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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Edgar Burns

After the 1907 collapse of the new Otago University Veterinary School, a gap of over half a century elapsed before the Massey University Veterinary Faculty was opened in 1964…

Abstract

After the 1907 collapse of the new Otago University Veterinary School, a gap of over half a century elapsed before the Massey University Veterinary Faculty was opened in 1964. This interval means linear professionalisation accounts from pre‐modern animal care by farriers and cow leeches to modern cadres of scientific veterinarians are challenged by contingent and particular features in the New Zealand setting. The educational sequence is inevitably linked with other aspects of society, economy and workforce around the veterinary ‘professional project’. Limited research into veterinary development and education in New Zealand includes accounts by veterinarians ‐ Laing’s monographs,4 Shortridge, Smith and Gardner’s history of the veterinary profession, and Burns’ historical sociology thesis.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Natalie Stevens and Edgar Burns

The Internet has been heralded as having the potential to completely revolutionise the way organisations conduct their business and cited as the most rapidly adopted medium of our…

Abstract

The Internet has been heralded as having the potential to completely revolutionise the way organisations conduct their business and cited as the most rapidly adopted medium of our time. This study investigates Internet usage in the context of Hawke's Bay wineries within New Zealand. Although web potential has been well documented, the reality lags somewhat behind. A survey of thirty‐six Hawke's Bay winery websites was conducted applying a content analysis method previously used within the international wine sector. The results show positive adoption of current web technology. However, the analysis shows potential still remains for better utilisation by wineries of the web. There appears to be significant room to add value to websites and emphasise a range of brand and relationship building activities. Such a policy could confer competitive advantage and add another option for global exposure for wineries committed to incorporating a fully functioning web dimension into their long‐term marketing strategy. International markets will increase in importance as New Zealand wine production continues to rise steeply.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2023

Bahar Manouchehri, Edgar A. Burns, Ayyoob Sharifi and Sina Davoudi

Children comprise a significant component of developing countries’ populations, but are rarely present in a substantive way in urban decision-making. The first step toward…

Abstract

Children comprise a significant component of developing countries’ populations, but are rarely present in a substantive way in urban decision-making. The first step toward changing the exclusion of children in urban planning is through analyzing the roots of the problem. Applying a critical approach, this research aimed to explore and challenge the structural patterns of society that exclude children and marginalize them in the case of Iran. The present study interviewed Iranian urban planning professionals in a range of roles, to explore the roots of the persistent failure to incorporate children’s voices. The findings revealed various obstacles to including children: on the one hand, these impediments consisted of broad macro-level barriers derived from the cultural context; on the other, obstacles included micro-level barriers associated with planning processes and the urban management system. Together these embedded sociocultural roots provide insights into mechanisms maintaining a top-down approach and preventing it from shifting to a more inclusive and child-friendly approach in planning modern Iranian cities.

Details

Sociological Research and Urban Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-444-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2023

Abstract

Details

Sociological Research and Urban Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-444-2

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2023

Rachel Berman, Patrizia Albanese and Xiaobei Chen

In keeping with the long-standing focus on cities and urbanism in sociology, the researchers in this volume contribute to our knowledge of children, youth, and the city. These…

Abstract

In keeping with the long-standing focus on cities and urbanism in sociology, the researchers in this volume contribute to our knowledge of children, youth, and the city. These scholars take up ideas connected to agency, belonging, citizenship, identity, participation, power, and relationality and explore both historical and contemporary ways children and youth co-construct, contribute to, are constructed by, navigate, negotiate, and resist their urban social worlds and urban relationships.

Details

Sociological Research and Urban Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-444-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Diana Roeg, Ien van de Goor and Henk Garretsen

The Dutch are not afraid of getting their hands dirty in order to get things done. Faced with increasing numbers of chaotic drug users with little hope or inclination of…

Abstract

The Dutch are not afraid of getting their hands dirty in order to get things done. Faced with increasing numbers of chaotic drug users with little hope or inclination of contacting services, Dutch treatment services have developed a controversial way of getting normally out‐of‐reach clients into care. Based on a treatment model for care in the community patients, drug and alcohol services are resorting to ‘friendly’ persuasion to get people the help they need. This is a historical perspective on ‘interferential’ care and how it can be applied to treatment in the substance misuse field.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Stephanie W. Hartwell

Current thinking suggests that specialized services are needed for the successful community reintegration of ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities (Hartwell & Orr (1999)…

Abstract

Current thinking suggests that specialized services are needed for the successful community reintegration of ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities (Hartwell & Orr (1999). Psychiatric Services, 50, 1220–1222; Healey (1999). National Institute of Justice, February; Hartwell, Friedman, & Orr (2001). New England Journal of Public Policy, 19, 73–82). Nevertheless, stable community re-entry after criminal incarceration involves the response of multiple organizations due to the complexity of community re-entry factors. This chapter presents findings from the analysis of secondary data collected since 1998 and a qualitative interview study with ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities that identified pathways and turning points influencing community re-entry. Using Sampson and Laub's life course theory as a framework (Sampson & Laub (1993). Crime in the making: Pathways and turning points through life. Cambridge, MA: Harward University Press.), the pathways and turning points offer a point of departure for agencies and organizations in responding to ex-inmates with psychiatric disabilities in the community. Pathways related to service needs at release include race, age, education, diagnosis, and criminal history; whether an individual is on probation or parole; and whether an individual has a history of homelessness, mental health services, and/or substance abuse. Turning points post release include institutional resource availability, living arrangements, psychotropic medication compliance, outpatient therapy and substance abuse treatment, and having entitlements and benefits in place at release.

Details

The Organizational Response to Persons with Mental Illness Involved with the Criminal Justice System
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-231-3

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2024

Robert J. Kane, Jordan M. Hyatt and Matthew J. Teti

The paper examines the historical shifts in policing strategies towards individuals with SMI and vulnerable populations, highlighting the development of co-response models…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the historical shifts in policing strategies towards individuals with SMI and vulnerable populations, highlighting the development of co-response models, introducing the concept of “untethered” co-response.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a review of literature to trace the evolution of police responses to individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) and vulnerable populations. It categorizes four generations of police approaches—zero-policing, over-policing, crisis intervention and co-response—and introduces a fifth generation, the “untethered” co-response model exemplified by Project SCOPE in Philadelphia.

Findings

The review identifies historical patterns of police response to SMI individuals, emphasizing the challenges and consequences associated with over-policing. It outlines the evolution from crisis intervention teams to co-response models and introduces Project SCOPE as an innovative “untethered” co-response approach.

Research limitations/implications

The research acknowledges the challenges in evaluating the effectiveness of crisis intervention teams and co-response models due to variations in implementation and limited standardized models. It emphasizes the need for more rigorous research, including randomized controlled trials, to substantiate claims about the effectiveness of these models.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the “untethered” co-response model, exemplified by Project SCOPE, has the potential to positively impact criminal justice and social service outcomes for vulnerable populations. It encourages ongoing policy and evaluative research to inform evidence-based practice and mitigate collateral harms associated with policing responses.

Social implications

Given the rising interactions between police and individuals with mental health issues, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the paper highlights the urgency for innovative, non-policing-driven responses to vulnerable persons.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by proposing a fifth generation of police response to vulnerable persons, the “untethered” co-response model and presenting Project SCOPE as a practical example.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Kerry A Thomas and Debra J Rickwood

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recovery environment of a sub-acute residential mental health service. Such services are increasingly filling a gap in the continuum of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recovery environment of a sub-acute residential mental health service. Such services are increasingly filling a gap in the continuum of care for people with recurrent mental illness and have a major role supporting the processes of recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used with clients and staff completing the recovery enhancing environment measure. Nine clients who had entered the service from the community (step-up), 18 who had transferred from an inpatient unit (step-down) and ten staff completed the measure.

Findings

Clients and staff rated the organisational climate of the service positively, with the role of caring staff being identified as particularly valuable. Clients and staff had similar positive views on the importance of recovery-based elements and rated the service as performing well in these areas. Step-up clients identified performance gaps in the areas of self-management, general health, personal strengths, and personal relationships. Step-down clients identified a range of gaps, including meeting basic needs, empowerment, and fundamental recovery processes.

Practical implications

An assessment of the perceptions of clients and staff can allow services to identify differences in the attitudes of each group and ascertain areas in which the service can be improved to better meet the needs of individual clients. This may include being responsive to the setting from which clients have entered the service.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has examined the recovery environment of a residential mental health service and how it meets the recovery needs of both step-up and step-down admissions.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-785-0

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