relationship with psychological capital (PsyCap), quality of work life…

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2003

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a conceptual model of service climate in hospitality, which tests its relationship with psychological capital (PsyCap), quality of work life (QWL) and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected among hotel employees by using an intercept approach and Qualtrics online survey system. Structural equation modeling examined the hypothesized relationships among the constructs in the conceptual model.

Findings

Service climate showed a positive relationship with PsyCap and QWL, and PsyCap partially mediated this relationship. Employees’ level of PsyCap had a powerful impact on QWL. Specifically, employee QWL was a critical mediator (full mediation) between service climate and turnover intention. Finally, PsyCap and QWL showed combined mediating effects between service climate and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the service climate literature in hospitality by offering a new conceptual model representing employees’ perceptions of service climate that influence their willingness to leave the organization with the mediating effects of PsyCap and QWL based on the theory of work adjustment.

Practical implications

The theory of work adjustment provides a deeper understanding of how employees’ perception of service climate affects their turnover intention in hospitality, based on a sample of hotel employees.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the importance of service climate in understanding the turnover intention of hotel employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Ronnie Jia, Blaize Horner Reich and Heather H. Jia

This study aims to extend service climate research from its existing focus on routine service for external clients into a knowledge-intensive, internal (KII) service

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend service climate research from its existing focus on routine service for external clients into a knowledge-intensive, internal (KII) service setting. This extension was important because internal knowledge workers may operate from a monopolistic perspective and not view themselves as service providers because of the technical/professional nature of their work.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys were distributed in participating organizations. One survey, completed by employees in information technology (IT) service units, contains measures of service climate, climate antecedents and technical competence. The second survey, filled out by members of their corporate customer units, taps their evaluations of service quality.

Findings

Service climate in IT service units significantly predicted service evaluations by their respective customer units. Importantly, service climate was more predictive than IT service employees’ technical competency. Role ambiguity, empowerment and work facilitation were also found to be significant service climate antecedents.

Research limitations/implications

These results provided strong empirical evidence supporting an extension of the existing service climate research to KII service settings. To the extent that front-line service employees rely on internal support to deliver quality service to external customers, managers should work to enhance the service climate in internal support units, which ultimately improves external service quality.

Originality/value

This is the first study that establishes the robustness of the service climate construct in KII service settings. It makes service climate a useful managerial tool for improving both internal and external service quality.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

John Walker

This paper aims to report on the findings of a study into staff perceptions of service climate in New Zealand English language centres (ELCs) offering ESOL (English for…

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1269

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the findings of a study into staff perceptions of service climate in New Zealand English language centres (ELCs) offering ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A 71‐item questionnaire based on a Likert scale was used to survey non‐management teaching and administrative staff about their perceptions of the climate quality in their institutions.

Findings

The paper finds that staff in New Zealand ELCs demonstrated a positive perception of the service climate quality in their institutions. Service orientation was viewed as the most positive aspect of ELC service climate. Management aspects were not so positively perceived. The least positively‐perceived aspect of the service climate was resourcing. Significant differences in climate perceptions were identified among staff sub‐groups, and between staff in different ELC types.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of convenience samples are acknowledged. Further research is advocated into management and administrative aspects of ELCs operating in the private sector, as well as into the operation of other educational institutions in a commercial environment.

Practical implications

The paper shows that ELCs are doing well in terms of “soft” service management areas, e.g. service orientation and client focus, but need to pay more attention to the “hard” areas such as resourcing and basic management competencies.

Originality/value

ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) administration and management is a highly under‐researched area. This is one of the few pieces of empirical research in this sector, and thus represents a unique contribution to the literature. The findings will be of interest to anyone working and/or researching in the area of ELC/ESOL management, or in the area of private education provision.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Narges Kia, Beni Halvorsen and Timothy Bartram

Against the backdrop of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Finance Services Industry in Australia, this study on ethical leadership is…

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2203

Abstract

Purpose

Against the backdrop of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Finance Services Industry in Australia, this study on ethical leadership is timely. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effects of organisational identification, customer orientated behaviour, service climate and ethical climate on the relationship between ethical leadership and employee in-role performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using a two-wave survey study of 233 bank employees in Australia.

Findings

Evidence from the study indicated that organisational identification, service climate and ethical climate mediate the relationship between ethical leadership and employee in-role performance. Surprisingly, the proposed mediation effect of customer orientation was not supported. However, ethical leadership was positively associated with customer orientated behaviour among employees.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include collecting data at two time points, thereby rendering the study cross-sectional. Employee in-role performance was a self-rated measure.

Practical implications

This study showed that ethical leadership is critical to improving employee perceptions and experience of an organisation’s service climate, ethical climate, organisational identification, customer orientated behaviour and employee in-role performance. The authors raise a number of HRM implications for the development and enablement of ethical leaders in the banking context.

Originality/value

The findings presented in this paper highlight that ethical leadership is critical to improving employee perceptions and experience of an organisation’s service climate, ethical climate, organisational identification, customer orientated behaviour and employee in-role performance.

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