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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Irina Tsvetkova, Evgenia Zhelnina, Tatiana Ivanova and Natalia Gorbacheva

The chapter is devoted to analysis of the structure of regional identity. Topicality of this issue is caused by the processes of social differentiation of regions. The…

Abstract

The chapter is devoted to analysis of the structure of regional identity. Topicality of this issue is caused by the processes of social differentiation of regions. The purpose of the research is to describe the factors of regional identity. Regional identity is predetermined by natural, geographical, socio-cultural, ethnic, and socio-political factors. Regional identity is viewed as a complex dynamic structure. It is analyzed on the basis of application of concepts of constructivism and symbolic capital. The authors come to the conclusion that dynamics of regional identity are determined by individuals’ evaluation of the conditions of the territory for satisfying the needs and implementation of life plans. This aspect is analyzed from the positions of the concept of constructivism. It is also concluded that dynamics of regional identity depends on attractive image of the territory and realization of its uniqueness. This aspect of regional identity is viewed as a symbolic capital, which stimulates the development of territory.

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Andrew Stow

Cultural dimensions studies can limit managers' ability to overcome challenges within international teams as they perpetuate stereotypical perceptions based on…

Abstract

Cultural dimensions studies can limit managers' ability to overcome challenges within international teams as they perpetuate stereotypical perceptions based on nationality. Instead, managers can use identity theory to build a team culture based on interpersonal awareness in which team members view their colleagues as fully realized and predictable individuals.

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Chenchen Li, Ling Eleanor Zhang and Anne-Wil Harzing

In response to the somewhat paradoxical combination of increasing diversity in the global workforce and the resurgence of nationalism in an era of global mobility, this…

Abstract

In response to the somewhat paradoxical combination of increasing diversity in the global workforce and the resurgence of nationalism in an era of global mobility, this chapter aims to uncover how employees on international assignments respond to exposure to new cultures. Specifically, the study aims to explicate the underlying psychological mechanisms linking expatriates' monocultural, multicultural, global, and cosmopolitan identity negotiation strategies with their responses toward the host culture by drawing upon exclusionary and integrative reactions theory in cross-cultural psychology. This conceptual chapter draws on the perspective of exclusionary versus integrative reactions toward foreign cultures – a perspective rooted in cross-cultural psychology research – to categorize expatriates' responses toward the host culture. More specifically, the study elaborates how two primary activators of expatriates' responses toward the host culture – the salience of home-culture identity and a cultural learning mindset – explain the relationship between cultural identity negotiation strategies and expatriates' exclusionary and integrative responses. The following metaphors for these different types of cultural identity negotiation strategies are introduced: “ostrich” (monocultural strategy), “frog” (multicultural strategy), “bird” (global strategy), and “lizard” (cosmopolitan strategy). The proposed dynamic framework of cultural identity negotiation strategies illustrates the sophisticated nature of expatriates' responses to new cultures. This chapter also emphasizes that cross-cultural training tempering expatriates' exclusionary reactions and encouraging integrative reactions is crucial for more effective expatriation in a multicultural work environment.

Details

Intercultural Management in Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-827-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Emilia Karpinskaia

High-tech start-up creation is associated with complex challenges originating from quick transformations in technologies and markets. To raise start-up survival and…

Abstract

Purpose

High-tech start-up creation is associated with complex challenges originating from quick transformations in technologies and markets. To raise start-up survival and success chances, founders need to ensure a rapid conversion of a venture idea into a working business. This paper aims to explore how identity-related characteristics of founders influence the speed of the start-up creation process.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, a longitudinal multiple-case-study design was selected to identify a vivid flow of decisions and actions taken by high-tech start-ups for analysis in depth. Over 20 months, a series of interviews were organized with founders of six start-ups located in the same business incubator in Russia. Also, a set of additional data sources was engaged, including publicly available data and internal documents provided by businesses.

Findings

The findings reveal contrasting dynamics of start-up creation processes among founders with differing role identities. Identity fit and identity misfit are suggested to be serious pull and push factors in the process of organizational becoming through the impact they have on the situational regulatory focus of founders.

Originality/value

The current research contributes to the entrepreneurship stream of research by extending the knowledge of how cognition affects the process of new venture creation.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Fernando Antonio Ribeiro Serra, Marcos Rogério Mazieri, Isabel Cristina Scafuto, June Alisson Westarb Cruz and Fabio Pinoti

Mission statements are usually related to strategic management and elements related to the organization's identity. Catholic higher education organizations (CHEOs) identity

Abstract

Purpose

Mission statements are usually related to strategic management and elements related to the organization's identity. Catholic higher education organizations (CHEOs) identity is based on the Charisma of the founder of the Catholic order or congregation. If in contradiction, it puts their organizational legitimacy at risk. If organizations deviate from their identity, it means a mission drift. Even more severe is when mission statements are misaligned with the identity. In this study, the authors seek better understand the mission drift by the misalignment between the mission statement and the organizational identity of the CHEOs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine the mission statements of 112 Catholic CHEOs in Brazil. They used lexical analysis based on descending hierarchical classification and post-factorial analysis. They analyzed the vocabularies of each class extracted from the descending hierarchical classification and determine the presence or absence of the Charisma.

Findings

The results indicate that aspects of Catholic identity through the Charisma are manifested in the organizational mission but are not predominant. There is a variation of the mission statements relative to the Charisma of the orders and congregations. A significant part manifests generically. They respond in a similar and isomorphic way or to internal institutional pressures of CHEOs.

Originality/value

The authors empirically identified a mission drift, considering the mismatch between the mission statement and the Charisma. The authors emphasize that for organizational identity to manifest, it should consider the identity that emerges from the founder's Charisma. This influence must appear in central elements of the organizational identity, such as the mission statements.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Ana Burcharth, Pernille Smith and Lars Frederiksen

This paper investigates how a new entrepreneurial identity forms in conjunction with prior work-related identities during sponsored self-employment after an emotional job loss.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how a new entrepreneurial identity forms in conjunction with prior work-related identities during sponsored self-employment after an emotional job loss.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically examine why some dismissed employees failed and others succeeded in transitioning from a wage-earner career via corporate sponsorship to a career as an entrepreneur, investigating how those employees meaningfully constructed (or did not) an entrepreneurial identity.

Findings

The authors' findings show that the simultaneous preservation of central attributes of prior work-related identities and the engenderment of new entrepreneurial attributes support the formation of an entrepreneurial identity and that a liminal state, in which people practice entrepreneurship at work, may facilitate identity transition.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the initial entrepreneurial endeavor is based on prior work-related identity and identity congruence between prior work-related identities and a projected entrepreneurial identity is of great importance for the identity transition. However, the authors also show that incongruence may in some cases turn into congruence if entrepreneurs are given the opportunity to experiment with provisional entrepreneurial selves in a risk-free environment (so-called liminal states).

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2022

Zulhamri Abdullah, Chinedu Eugenia Anumudu and Syed Hassan Raza

This study aims to examine the current state of mission and vision statements on the company websites of fast-growing Malaysian and Singaporean small- and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the current state of mission and vision statements on the company websites of fast-growing Malaysian and Singaporean small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and analyze how these attributes are functionally used to build a distinct digital organizational identity.

Design/methodology/approach

The content analysis method was used to examine the similarities and differences among 170 Malaysian and Singaporean-selected SMEs based on Aaker’s five brand personality scales.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that there were explicit discrepancies between Malaysian and Singaporean SMEs in the applications of brand personality attributes. The findings also identified an increase in communicating mission and vision statements on the websites of both Malaysian and Singaporean SMEs. This emphasizes the need for Malaysian and Singaporean companies to intensify their efforts to develop a notable digital organizational identity.

Research limitations/implications

This study endeavors to provide novel insights into the digital communication practices of SMEs in building digital organization identity based on brand personality elements. Therefore, this study theoretically advances Aaker’s brand personality framework by incorporating digital organizational identity as a concept of Aaker’s brand personality from the SME perspective. This study contributes to the organizational identity literature by highlighting the need for these SMEs to integrate brand personality dimensions to compete with leading global companies.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that managers of SMEs can develop a unique digital organizational identity by communicating their vision and mission statements on their websites as a strategic asset for sustaining corporate reputation.

Originality/value

To date, little is known about the inevitable adaptation and application of communication that occurs when using digital means to develop a digital organizational identity. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to establish how Asian SMEs communicate their unique brand personality through websites to build their digital organizational identity.

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2022

Ho Jung Choo, Ha Kyung Lee and Jiali Xie

This study aims to investigate the influences of two facets of Vietnamese consumers' cultural identities (i.e. global and national) on their intent to consume Korean…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influences of two facets of Vietnamese consumers' cultural identities (i.e. global and national) on their intent to consume Korean lifestyle products and services via attitudes toward Korea. The difference between generations (Generation Z vs. X) is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through an online survey firm. The participants are Vietnamese consumers residing in Vietnam, varying in age from teens to those in their 50s (n = 500). The collected data are analyzed by SPSS 21.0 for the descriptive statistics, frequency analysis, and reliability analysis. AMOS 21.0 is employed for confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis.

Findings

This study reveals that global identity affects Vietnamese consumers' attitudes toward Korea and their intent to consume Korean lifestyle products and services. Results show that only global identity affects attitudes and behavioral intention toward Korea among generation Xers, while national identity has no effect. For Generation Z (Gen Z), both global and national identities have a positive effect on attitudes toward Korea, which also increases the intent to consume Korean lifestyle products and services.

Practical implications

Measuring individuals' global and national identities will allow brands and retailers to better understand international consumers of various generations and develop global marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study bridges gaps in the literature on globalized consumption in a non-Western context by identifying how consumers in emerging markets become involved in cross-cultural consumption.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2022

Jingxin Lv, Shuang Zhang and Shuang Zhang

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of chief executive officer (CEO) hometown identity on company audit fees in the Chinese setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of chief executive officer (CEO) hometown identity on company audit fees in the Chinese setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data from Chinese public companies in the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange for the period 2008–2019. This study investigates the impact path of CEO hometown identity on company audit fees and further examines the moderating role of internal and external governance level.

Findings

This study finds that CEO hometown identity is significantly and negatively related to company audit fees. In addition, CEO hometown identity can reduce audit fees by alleviating agency risk and litigation risk. Moreover, the negative effect of CEO hometown identity on audit fees is more pronounced in companies with a higher percentage of institutional investors shareholding and more analysts tracking quantity.

Practical implications

This study may provide new references for executives’ selection, auditors’ optimization decisions and regulators’ information disclosure system.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by exploring the effect of CEO hometown identity on audit fees in the context of China.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Kirsi Peura and Ulla Hytti

This paper investigates how academic teachers engage in identity work and make sense of entrepreneurship and academia in an entrepreneurship training programme.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how academic teachers engage in identity work and make sense of entrepreneurship and academia in an entrepreneurship training programme.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing a sensemaking approach, the paper inductively analyses materials from a business idea development camp organised for academic teachers.

Findings

In collective sensemaking during the camp, non-academic facilitators strongly influenced the reflection-in-experience via normative ideas of entrepreneurship and their othering of entrepreneurship from academic work. In their post-camp individual essays, the academic teachers reflect-on-experience and draw parallels between entrepreneurship and academic work constructing sameness.

Research limitations/implications

Longitudinal research is needed in identity work and sensemaking among academic teachers in relation to entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Universities need to offer arenas for teachers and other faculty to support identity work and sensemaking.

Originality/value

This study generates new understanding of how academic teachers engage in identity work and make sense of entrepreneurship in training when interacting with others. It underscores the importance of time needed for reflection-on-action.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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