Search results

1 – 10 of 423
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Edgar Burns

After the 1907 collapse of the new Otago University Veterinary School, a gap of over half a century elapsed before the Massey University Veterinary Faculty was opened in…

Abstract

After the 1907 collapse of the new Otago University Veterinary School, a gap of over half a century elapsed before the Massey University Veterinary Faculty was opened in 1964. This interval means linear professionalisation accounts from pre‐modern animal care by farriers and cow leeches to modern cadres of scientific veterinarians are challenged by contingent and particular features in the New Zealand setting. The educational sequence is inevitably linked with other aspects of society, economy and workforce around the veterinary ‘professional project’. Limited research into veterinary development and education in New Zealand includes accounts by veterinarians ‐ Laing’s monographs,4 Shortridge, Smith and Gardner’s history of the veterinary profession, and Burns’ historical sociology thesis.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Natalie Stevens and Edgar Burns

The Internet has been heralded as having the potential to completely revolutionise the way organisations conduct their business and cited as the most rapidly adopted…

Abstract

The Internet has been heralded as having the potential to completely revolutionise the way organisations conduct their business and cited as the most rapidly adopted medium of our time. This study investigates Internet usage in the context of Hawke's Bay wineries within New Zealand. Although web potential has been well documented, the reality lags somewhat behind. A survey of thirty‐six Hawke's Bay winery websites was conducted applying a content analysis method previously used within the international wine sector. The results show positive adoption of current web technology. However, the analysis shows potential still remains for better utilisation by wineries of the web. There appears to be significant room to add value to websites and emphasise a range of brand and relationship building activities. Such a policy could confer competitive advantage and add another option for global exposure for wineries committed to incorporating a fully functioning web dimension into their long‐term marketing strategy. International markets will increase in importance as New Zealand wine production continues to rise steeply.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Diana Roeg, Ien van de Goor and Henk Garretsen

The Dutch are not afraid of getting their hands dirty in order to get things done. Faced with increasing numbers of chaotic drug users with little hope or inclination of…

Abstract

The Dutch are not afraid of getting their hands dirty in order to get things done. Faced with increasing numbers of chaotic drug users with little hope or inclination of contacting services, Dutch treatment services have developed a controversial way of getting normally out‐of‐reach clients into care. Based on a treatment model for care in the community patients, drug and alcohol services are resorting to ‘friendly’ persuasion to get people the help they need. This is a historical perspective on ‘interferential’ care and how it can be applied to treatment in the substance misuse field.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Stephanie W. Hartwell

Current thinking suggests that specialized services are needed for the successful community reintegration of ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities (Hartwell & Orr…

Abstract

Current thinking suggests that specialized services are needed for the successful community reintegration of ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities (Hartwell & Orr (1999). Psychiatric Services, 50, 1220–1222; Healey (1999). National Institute of Justice, February; Hartwell, Friedman, & Orr (2001). New England Journal of Public Policy, 19, 73–82). Nevertheless, stable community re-entry after criminal incarceration involves the response of multiple organizations due to the complexity of community re-entry factors. This chapter presents findings from the analysis of secondary data collected since 1998 and a qualitative interview study with ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities that identified pathways and turning points influencing community re-entry. Using Sampson and Laub's life course theory as a framework (Sampson & Laub (1993). Crime in the making: Pathways and turning points through life. Cambridge, MA: Harward University Press.), the pathways and turning points offer a point of departure for agencies and organizations in responding to ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities in the community. Pathways related to service needs at release include race, age, education, diagnosis, and criminal history; whether an individual is on probation or parole; and whether an individual has a history of homelessness, mental health services, and/or substance abuse. Turning points post release include institutional resource availability, living arrangements, psychotropic medication compliance, outpatient therapy and substance abuse treatment, and having entitlements and benefits in place at release.

Details

The Organizational Response to Persons with Mental Illness Involved with the Criminal Justice System
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-231-3

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Kerry A Thomas and Debra J Rickwood

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recovery environment of a sub-acute residential mental health service. Such services are increasingly filling a gap in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recovery environment of a sub-acute residential mental health service. Such services are increasingly filling a gap in the continuum of care for people with recurrent mental illness and have a major role supporting the processes of recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used with clients and staff completing the recovery enhancing environment measure. Nine clients who had entered the service from the community (step-up), 18 who had transferred from an inpatient unit (step-down) and ten staff completed the measure.

Findings

Clients and staff rated the organisational climate of the service positively, with the role of caring staff being identified as particularly valuable. Clients and staff had similar positive views on the importance of recovery-based elements and rated the service as performing well in these areas. Step-up clients identified performance gaps in the areas of self-management, general health, personal strengths, and personal relationships. Step-down clients identified a range of gaps, including meeting basic needs, empowerment, and fundamental recovery processes.

Practical implications

An assessment of the perceptions of clients and staff can allow services to identify differences in the attitudes of each group and ascertain areas in which the service can be improved to better meet the needs of individual clients. This may include being responsive to the setting from which clients have entered the service.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has examined the recovery environment of a residential mental health service and how it meets the recovery needs of both step-up and step-down admissions.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-785-0

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1924

OUR readers will, we trust, appreciate our double souvenir number issued in connection with the Library Association Conference at Glasgow. Special features are the…

Abstract

OUR readers will, we trust, appreciate our double souvenir number issued in connection with the Library Association Conference at Glasgow. Special features are the articles on the Mitchell Library, Glasgow, 1874–1924, by a member of the staff, Mr. J. Dunlop, and one on the Burns Country, by Mr. J. M. Leighton, of Greenock Public Library. We printed the provisional programme in our July issue and as we go to press have little to add to the particulars there given, except to compliment the Library Association and the Local Reception Committee on the excellent programme arranged for the occasion, from both the professional and social point of view.

Details

New Library World, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Pamela Palmer

In recent years, the number of journals focusing on a single literary figure has increased substantially. No longer are only a few select authors the sole focus of a…

Abstract

In recent years, the number of journals focusing on a single literary figure has increased substantially. No longer are only a few select authors the sole focus of a journal or newsletter. With the proliferation of single‐author periodicals, implications for their use in locating literary criticism increases the importance of identifying such publications and recommending them to users. The importance of the effective use of journals devoted to a single author is highlighted by the fact that many such titles are not indexed in MLA International Bibliography, long deemed the most complete of the traditional sources for locating literary criticism. Perhaps the greatest strength of the relatively recent American Humanities Index lies is its coverage of single‐author titles. Humanities Index and Abstracts for English Studies also provide access to such journals. Arts and Humanities Citation Index does include a number of the titles too, but it is relatively difficult to use because of its subject approach.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Cristiano Busco and Robert W. Scapens

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, roles and dynamics of change of management accounting systems (MAS), in processes of continuous organisational learning…

5655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, roles and dynamics of change of management accounting systems (MAS), in processes of continuous organisational learning and transformation. By studying the interaction between the accounting (and finance) function and the implementation of a Six‐sigma initiative, as the engine for organisational change, the authors seek to uncover the potential of measurement‐based systems of management for aligning business processes with corporate strategies. Such systems sustain continuous processes of transformation by infusing organisational culture with financial and non‐financial metrics of accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a longitudinal case study in which one of the authors had the opportunity to exercise what Schein called the clinical perspective; i.e. combining the role of researcher with that of helper‐consultant. There is mutual interdependence in the relationship between the authors' theoretical framework and the authors' longitudinal case study. While, on the one hand, the case research contributed to the search for an institutional explanation of the evidence experienced and collected, on the other hand, the empirical data are illuminated by the theoretical insights gained from that framework.

Findings

After first discussing cultural change, the authors rely both on the “clinical” position of one of the authors as researcher/helper‐consultant and on the insights provided by Schein's work on organisational culture and Giddens' structuration theory to develop an institutional framework for interpreting the ways in which routinised systems of accountability bind the ongoing processes of cultural transformation across time and space.

Research limitations/implications

Possible limitations are: the conceptualisation of organisational culture as a shared and institutional phenomenon does not take account of wider anthropological aspects (such as the influence of national culture); the role of helper‐consultant as well as researcher may have influenced some of the authors' interpretations; the authors' analysis does not consider macro‐economic variables; and only a small percentage of shop‐floor workers were interviewed.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on the role of management accounting within organisational processes of transformation far beyond their mere visible enactment. As a result, the authors develop an institutional framework to interpret the linkages between the cognitive dynamics which characterise organisational culture (viewed as shared cognitive schemas) and the behavioural and structural modalities through which they are drawn upon and reproduced by organisational members.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

134

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

1 – 10 of 423