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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Siphe Zantsi, Louw Petrus Pienaar and Jan C. Greyling

Understanding diversity amongst potential beneficiaries of land redistribution is of critical importance for both design and planning of successful land reform…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding diversity amongst potential beneficiaries of land redistribution is of critical importance for both design and planning of successful land reform interventions. This study seeks to add to the existing literature on farming types, with specific emphasis on understanding diversity within a sub-group of commercially oriented or emerging smallholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multivariate statistical analysis – principal component and cluster analyses applied to a sample of 442 commercially-oriented smallholders – five distinct clusters of emerging farmers are identified, using variables related to farmers' characteristics, income and expenditure and farm production indicators and willingness to participate in land redistribution. The five clusters are discussed in light of a predefined selection criteria that is based on the current policies and scholarly thinking.

Findings

The results suggest that there are distinct differences in farming types, and each identified cluster of farmers requires tailored support for the effective implementation of land reform. The identified homogenous sub-groups of smallholders, allows us to understand which farmers could be a better target for a successful land redistribution policy.

Originality/value

Most of the existing typology studies in South Africa tend to focus on general smallholders and in the Eastern Cape province; this study extends the literature by focussing on specific prime beneficiaries of land reform in three provinces. This study uses a more detailed dataset than the Statistics general and agricultural household surveys.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Zuhui Huang, Vijay Vyas and Qiao Liang

Agriculture sectors in China and India are going through rapid changes. There is a shift in demand pattern, significant changes in the supply chain, greater competition…

Abstract

Purpose

Agriculture sectors in China and India are going through rapid changes. There is a shift in demand pattern, significant changes in the supply chain, greater competition due to opening up of the domestic and external markets and fuller integration with rest of the economy. These developments have impacted traditional agriculture and its institutional underpinning. Latter are being transformed and new institutions are coming into existence. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the changes in economy and the agricultural sector, explores institutional responses in terms of various producer organizations in the two countries, and examines their adequacy for the coming phase of agricultural development in China and India.

Findings

The co-existence of various farmer organizations will sustain for a long period in both China and India. Overall, they have benefitted agriculture producers, and more particularly the surplus generating farmers. However, the incompatibility between these and the vast and growing small farm sector is not disappearing. Next set of institutional reforms should address this critical question of “reaching the unreached.”

Originality/value

China and India are the world’s two largest countries in terms of population as well as agricultural population. They share a lot of common features. This paper discusses the changes in agricultural sector, explores institutional responses in terms of farmer organizations, and examines their adequacy for the coming phase of agricultural development in China and India, which has never been seen before.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Verena Bitzer and Jos Bijman

Building on recent advances in innovation research on developing country agriculture, this paper explores the concept of co-innovation, i.e. innovations that combine…

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2012

Abstract

Purpose

Building on recent advances in innovation research on developing country agriculture, this paper explores the concept of co-innovation, i.e. innovations that combine technological, organisational and institutional changes and that encompass different actors in and around the value chain. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a further conceptualisation of co-innovation and show its usefulness for analysing innovation initiatives in agrifood chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines two streams of literature (innovation systems and value chains) and is based on a review of the experiences with innovation in three different value chains in three African countries: potato in Ethiopia, pineapple in Benin and citrus in South Africa.

Findings

Co-innovation is the combination of collaborative, complementary and coordinated innovation. “Collaborative” refers to the multi-actor character of the innovation process, where each actor brings in specific knowledge and resources. “Complementary” indicates the smart combination of technological, organisational and institutional innovation. “Coordinated” draws attention to the importance of chain-wide adjustments and changes to make innovation in one stage of the chain a success.

Practical implications

The identified dimensions of co-innovation (the triple “co-”) provide a practical guide for the design of effective interventions aimed at promoting innovation in African agrifood chains.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to provide a comprehensive conceptualisation of co-innovation. On the basis of both theoretical arguments and evidence from three illustrative case studies it is argued that successful innovation in agrifood chains requires the innovation process to be collaborative, coordinated and complementary.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Details

Labor Relations in Globalized Food
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-711-5

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Samuel Onyango Omondi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the profitability of urban chicken production in the medium-sized cities of Kisumu and Thika, Kenya.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the profitability of urban chicken production in the medium-sized cities of Kisumu and Thika, Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in 2016 from a sample of 157 indigenous chicken producers in the two cities. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize indigenous chicken production, marketing and profitability. In addition, multivariate regression models were estimated to determine factors influencing profitability of the enterprise.

Findings

Urban indigenous chicken production mainly serves a dual role of food provision and income generation. The enterprise is profitable, generating an average gross margin of Ksh. 756/bird. The multivariate regression models show that access to high-value markets, household income level and the type of production system used significantly affect profitability of indigenous chicken farming. However, poultry diseases and high input costs especially feed are the major constraints to poultry farming.

Research limitations/implications

This study has used cross-sectional data that provides information for only one point in time. Future research should be able to capture the seasonality of indigenous chicken production.

Social implications

This study has shown that indigenous chicken production in urban areas is a viable and profitable enterprise, which could provide an avenue for employment and income generation.

Originality/value

Studies assessing profitability of urban agricultural enterprises are scant. Thus, this study provides insights on the profitability of a common urban agriculture enterprise.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Zuhui Huang and Qiao Liang

During the past four decades, agriculture and rural development in China has scored a great progress. Organization institution in agriculture is one of the domains with…

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1478

Abstract

Purpose

During the past four decades, agriculture and rural development in China has scored a great progress. Organization institution in agriculture is one of the domains with drastic innovations. The purpose of this paper is to map the emergence and evolution of various agricultural organizations in China since 1978. Development status and the trend of agricultural organization system are analyzed. Further, the role of farmer cooperatives is discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data used in the paper are mainly from statistical yearbooks and documents published by the government including Ministry of Agriculture and Bureau of Industry and Commercial. Both descriptive and deductive analyses are adopted to achieve different analytical purposes.

Findings

The vast small-farm sector, co-existence of various types of organizations, and innovation of other organizations will continue and sustain for a long-time period in China. Despite the fast development of modern farmers and various organizations, it is important that traditional farmers participate effectively in modern agriculture. Farmers act collectively via a cooperative in a desirable way, which determines the central position of farmer cooperatives in the agricultural organization system.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a qualitative analysis on agricultural organizations in China, yet no quantitative estimation regarding the comparison of various organizations is conducted due to insufficient data.

Originality/value

This paper fills the gap of a comprehensive review of the emergence, development status, and trend of agricultural organizations in China.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Xiaoyong Zhang and Lusine H. Aramyan

Chinese agri‐food chains consist of the millions of small scale farmers, who are not well structured and organized in the supply chain. Owing to market liberalization and…

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3280

Abstract

Purpose

Chinese agri‐food chains consist of the millions of small scale farmers, who are not well structured and organized in the supply chain. Owing to market liberalization and globalization, one of the most challenging issues along agri‐food chains in China is becoming the issue of how to link these small‐scale farmers into the modern chains. Consequently, it is essential for both policy makers and private sectors to understand the governance structure in agri‐food supply chains. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework for supply chain governance, including its antecedents and consequences, as well as a series of hypotheses for empirical testing.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework of chain governance is proposed in this study, where governance structure consists of two dimensions: contractual governance and relational governance. The study intends to propose a complementary relationship between contracts and relational aspects, such as trust, in the Chinese context. Future research is needed to empirically test this model.

Findings

The proposed conceptual model is unique, since the majority of the articles addressing this topic focuses on contract farming while limited research touches upon the issues of trust and relations. However, a combination of both contracting and relationships are seldom addressed.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates a novel concept of two dimensional governance structure in the agri‐food supply chain, where transaction cost economics theory and relational theory are combined to study the governance relationships between small scale producers in China and their buyers.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Gry Agnete Alsos, Elisabet Ljunggren and Liv Toril Pettersen

This exploratory study combines three theoretical approaches to investigate why farmers start additional business activities: the rural sociology perspective, the…

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4666

Abstract

This exploratory study combines three theoretical approaches to investigate why farmers start additional business activities: the rural sociology perspective, the opportunity perspective and the resource‐based perspective – as applied within entrepreneurship research. Building on in‐depth interviews of respondents from Norwegian farm households, three types of entrepreneurs were identified: the pluriactive farmer, the resource exploiting entrepreneur and the portfolio entrepreneur. These entrepreneurial types differed in regard to their basic motivation and objectives for start‐up, the source of their business ideas, the basis of competitive position and the connectivity between the new business and the farm, as well as in several other ways.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Ziyanda Mpetile and Willie Chinyamurindi

The transformation of the agricultural landscape is deemed as an essential nation-building priority in post-democratic South Africa. Part of the activity of transformation…

Abstract

Purpose

The transformation of the agricultural landscape is deemed as an essential nation-building priority in post-democratic South Africa. Part of the activity of transformation is affording disenfranchised groups opportunity to participate in careers where they were excluded. The purpose of the study is to investigate the motivational factors that influenced emerging Black farmers as entrepreneurs to choose agriculture as a career path in post-democratic South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative study using a semi-structured interview technique. The sample comprised of 29 emerging Black entrepreneurs working within the agriculture context in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.

Findings

Upon analysis, the individual stories of Black emerging farmers as entrepreneurs showed the role of personal influences; the community; the quest for financial influence through economic sustenance; and socio-economic influences as playing a part in informing career entrance into agriculture amongst the Black emerging farmers.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation, familiar with qualitative research, concerns the use of a small sample size. However, a strength of the study is the in-depth focus, especially through interviews lasting a minimum of 1 h.

Practical implications

This study answers the call for a contemporary understanding of career processes in professions such as agriculture that have not received attention. This can be a practical basis to encourage more recent entrants into occupations and entrepreneurial pursuits that have been restricted. This study thus offers a practical basis for career counselling interventions in the agricultural space. This includes farmer training and development opportunities and provision of financial support to Black farmers.

Social implications

The findings offer insight into the role of a range of socially embedded factors and how they influence occupational aspirations and individuals fulfilling their entrepreneurial pursuits.

Originality/value

This study ignites focus into an under-researched area, especially on the African continent.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2013

Dionisio Ortiz-Miranda, Ana Moragues-Faus and Eladio Arnalte-Alegre

This introductory chapter evidences the need to push again to the fore research undertaken in Southern European countries, highlighting its Mediterranean features and how…

Abstract

This introductory chapter evidences the need to push again to the fore research undertaken in Southern European countries, highlighting its Mediterranean features and how they relate to old and new theoretical and political debates. Consequently, in this first chapter we describe the main aim of the book as well as how the subsequent chapters contribute to fulfill this quest outlining the structure of the book.

Details

Agriculture in Mediterranean Europe: Between Old and New Paradigms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-597-5

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