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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

S.S. Nupo, C.R.B. Oguntona, O.O. Onabanjo and E.O. Fakoya

The aim of the study is to assess the dietary diversity score (DDS) and nutritional status of women in the University of Agriculture extension village in rural areas of Ogun…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to assess the dietary diversity score (DDS) and nutritional status of women in the University of Agriculture extension village in rural areas of Ogun State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative sample of 204 women was surveyed from the rural villages in two seasons using simple random technique. A pretested interview guide was used to collect information on personal data, and socio demographic characteristics of the subjects. Information on dietary diversity was obtained using Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project questionnaire (FANTA). Body mass index (BMI), waist‐hip ratio (WHR) and skin fold thickness were used in classifying obesity. Information on food intake was obtained from 24‐hour dietary recall techniques. For each season, a DDS was computed and the nutritional status was assessed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics; SPSS software package version 16.0.

Findings

The socio economic characteristic revealed that more than half (53 percent) had no formal education, 59 percent were small scale farmers. The DDS increased from 3.55±7.6 to 3.93±4.3 between the two seasons. DDS within the various food groups showed that fruit group increased from 0.48±0.20 to 0.52.±0.10, vegetable group 0.60±0.30 to 0.66±0.30, and meat group 0.48±0.20 to 0.58±0.30 while cereals/grain groups and oil/dairies group decreased from 0.42±0.30 to 0.37, 0.11±0.30 to 0.09, respectively, between the two seasons. The nutrient content of the subjects was calculated from nutrient contents of foods obtained from food composition tables and compared to dietary reference intake (DRI). The results showed that the protein, energy and fat intakes of the subjects increased significantly during the rainy season (p<0.05). Two percent of the subjects gained weight, 4 percent had weight reduction from overweight and obese category. The result of the waist‐hip ratio showed that 78 percent had normal waist‐hip ratio, 14 percent had overweight, and 7 percent were obese. The dietary diversity score of the subjects was low. There is need for nutritional education in the villages.

Originality/value

This may be the first research work to assess the dietary diversity score of rural women in Nigeria.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Faizal Adams, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa and Edwin Coleman

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage sampling technique was used to collect data from 100 tomato farmers in Ghana. Analytical tools which include descriptive statistics, gross margin analysis (GM), profitability ratios and binary logit model were employed.

Findings

Profitability analysis indicates that farmers who supply to wholesalers have gross margin of Gh¢7.86 (US$1.67) per 25 kg crate, while farmers who supply to retailers recorded a major loss of Gh¢5.36 (US$1.14) per 25 kg crate. The result suggests that farmers selling to wholesalers are better off than farmers supplying to retailers. The binary logit regression analysis reveals a positive relationship between farmers' choice of marketing outlet (wholesaling) and age of respondents, quantity of tomato sold and cost of labor for production. A negative relationship also existed between farmers' choice of marketing outlet and weighted average selling price and household size.

Research limitations/implications

The results call for policy efforts to provide an enabling environment for more extension education and establishment of farmer associations to make marketing information for price development among farmers available.

Originality/value

The choice of marketing outlet greatly influences profitability of tomato production. This study examines the performance of the various tomato marketing outlets in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Ronald Benard, Frankwell Dulle and Hieromin Lamtane

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods. It involved 240 fish farmers who were randomly selected. Questionnaires, focus group discussions (FGDs), observation and key informant’s interviews were used as methods of data collection. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, while content analysis was used for qualitative data.

Findings

It was found that the most frequently used ICTs by fish farmers in sharing agricultural information were mobile phones, radio and television. Also, the study revealed that major challenges facing fish farmers in sharing information include unfavourable radio or television broadcasting time, high cost of acquiring and maintenance of ICT facilities, lack of training on ICT, poor network connectivity and low level of literacy. Moreover, it was further found that there was negative significant relationship (P < 0.05) between challenges associated with the use and degree of ICT usage by fish farmers.

Originality/value

The study is original with the exception of areas where citations have been made. Besides, it provides awareness and understanding of the challenges facing fish farmers in ICT usage in information sharing on fish farming, and this will enable improvement of timely provision and access to relevant information and hence improved fish farming production.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Ronald Benard, Frankwell W. Dulle and Lamtane A. Hieromin

The purpose of this paper is to assess the information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the Southern high lands of Tanzania.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the Southern high lands of Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data from 240 fish farmers in six selected districts from three regions in Southern high lands of Tanzania. Focus groups and key informants’ interviews were also used to collect qualitative data from 54 fish farmers in the selected districts.

Findings

Findings indicated that fish farmers highly needed information related to water treatment (management), spawning operations and fish preservation and processing. However, it was found that access to these categories of information was very low. In addition, findings indicated that age, education and income have a statistical significant and positive relationship with farmer’s information accessibility at p < 0.05. On the other hand, age, amount of fish harvested, education and farming experience had statistical significant and negative relationship with farmer’s information at p < 0.05.

Originality/value

The study provides a deep understanding of information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the in Southern high lands of Tanzania, which will be assisting in in designing focused, need-based and user-oriented information infrastructure in fish farming.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 67 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2010

Helen Prytherch and Kaspar Wyss

Switzerland faces an HIV epidemic that is concentrated among certain groups, including migrants from high‐prevalence countries. This study explores the HIV/AIDS knowledge of…

Abstract

Switzerland faces an HIV epidemic that is concentrated among certain groups, including migrants from high‐prevalence countries. This study explores the HIV/AIDS knowledge of professionals providing asylum and integration services at cantonal level, with a view to optimising the role they can play in HIV prevention. Data was collected by means of a self‐administered questionnaire; 266 of the 368 professionals (72%) approached responded. Answers were analysed with regard to the respondent's sex, age, workplace and geographical location. General HIV/AIDS knowledge is sound, although there are deficits regarding the vulnerability of migrants. Staff working for non‐governmental organisations are significantly more likely (39%) to attach high importance to HIV/AIDS than civil servants (25%). They are also significantly more likely to have undergone training in HIV/AIDS (25% compared with 15%). Respondents from the German parts of Switzerland are significantly more likely (75%) than those from Romandie and Tessin (48%) to feel sufficiently well informed to be able to address the HIV/AIDS needs of migrants.Professionals providing asylum and integration services could be familiarised more systematically with HIV/AIDS policy documents and with the HIV/AIDS projects and materials in place for migrants. There is also scope to institutionalise targeted training and knowledge management opportunities better.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Pride Anya Ebile, Hycenth Tim Ndah and Jens Norbert Wünsche

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score (DDS)of…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited data are available in facilitating nutritional interventions in developing countries. The objective of this study is to assess the mean dietary diversity score (DDS)of Mbororo minority women in the Northwest region of Cameroon.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the random sampling technique within the Mbororo minority communities (Adorates). A questionnaire on dietary diversity, including 461 Mbororo women, provided information on food consumed using the 24-h dietary recall method.

Findings

Various socio-cultural and economic characteristics of the Mbororo women affected the nutrient level of their diet. Moreover, starchy staples, vitamin-A rich vegetables and palm oil and milk and milk products were consumed by more than half of the Mbororo community. Family herd size showed a positive influence on the dietary habit of the Mbororo population. The mean DDS significantly increased (p = 0.001), as herd size increased from below 50 (3.9 ± 1.1) to above 100 (4.8 ± 1.2).

Practical implications

Most of the diet consumed by the Mbororo women were low in iron, making them susceptible to nutrition anemia. The diet of the Aku women was more deficient in micronutrients than their Jaafun counterpart. These results indicate suitable areas of intervention for any nutrition program that targets the Mbororo minority group of Northwest Cameron.

Social implications

DDS can be used in assessing and classifying the population in rural communities according to the deficiencies in micronutrients of their diet.

Originality/value

The use of DDS to assess the nutrient quality of diets is frequently used to evaluate the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies but has never been applied to Mbororo minority women.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2023

Ogochukwu Gabriella Onah, Ogwu Chris Attah, Umaru Isaac Ibrahim, Chiebonam Chukwuemeka Onyia, Esther Rita Gever, Peter N. Nwokolo and Verlumun Celestine Gever

The aim of this study was to determine the impact of oral communication in improving the marketing and financial management skills of sweet potato farmers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to determine the impact of oral communication in improving the marketing and financial management skills of sweet potato farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quasi-experimental design with a pre- and post-test approach. The sample was 540 sweet potato farmers that were randomly assigned to training (n = 270) and no-training groups (n = 270) with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) as the method of data analysis. While the training group received oral training sessions for three farming seasons beginning in 2019, 2020 and 2021, the no-training group did not receive any intervention.

Findings

Before the training sessions, all the sweet potato farmers scored low on marketing skills like advertising, sales promotion and sales forecasting. Both groups also scored low on financial management skills like budgeting, investments, saving and controlling expenditures. Their annual income level was also low and both groups did not significantly differ. However, after the training and during the follow-up evaluation, the participants in the training group reported a significant improvement in their marketing skills and financial management skills. There was also an improvement in their income level from $238 (N109,480) at baseline to $523 (N240,580) after the training and $782 (N359,720) after the follow-up evaluation. On the other hand, the no-training group reported a staggered fluctuation in their income of $241 (N110,860) at baseline, $371(N170,660) during post-training evaluation and $214 (N98,440) at follow-up assessment.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation is that the study examined only one crop. There is a need to pay attention to farmers of other crops for better understanding. Another limitation of the study is that the researchers examined only oral communication. There is a need to compare more than one training to understand which is more effective. Finally, the current study did not consider the moderating effect of other factors like the source of labour and expenses.

Originality/value

This study has shown that oral communication is an effective tool for promoting the acquisition of marketing and financial management skills and enhancing agribusiness.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2022

Mohamed Ahmed Abobakr, Magdy Abdel-Kader and Ahmed Fouad Elbayoumi

This paper aims to investigate the impact of integrating Sustainable Enterprise Resource Planning (S-ERP) systems and lean manufacturing (LM) practices on sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of integrating Sustainable Enterprise Resource Planning (S-ERP) systems and lean manufacturing (LM) practices on sustainability performance, especially in Egypt as an emerging country.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out an experimental study with a sample of 144 professional accountants of MPA, MBA and DBA students at two of the top universities in Egypt.

Findings

The results provide significant evidence that the integration of S-ERP systems and LM practices implementation improve sustainability performance. However, there is no significant evidence that S-ERP adoption contributes to the success of LM practices implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, this study is limited to use of a laboratory experiment design. Empirical evidence based on quasi experiments on a field setting would add value to the current literature.

Practical implications

Findings provide practical insights for the manufacturing sector managers into the benefits of integrating S-ERP systems and LM practices for sustainability performance improvement (e.g. reducing cost and waste, increasing operational efficiency). For ERP vendors, findings highlight how ERP vendors introduce “enablers” that incorporate LM best practices into their ERP systems and also how those vendors conform to the software sustainability criteria in the design of ERP applications.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous studies that addressed the individual impact of S-ERP systems and LM practices on performance, this paper experimentally gives an indication of the impact of concurrent implementation of S-ERP and LM practices on sustainability performance, especially in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Faisal Alnori, Abdullah Bugshan and Walid Bakry

The purpose of this study is to investigate the difference between the determinants of cash holdings of Shariah-compliant and non-Shariah-compliant firms, for non-financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the difference between the determinants of cash holdings of Shariah-compliant and non-Shariah-compliant firms, for non-financial corporations in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

Design/methodology/approach

The data include all non-financial firms listed in six GCC markets over a period 2005–2019. The IdealRatings database is used to identify Shariah-compliant firms in the GCC. To examine the determinants of cash holdings, a static model is used. To confirm the applicability of the method applied, the Breusch–Pagan Lagrange Multiplier (LM) and Hausman (1978) are used to choose the most efficient and consistent static panel regression.

Findings

The results show that, for Shariah-compliant firms, the relevant determinants of cash holdings are leverage, profitability, capital expenditure, net working capital and operating cash flow. For non-Shariah-compliant firms, the only relevant determinants of cash holdings are leverage, net working capital and operating cash flow. The findings suggest that the cash holding decisions of Shariah-compliant firms can be best explained using the pecking order theory. This reveals that Shariah-compliant firms use liquid assets as their first financing option, due to the Shariah regulations.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies may investigate the optimal levels of cash holdings and compare the adjustment speeds toward target cash holdings of both the Shariah-compliant firms and their conventional counterparts.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the difference between the determinants of cash holdings of Shariah-compliant and non-Shariah-compliant firms.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Rabiu Saminu Jibril, Muhammad Aminu Isa and Zaharaddeen Salisu Maigoshi

The study aims to evaluate the impact of corporate board gender on the energy disclosure with moderating effect of institutional strength (global competitiveness index) by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to evaluate the impact of corporate board gender on the energy disclosure with moderating effect of institutional strength (global competitiveness index) by the listed firms in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a sample of 49 non-financial firms listed on the floor of the Nigerian stock exchange commission for the period of five years (2016–2020). The study uses content analysis techniques to obtain data on environmental disclosure through the use of Global Reporting Initiative standards from the sampled firms. Random and fixed effect regression analyses were run for both direct and moderation models. Based on the results of the Hausman tests, random results were adopted and used in examining the relationship among research variables.

Findings

The study revealed average energy disclosure by the sampled firms. The overall results of the regression analysis found that board gender diversity is significantly related to energy disclosure. The institutional strength moderation result was found to have an insignificant impact on the relationship between board gender and energy disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The study is constrained by not considering all environmentally sensitive firms in the country. Furthermore, the study considered only gender among numerous important board attributes. Hence, other important board attributes should be assessed for better energy disclosure. Future studies should consider data from all sensitive firms and other board attributes.

Practical implications

Recently, the Nigerian Government mandates all firms to comply with environmental disclosure in Nigeria, this should be used as a way forward to encourage and compel all listed firms to improve their energy disclosure.

Social implications

With diverse and vibrant women on boards, firms would benefit and gain legitimacy across demographic, ethnic and religious groups in the society. Hence, corporate bodies can effectively contribute toward enhancing the social welfare of various segments of society.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that provides empirical evidence on the effect of board gender attributes on the energy disclosure using institutional strength as a moderator in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

1 – 10 of 32