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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2009

Aihwa Ong

Citizenship, as Sassen notes, is embedded in the nation-state, but by that logic cannot be “denationalized,” as she also claims in a contrarian move. While we can all…

Abstract

Citizenship, as Sassen notes, is embedded in the nation-state, but by that logic cannot be “denationalized,” as she also claims in a contrarian move. While we can all agree that transnational regimes of virtue or corporate largess are extending protections and services to a variety of marginalized groups regardless of national borders, these regimes do not replace but rather seek to supplement citizenship orders. Human rights regimes do not displace citizenship because they do not exist as formal legal relationship with enforceable rights and obligations to a territorialized citizenry. By contrast, only states can enforce (human rights as) citizenship rights. Certain conceptualizations of citizenship can be influenced by the discourse of human rights (as has been the case in China), but the transnational regimes of virtue cannot disembed citizenship from the state.

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Political Power and Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-667-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Ying-Yi Deng and Yi-Chun Yang

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer citizenship behavior in a restaurant context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a conceptual model, based on previous studies, hypothesizing that green attributes transparency engenders green brand image and green trust, which together facilitate green customer citizenship behavior. The authors used structural equations modeling with data collected from 312 consumers in Taiwan to do the analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that green attributes transparency plays a strong role in determining green brand image and green trust, which enhance green customer citizenship behavior. Managerial implications to aid businesses in developing strategies to enhance their ability to foster green citizenship behavior among its consumers for competitive advantage is also provided, together with an outline of the limitations of the study.

Originality/value

This study used the concept of stimulus–organism–response to test the stimuli of green attributes transparency to enhance customer citizenship behavior mediated by green brand image and green trust. This study makes two theoretical contributions. First, this study extended the concept of attributes transparency, brand image, trust and customer citizenship behavior to a green context. The authors developed a research framework and confirmed that green attributes transparency facilitate green brand image and green trust, which contribute to green customer citizenship behavior. Second, there is no prior study exploring the relationship between green attributes transparency, green brand image, green trust and green customer citizenship behavior. The empirical support for the model developed in this study is based on empirical data of Taiwan restaurant consumers.

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British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

My-Trinh Bui and Don Jyh-Fu Jeng

The purpose of this study is to investigate coproduction behavior in networking alumni communities via the progress from platform belongingness, knowledge sharing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate coproduction behavior in networking alumni communities via the progress from platform belongingness, knowledge sharing and citizenship behavior. Alumni networking communities have emerged as valuable assets for conserving institutional resources, supporting members and contributing new resources for alumni-institutional professional development. However, the previous literature has not yet captured the explicit processes by which these contributions are made.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 711 respondents selected from an alumni collaboration network were subjected to structural equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The study explored resource conservation (belongingness) as the primary relational mechanism for alumni to share their instrumental resources (knowledge sharing), supporting resources (citizenship behavior) and competent resources (coproduction behavior). Knowledge sharing and citizenship behavior act as intermediate agents to trigger coproduction behavior. The authors show how subjective norm, group norm and trust is regarded as a tool to reduce bonding intrusiveness (i.e. the intrusive side-effects of a bond) and moderate the indirect effect of belongingness on coproduction and the direct effect of citizenship on coproduction.

Research limitations/implications

By applying attachment theory, conservation of resources theory and digital platform networking perspectives, this study describes major implications for designing inspiring and compatible community platforms.

Practical implications

Guidance is provided for improving sustainable alumni communities through citizenship-sharing and coproduction behavior.

Social implications

Online alumni communities are regarded as resource conservators, which can result in valuable coproduction, via the sharing of knowledge, expertise and skillsets to create profit for a range of institutions and industries.

Originality/value

Alumni networking platforms encourage alumni cohesiveness, stimulate knowledge exchange and improve professionalism.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Shanika Lakmali and Kanagasabai Kajendra

This study aims to explore customer personality traits as an antecedent of customer citizenship behaviour which positively facilitates service providers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore customer personality traits as an antecedent of customer citizenship behaviour which positively facilitates service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows the positivism research paradigm. Hence, primary data were collected from 250 homestay visitors who stayed at five selected homestays located at Mirissa homestay zone, Sri Lanka.

Findings

The present study's findings reveal that “agreeableness,” “extraversion” and “conscientiousness” personality traits promote customer citizenship behaviour. Furthermore, the openness to “experience” trait identified to have a statistically insignificant relationship with CCB and neuroticism recorded a positive impact on the relationship between CCB and personality, contrary to the existing literature.

Practical implications

This study comprehensively explains how service providers should arrange their service facilities to increase customer willingness to perform citizenship behaviour, which helps develop their services.

Originality/value

Previous research has investigated that customer personality in terms of prosocial and proactive nature impacts CCBs. In contrast, the effect of Big Five personality traits on CCB is highlighted in this study.

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South Asian Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2719-2377

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Lucas Amaral Lauriano, Heiko Spitzeck and João Henrique Dutra Bueno

– This paper aims to present the state of corporate citizenship in Brazil.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the state of corporate citizenship in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of a survey of Brazilian companies is used to analyze the state of corporate citizenship in Brazil. The survey was constructed using the methodology developed by Mirvis & Googins on measuring the stage of corporate citizenship, and 172 valid responses from Brazilian companies were received.

Findings

Data suggest that Brazilian companies have an advanced understanding of corporate citizenship and the strategic intention to integrate citizenship into their business. When it comes to leadership, structures, issue management, stakeholder relationships and transparency, however, their maturity in terms of citizenship stays in less advanced stages. In sum, Brazilian companies are advanced in the concept but less developed in the practice of corporate citizenship.

Research limitations/implications

The sample consists of 172 valid responses from companies in Brazil acting in various sectors and thus does not allow the determination of citizenship maturity in selected sectors.

Practical implications

The research points to a gap regarding understanding and practice in corporate citizenship in Brazil. To foster evolution of corporate citizenship, Brazilian companies are advised to work especially on leadership engagement, organizational structures, issue management, stakeholder relationships and transparency.

Originality/value

This is the first study about the maturity of corporate citizenship in Brazilian companies.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Gillian MacIntyre, Nicola Ann Cogan, Ailsa Elizabeth Stewart, Neil Quinn, Michael Rowe and Maria O’Connell

People with lived experience of mental health problems (MHPs) are often marginalised and have difficulty achieving community inclusion. Citizenship, a relatively novel…

Abstract

Purpose

People with lived experience of mental health problems (MHPs) are often marginalised and have difficulty achieving community inclusion. Citizenship, a relatively novel concept in mental health, provides a means of understanding what is necessary for marginalised individuals and groups to gain a sense of belonging within their communities. By exploring the “what, why, how and who” of citizenship, the purpose of this paper is to provide a rationale for the inclusion of citizenship as part of a person-centred and holistic mental health strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, with peer researchers, was adopted to develop a model of citizenship within a Scottish context. The aim of the model is to link the concept of citizenship with specific strategies that systems, agencies and individuals can use within mental health policy and practice to promote greater inclusion and participation. Concept mapping was used as part of a mixed-methods participatory methodology and data were then analysed using multivariate statistical methods of multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis.

Findings

It is argued that using a CBPR approach, utilising concept mapping, encourages the development of a model of citizenship that is entirely grounded in the perspectives and lived experiences of people with MHPs. The need for adequate resources, preparatory work, training, research management and reflexive practice are key to the success of a CBPR approach with peer researchers.

Originality/value

Working with peer researchers and key stakeholder groups is central to a CBPR approach and the implementation of a model of citizenship within mental health policy and practice. Developing a model of citizenship derived specifically from the experiences of people with lived experience is likely to promote their inclusion. It provides a means of challenging the structural deficits and inequalities that cause distress and prevent people with lived experience of MHPs of recovering their citizenship.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Anna Broka and Anu Toots

The authors’ aim is to establish the variance of youth welfare citizenship regimes in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and to revisit the applicability of the regime…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors’ aim is to establish the variance of youth welfare citizenship regimes in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and to revisit the applicability of the regime approach to the emerging welfare regimes (EWRs).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis follows the descriptive case study strategy aiming to discover diversity of youth welfare citizenship patterns. The case selection is made within the CEE country group, which includes countries in Central Europe, the Baltics, Eastern Europe and Southeast Europe, all sharing the communist past. The subdivision of these countries in reference to the welfare states can be made via the European Union (EU) membership based on the assumption that EU social policy frameworks and recommendations have an important effect on domestic policies. We included countries which are in the EU, i.e., with a similar political and economic transition path. There were three waves of accession to the EU in CEE countries. In the first wave (2004), all the Baltic countries, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary and Slovenia joined. In the second wave (2007), Romania and Bulgaria joined. Finally, Croatia joined the EU in 2013. Altogether 11 CEE countries are the EU members today, the remaining CEE countries are non-EU members and thus are excluded from the current research. Those countries which are part of the EU share similarities in social and economic reforms during the pre-accession period and after in order to reach a comparatively similar system with other member states. So, in terms of casing strategy these six countries can be named as emerging welfare regimes (EWRs) evolving transformations across different public policy areas. Handpicking of six countries out of 11 relies on the assumption that the Anglo-Saxon welfare system characteristics are more evident in the Baltic countries (Aidukaite, 2019; Aidukaite et al., 2020; Ainsaar et al., 2020; Rajevska and Rajevska, 2020) and Slovenia, while in Bulgaria and Croatia certain outcomes reflect the Bismarckian principles of social security (Hrast and Rakar, 2020; Stoilova and Krasteva, 2020; Dobrotić, 2020). This brings important variety into our analysis logic. Last but not least, we juxtapose six CEE EWR countries under analysis with six mature welfare regime countries representing different welfare regime types. Those mature welfare regime countries (Finland, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy, UK) are not an explicit object of the study but help to put analysed CEE EWR cases into larger context and thus, reflect upon theoretical claims of the welfare regime literature.

Findings

The authors can confirm that the EWR countries can be rather well explained by the welfare citizenship typology and complement the existing knowledge on youth welfare regime typology clusters in the Western Europe. Estonia is clustered close to the Nordic countries, whereas Latvia, Lithuania, Croatia and Slovenia are close to the Bismarckian welfare model despite rather flexible, non-restricted educational path, universal child and student support. Bulgaria is an outlier; however, it is clustered together with mature Mediterranean welfare regimes. Former intact welfare regime clusters are becoming more diverse. The authors’ findings confirm that there is no any intact cluster of the “post-communist” welfare regime and Eastern European countries are today “on move”.

Research limitations/implications

Altogether 11 CEE countries are the EU members today. The remaining CEE countries are non-EU members and thus are excluded from the current research. Those countries which are part of the EU share similarities in social and economic reforms during the pre-accession period and after in order to reach a comparatively similar system with other member states. At least one CEE country was chosen based on existing theoretical knowledge on the welfare regime typology (Anglo Saxon, Beveridgean, Bismarckian) for the Post-communist country groups.

Practical implications

In the social citizenship dimension we dropped social assistance schemes and tax-relief indices and included poverty risk and housing measures. Youth poverty together with housing showed rather clear distinction between familialized and individualised countries and thus, made the typology stronger. In the economic dimension the preliminary picture was much fuzzier, mainly due to the comprehensive education in the region and intervention of the EU in domestic ALMPs (and VET) reforms. The authors added a new indicator (pro-youth orientation of ALMP) in order better to capture youth-sensitivity of policy.

Social implications

The authors included a working poverty measure (in-work poverty rate) in order to reflect labour market insecurity as an increasing concern. Yet, the analysis results were still mixed and new indicators did not help locating the regime types.

Originality/value

In order to improve the validity of the youth welfare citizenship regime economic dimension, Chevalier's (2020) model may also be worth revisiting. The authors argue that this dichotomy is not sufficient, because inclusive type can have orientation towards general skills or occupational skills (i.e. monitored or enabling citizenship clusters), which is currently ignored. Chevalier (2020) furthermore associates inclusive economic citizenship with “coordinated market economies” (referring to Hall and Soskice, 2001), which seems hardly hold validity in the Nordic and at least some CEE countries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Andrea Christoff

This case study illustrates how one social studies teacher used the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP)' s framework and philosophy to teach for…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study illustrates how one social studies teacher used the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP)' s framework and philosophy to teach for global citizenship. The research question that framed this study was: How is an IB MYP Individuals and Societies (I&S) teacher enacting their perceptions and understanding of global citizenship education? Findings illustrate that this teacher enacted a proactive pedagogy, using her own personal perceptions and what IB MYP offered her through their affective and cognitive frameworks to apply her conceptions of global citizenship education.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this single case study came from teacher semi-structured interviews (Rubin and Rubin, 2012), observations, field notes (Merriam and Tisdell, 2016) and teacher created documents. The goal for the teacher created documents was to provide detail, depth and evidence to support or contrast with what was found in the interviews and observations. Simultaneous, in vivo, and values coding were used to analyze the data and to get an overall picture of what the participant said, believed and practiced. Theories surrounding global citizenship education provided the lens for the study.

Findings

The findings are organized according to (1) the way this teacher's developed constructions of global citizenship and global citizenship education and IB led her to use the IB philosophy and framework to shape her beliefs and practices and (2) the way she embraced the tensions and possibilities inherent in her teaching for global citizenship in an IB MYP classroom to teach a proactive form of global citizenship education.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides insight into the curriculum framework of IB MYP and the curriculum and instruction decisions of an I&S teacher. For the global citizenship education field, this study provides an example of how global citizenship can be incorporated into a social studies classroom.

Practical implications

For social studies education, this study uncovered the possibilities present in the curriculum when a teacher is given the space to make their own instructional decisions. This study also gives guidance on how international curriculum frameworks can be utilized for global citizenship education. Finally, this study illustrates teachers must fully subscribe to IB and the MYP as a means of teaching for global citizenship for it to be beneficial.

Originality/value

This study has value because it highlights how a social studies teacher successfully uses an international curriculum framework to teach for global citizenship. Few studies have shown examples of teachers, especially IB MYP teachers, who are committed to teaching for global citizenship and use the tools they are given to center student choice and connect the content to their students' lives. Teachers and researchers will be able to view the pedagogical possibilities inherent in this teacher's global citizenship methods.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Prince Ewudzie Quansah, Yongyue Zhu and Anthony Frank Obeng

This paper aims to investigate the effect of mining supervisor behaviour, safety motivation and perceived job insecurity on Ghanaian underground miner’s safety citizenship

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of mining supervisor behaviour, safety motivation and perceived job insecurity on Ghanaian underground miner’s safety citizenship behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors proposed a conceptual framework that tested supervisor behaviour as an independent variable, safety motivation as a mediator variable, perceived job insecurity as a moderator variable and safety citizenship behaviour as a dependent variable. The authors tested the hypothesized relationships using 351 valid responses collected through a structured questionnaire using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results revealed that both components of supervisor behaviour significantly influenced safety motivation and safety citizenship behaviour. Furthermore, safety motivation could mediate the relationships between both components of supervisor behaviour and safety citizenship behaviour. Also, perceived job insecurity failed to moderate the relationship between safety motivation and safety citizenship behaviour.

Originality/value

This current study is vital for managerial practices. The complex conceptual framework also contributes to offering different ways of understanding how supervisors’ behaviours can catalyze improvement or worsen safety outcomes.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Erin Ice

While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) promised to reduce inequalities in insurance coverage between Latinos and non-Latinos by expanding coverage, it also excluded a large…

Abstract

While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) promised to reduce inequalities in insurance coverage between Latinos and non-Latinos by expanding coverage, it also excluded a large portion of noncitizen immigrants. Past research has demonstrated that among Latinos, further inequalities have developed between citizens and noncitizens after the ACA took effect, but it is unclear if this pattern is unique to Latinos or is evident among non-Latinos as well. I use data from the 2011 to 2016 waves of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (n = 369,386) to test how the relationship between citizenship status (native citizen, naturalized citizen, or noncitizen) and insurance coverage changed after the ACA, adjusting for health, demographic, and socioeconomic factors. I disaggregate the analysis by ethnicity to test whether this change differs between Latinos and non-Latinos. The analysis finds that after the ACA, naturalized citizens across ethnic groups moved toward parity with native citizens in health insurance coverage while the benefits of the ACA for noncitizens were conditional on ethnicity. For non-Latinos, lacking citizenship became less disadvantageous for predicting insurance coverage while for Latinos, lacking citizenship became even more disadvantageous in predicting insurance coverage. This bifurcation among noncitizens by ethnicity implies that while the ACA has strengthened institutional boundaries between citizens and noncitizens, this distinction is primarily affecting Latinos. The conclusion offers considerations on how legal systems of stratification influence population health processes.

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