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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

James M. Bloodgood, Jeffrey S. Hornsby and James C. Hayton

This chapter focuses on how corporate entrepreneurs seize opportunities and deal with threats through resource acquisition, control, and use. When corporate entrepreneurs…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on how corporate entrepreneurs seize opportunities and deal with threats through resource acquisition, control, and use. When corporate entrepreneurs fail to gain control of preferred resources they must rely on their ability to optimize their use of resources on hand in order to avoid the typical limitations inherent in a constrained set of resources. However, control of resources, whether existing or supplementary, by itself is an insufficient basis for influencing performance. Performance also depends on an organization’s capacity to deploy resources in combination with strategically important organizational processes to affect a desired end. The way in which corporate entrepreneurs utilize their resources is likely to have a more significant effect on performance than is merely having control of them. The current research aims to elaborate on how corporate entrepreneurs can become more resourceful by using a vacillation approach to resource acquisition and utilization. In this context, vacillation is movement between exploration and exploitation, or knowledge acquisition and knowledge integration from a knowledge management perspective. Vacillation is distinguished from the “balance” hypothesis prevalent in the organizational ambidexterity literature. A balance hypothesis states that both exploration and exploitation may be pursued simultaneously either by creating structural or contextual organizational ambidexterity. Here, we explain how vacillation enables an organization’s corporate entrepreneurship posture to lead to improved performance. In this chapter, we first describe the extant literature and construct relationships between corporate entrepreneurship posture, organizational resource level, vacillation, and organizational performance. We then analyze the learning processes associated with vacillation and discuss the research and managerial implications associated with the proposed relationships.

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Entrepreneurial Resourcefulness: Competing With Constraints
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-018-5

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Book part
Publication date: 27 April 2004

Matthew E Archibald

This paper analyzes a multidimensional model of organizational legitimacy, competencies, and resources in order to develop the linkage between institutional and resource

Abstract

This paper analyzes a multidimensional model of organizational legitimacy, competencies, and resources in order to develop the linkage between institutional and resource-based perspectives by systematically detailing relationships among these factors and organizational viability. The underlying mechanisms of isomorphism and market partitioning serve as a point of departure by which the effects on organizational persistence of two sociocultural processes, cultural (constitutive) legitimation and sociopolitical (regulative) legitimation, are distinguished. Using data on 589 national self-help/mutual-aid organizations, this chapter explores how isomorphism and market partitioning foster legitimacy and promote organizational viability. Results show that the more differentiated an organization’s core competencies and resources, the greater the sociopolitical legitimacy; the more isomorphic an organization’s competencies and resources, the greater the cultural legitimacy. The latter isomorphic processes, however, do not promote greater organizational viability. In fact, while isomorphism legitimates with respect to cultural recognition, it is heterogeneity, not homogeneity, that promotes organizational survival.

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Legitimacy Processes in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-008-1

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2007

Curt B. Moore, Chad W. Autry and Barry A. Macy

This chapter introduces the term “interpreneurship” to refer to entrepreneurship that occurs through inter-organizational alliances, which represent a salient vehicle for…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the term “interpreneurship” to refer to entrepreneurship that occurs through inter-organizational alliances, which represent a salient vehicle for combining complementary resources and capabilities across firms in order to gain a competitive advantage. The interpreneurship concept implies the integration of internal (firm) and external (network) resources through alliance formation and management. The purpose of this research is to introduce social structure to the rational action paradigm by examining the complementarity of entrepreneurial and relational resources in achieving organizational goals in an alliance context. In this study, interpreneurial capability is operationalized as the combination of entrepreneurial resources (via an internal growth strategy) with relational resources (via an external growth strategy). These effects are assessed through the examination of three competing research models. The hypothesized interaction-only model tests the impact of complementarity of entrepreneurial and relational resources on firm-level performance for both partners to an alliance. A second model tests relational resources as a mediator of the relationship between entrepreneurial resources and the alliance partners’ performance. Finally, a third model assumes that the two resources have independent effects on the alliance partners’ performance. We find that the interaction-only model yields the strongest relationship to organizational performance, supporting the interpreneurial perspective we proffer in this chapter.

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Entrepreneurial Strategic Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1429-4

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Alka Rai and Ginni Chawla

This study aims to test the hypothesized moderated mediation process combining job resources, job demands, work engagement, job satisfaction and organizational engagement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the hypothesized moderated mediation process combining job resources, job demands, work engagement, job satisfaction and organizational engagement, which proposes that work engagement can be considered as a mediator between the relationship of job resources with job satisfaction and organizational engagement, and such mediation effect is moderated by level of job demand.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from Junior Management Grade–Scale I officers of 442 branches of 27 public sector banks situated across four States in North India. The final responses stood at 704. Regression analyses was performed through the SPSS macro (developed by Preacher and Hayes, 2004) for testing of H1 and H2 on the mediation effects. H3 was tested by moderated hierarchical regression analysis. The last two H4 and H5 proposing the moderated mediation mechanism were examined in lines with the four conditions suggested by Muller et al. (2005) and Preacher et al. (2007).

Findings

It is suggested that job demands should ideally be adequate and job resources ample to deal with the former, because a suitable fit between these two aspects is related to work engagement, which would further contribute positively to job satisfaction and organizational engagement.

Originality/value

There is dearth of research hypothesizing the moderated mediation process proposing job demands as a moderator in job resources, work and organizational engagement and other work-related outcome relationships. Resting on various propositions and of job demands–resources (JD-R) model, and empirical outcomes of the studies of JD-R perspective, and research gaps identified, this study attempts to propose a unique model of engagement hypothesizing a moderated mediation process, where work engagement might be a mediator between the relationship of job resources with job satisfaction and organizational engagement; such mediation effect is moderated by the level of job demands.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Wenchen Guo and Mengxin Chen

This paper aims to clarify the factors that affect the formation of organizational human capital competitive advantage (OHCCA) and construct its structural dimensions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the factors that affect the formation of organizational human capital competitive advantage (OHCCA) and construct its structural dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

This research method adopted grounded theory using 20 interviews of managers from 10 companies. Relevant literature was reviewed to conduct open coding, Axial coding and selective coding to ensure OHCCA concept and dimensions.

Findings

Studies have shown that OHCCA formation of results from investment and collaboration of three levels: organization, teams and departments and employees. OHCCA formation is composed of three dimensions of organizational human capital investment: planning, practice and stock.

Research limitations/implications

This research enriches the organizational human capital and competitive advantage theories.

Practical implications

The practical significance is to provide theoretical and practical guidance for organizations in creating OHCCAs.

Originality/value

This research is the first to propose and define the OHCCA concept and construct a three-dimensional structure model. Furthermore, this research has revealed the leading factors that affect OHCCA's formation process.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Nilay Bıçakcıoğlu-Peynirci and Mustafa Tanyeri

Building upon insights from institutional theory and resource-based view (RBV), the aim of this study is to investigate the direct effects of stakeholder pressures on…

Abstract

Purpose

Building upon insights from institutional theory and resource-based view (RBV), the aim of this study is to investigate the direct effects of stakeholder pressures on organizational resources, organizational capabilities and green export business strategy and to explore the indirect impacts of organizational resources and capabilities on the link between stakeholder pressure and green business strategy from an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was conducted to test the conceptual model within this study. In total, 235 questionnaires were collected from Turkish exporting manufacturing companies and the data was analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the study demonstrated that stakeholder pressures have strong and positive effects on organizational resources and organizational capabilities for firms from emerging markets. Also, organizational resources, capabilities and stakeholder pressures have significant impacts on green export business strategy, which in turn, influences positively export market and financial performance.

Practical implications

Several implications were presented in this study via examining the forces affecting companies' environmental strategies and how implementing these strategies result in favorable gains in their international operations for emerging country exporters.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study lies in the under-researched context, in discussing the mutually and contradictory roles played by stakeholders and in examining determinants of the adoption of green strategies by emerging-market exporters. In this sense, stakeholders make the life of the company tougher at home by demanding a greener posture; on the other hand, by doing so, they prompt the company to be competitive when selling to developed markets.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Simon L. Albrecht

Worker well‐being continues to be fundamental to the study of work and a primary consideration for how organizations can achieve competitive advantage and sustainable and…

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9541

Abstract

Purpose

Worker well‐being continues to be fundamental to the study of work and a primary consideration for how organizations can achieve competitive advantage and sustainable and ethical work practices (Cartwright and Holmes; Harter, Schmidt and Keyes; Wright and Cropanzano). The science and practice of employee engagement, a key indicator of employee well‐being, continues to evolve with ongoing incremental refinements to existing models and measures. This study aims to elaborate the Job Demands‐Resources model of work engagement (Bakker and Demerouti) by examining how organizational, team and job level factors interrelate to influence engagement and well‐being and downstream outcome variables such as affective commitment and extra‐role behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equations modelling of survey data obtained from 3,437 employees of a large multi‐national mining company was used to test the important direct and indirect influence of organizational focused resources (a culture of fairness and support), team focused resources (team climate) and job level resources (career development, autonomy, supervisor support, and role clarity) on employee well‐being, engagement, extra‐role behaviour and organizational commitment.

Findings

The fit of the proposed measurement and structural models met criterion levels and the structural model accounted for sizable proportions of the variance in engagement/wellbeing (66 percent), extra‐role‐behaviour (52 percent) and commitment (69 percent).

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations (e.g. cross‐sectional research design) and future opportunities are outlined.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates important extensions to the Job Demands‐Resources model and provides researchers and practitioners with a simple but powerful motivational framework, a suite of measures, and a map of their inter‐relationships which can be used to help understand, develop and manage employee well‐being and engagement and their outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Daria Lupsa, Loreni Baciu and Delia Virga

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and organizational justice (distributive and procedural), as a contextual resource, in enhancing health through work engagement. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 193 Romanian social workers (87.60 percent women) from the national network was used to test two structural models.

Findings

Structural equation modeling analysis revealed that work engagement partially mediates the relationship between PsyCap and health, and work engagement totally mediates the relationship between organizational justice and health.

Research limitations/implications

The results emphasize the role of resources, PsyCap and organizational justice, in protecting the social workers’ health.

Practical implications

These findings support the necessity of combined evidence-based programs to develop social worker’s PsyCap and to maintain the optimum level of perceived organizational justice. These intervention programs can, in turn, enhance the work engagement and protect the health of employees in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study indicates a novel conceptual model that has two simultaneous predictors of work engagement and health. It provides insights into how contextual resources (organizational justice) potentiate the effect of personal resources (PsyCap) in enhancing health.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Simon Albrecht, Emil Breidahl and Andrew Marty

The majority of job demands-resources (JD-R) research has focused on identifying the job demands, job resources, and personal resources that influence engagement. The…

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4240

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of job demands-resources (JD-R) research has focused on identifying the job demands, job resources, and personal resources that influence engagement. The purpose of this paper is to assess the significance of proposed associations between organizationally focused resources, organizational engagement climate, and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a model proposing that six specific organizational resources would have positive associations with organizational engagement climate, and positive direct and indirect associations with job resources and employee engagement. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted on cross-sectional survey data provided by 1,578 employees working in a range of different organizations.

Findings

The CFA and SEM analyses yielded good fit to the data. As proposed, all six organizational resources were positively associated with organizational engagement climate. Four were positively associated with job resources, and two were positively associated with engagement. Organizational engagement climate was positively associated with job resources and employee engagement. Significant indirect relationships were also observed.

Research limitations/implications

Despite self-reported data and a cross-sectional design, tests of common method variance did not suggest substantive method effects. Overall, the results contribute new insights about what may influence engagement, and highlight the importance of organizational engagement climate as a motivational construct.

Practical implications

The research offers up potentially useful measures of six organizational resources and a measure of organizational engagement climate that can complement and broaden the current focus on job-level diagnostics. As such, targeted management action and survey feedback processes can be used to identify processes to build sustainable organizational engagement capability.

Originality/value

No previous research has identified a comprehensive set of organizational resources, operationalized organizational engagement climate, or examined their relationships within a JD-R context. The results suggest that the JD-R can perhaps usefully be extended to include more organizationally focused constructs.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Yi‐Chia Chiu and Yi‐Ching Liaw

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to reconcile previous views of the relationship between organizational slack and performance by examining the influences of…

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2613

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to reconcile previous views of the relationship between organizational slack and performance by examining the influences of heterogeneous corporate strategy and different slack resources. Differences in performance resulting from variations in slack can also be moderated by strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model was tested by examining operating and financial information from 529 Taiwan high‐tech companies during the period 1997‐2005. Owing to the study, data were both cross‐sectional (across firms) and time series (over years), a panel data approach were applied for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The results broadly demonstrate that relationships differ based on strategy and organizational slack. Additionally, this study is the first to empirically identify a U‐shaped relationship between slack and performance, indicating that, in certain circumstances, either more or less slack is better for performance.

Originality/value

The results support a dynamic perspective regarding the slack‐performance relationship was proposed for different strategy and different types of slack resources. Moreover, the authors argue that not only resource heterogeneity, but also firm strategic orientation, should be considered when performing change activities. Restated, the authors believe the best interest for a firm aspiring to conduct organizational change behaviors is to maintain the “fitness” among the environment, strategy orientation, and slack resources will induce higher performance. This study, thus demonstrates how organizational change behaviors are influenced by slack resources and strategy heterogeneity.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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