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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Ronald Benard, Frankwell W. Dulle and Lamtane A. Hieromin

The purpose of this paper is to assess the information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the Southern high lands of Tanzania.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the Southern high lands of Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data from 240 fish farmers in six selected districts from three regions in Southern high lands of Tanzania. Focus groups and key informants’ interviews were also used to collect qualitative data from 54 fish farmers in the selected districts.

Findings

Findings indicated that fish farmers highly needed information related to water treatment (management), spawning operations and fish preservation and processing. However, it was found that access to these categories of information was very low. In addition, findings indicated that age, education and income have a statistical significant and positive relationship with farmer’s information accessibility at p < 0.05. On the other hand, age, amount of fish harvested, education and farming experience had statistical significant and negative relationship with farmer’s information at p < 0.05.

Originality/value

The study provides a deep understanding of information needs and accessibility for fish farmers in the in Southern high lands of Tanzania, which will be assisting in in designing focused, need-based and user-oriented information infrastructure in fish farming.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 67 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2009

Pirjo Honkanen and Svein Ottar Olsen

The primary purpose of this study is to investigate whether welfare issues are important to consumers also relating to fish. Second, it aims to identify segments based on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this study is to investigate whether welfare issues are important to consumers also relating to fish. Second, it aims to identify segments based on animal and fish welfare issues, environmental concerns and ambivalence about farmed fish.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was designed to investigate consumers' concern for environmental and animal and fish welfare issues together with variables used in profiling segments in the study. The measurement scales used here are adapted from validated scales in previous studies. The survey was conducted in Valencia, Spain, among 450 randomly‐chosen respondents.

Findings

Animal welfare issues related to farmed fish do not seem to be important for the consumers in Valencia. There are, however, differences among the consumers relating to general environmental and animal welfare concern, and ambivalence. Three segments were identified: the unconcerned (27 per cent), the wild fish concerned (34.5 per cent) and the ambivalent (38.5 per cent). Attitudes toward farmed fish, the importance of natural food and social class were most important in profiling differences between clusters.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that the animal welfare issue has not yet become a barrier for farmed fish in Valencia. The results may help fishfarming companies to find their target group among the consumers, based on environmental and animal welfare issues. The results also indicate that there are consumers who are somewhat ambivalent about farmed fish. For this group, more information and knowledge can change their attitudes so they become more positive toward farmed fish in the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information for fishfarming companies or the authorities planning healthy‐eating campaigns targeting fish.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Ronald Benard, Frankwell Dulle and Hieromin Lamtane

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods. It involved 240 fish farmers who were randomly selected. Questionnaires, focus group discussions (FGDs), observation and key informant’s interviews were used as methods of data collection. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, while content analysis was used for qualitative data.

Findings

It was found that the most frequently used ICTs by fish farmers in sharing agricultural information were mobile phones, radio and television. Also, the study revealed that major challenges facing fish farmers in sharing information include unfavourable radio or television broadcasting time, high cost of acquiring and maintenance of ICT facilities, lack of training on ICT, poor network connectivity and low level of literacy. Moreover, it was further found that there was negative significant relationship (P < 0.05) between challenges associated with the use and degree of ICT usage by fish farmers.

Originality/value

The study is original with the exception of areas where citations have been made. Besides, it provides awareness and understanding of the challenges facing fish farmers in ICT usage in information sharing on fish farming, and this will enable improvement of timely provision and access to relevant information and hence improved fish farming production.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Anne Katrin Schlag and Kaja Ystgaard

Fish is considered a healthy and pure food. However, modern aquaculture introduced a range of potentially controversial issues, which may impact public perceptions. The…

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1452

Abstract

Purpose

Fish is considered a healthy and pure food. However, modern aquaculture introduced a range of potentially controversial issues, which may impact public perceptions. The purpose of this paper is to compare consumer perceptions of the production and consumption of wild and farmed fish in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 28 focus groups were conducted in the capitals of seven European countries: France, Italy, Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain and the UK, between January‐March 2009. Data were analyzed with the qualitative software Atlas/ti.

Findings

Focus group discussions centre on a broad range of themes: economic risks and benefits, environmental concerns, human health issues, trust and nature. Europeans weigh up the scientific risks and benefits of farmed versus wild fish. However, when considering non‐scientific concerns, such as trust and nature, consumers prefer wild to farmed fish. Respondents have less trust in the production and consumption of farmed fish than in their wild counterparts, as the former are perceived as unnatural and unfamiliar.

Originality/value

Results have implications for the development of public communication strategies. The predicted growth of aquaculture highlights the importance of communicating the risks and benefits of farmed fish and fish farming effectively. The authors' findings show that a communication needs to incorporate moral and ethical risk dimensions, as these are the distinguishing areas leading to consumer preference of wild over farmed fish.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Marina Aferiba Tandoh, Felix Charles Mills-Robertson, Michael David Wilson and Alex Kojo Anderson

The purpose of this study was to elucidate the association between helminth infections, dietary parameters and cognitive performance, as well as the predictors of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to elucidate the association between helminth infections, dietary parameters and cognitive performance, as well as the predictors of undernutrition among school-age children (SAC) living in helminth-endemic fishing and farming communities in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a cross sectional study involving 164 (9 to 12 years old) SAC from fishing (n = 84) and farming (n = 80) communities of the Kwahu Afram Plains South District of the Eastern Region of Ghana, using structured questionnaires and anthropometric and biochemical assessments.

Findings

Overall, 51.2% of the children were males, with no significant gender difference between the communities (p = 0.88). Average age of the children was 10.5 ± 1.25 years, with no significant difference between the farming and fishing communities (p = 0.90). About 53.1% of all children were anemic, with no significant differences between farming versus fishing communities (p = 0.87). Helminth-infected children were significantly anemic (p = 0.03). Mean serum zinc level of all children was 13.1 ± 4.57 µmol/L, with zinc deficiency being significantly higher in children in the farming community (p < 0.0001). About 7.5% of all the children were underweight, whilst 13.8% were stunted with a higher proportion of stunting occurring among older children (p = 0.001) and girls (p = 0.117). There was no significant difference in the Raven’s Colored Progressive Matrices cognitive test scores between the two communities (p = 0.79). Predictors of anemia were helminthiasis and pica behavior.

Originality/value

These findings are relevant and have the prospect of guiding the development of intervention programs in addressing the persistent problem of nutritional and cognitive deficits among SAC.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 24 February 2011

Douglas H. Constance and M. Kirk Jentoft

This chapter combines a global value chain methodology with the case of the development of the farmed Atlantic salmon industry in Chile to inform discussions regarding the…

Abstract

This chapter combines a global value chain methodology with the case of the development of the farmed Atlantic salmon industry in Chile to inform discussions regarding the globalization of economy and society. The research documents the shifting structure of the value chain from the north to the south as Chile replaced northern Europe as the locus of production and the major world supplier of farmed Atlantic salmon. Farmed salmon was supported by the Chilean state as part of its export-oriented industrialization model that attracted foreign direct investment (FDI) from northern TNCs. Chile's low costs of production combined with growing environmental problems in the north and global retailers' demand for large quantities of low-cost product resulted in the restructuring of the farmed Atlantic-salmon value chain as northern capital sourced the south as a lucrative production platform to service northern consumers. A detailed investigation of the rise in dominance of the firm Marine Harvest is provided to illustrate the process of industry concentration the Chilean farmed-salmon industry. This model has generated a legitimation crisis related to environmental degradation and labor abuses resulting in social movement organization both nationally and internationally. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of the Wal-Mart Effect on the agrifood industry in particular and in the farmed-salmon industry in particular.

Details

Globalization and the Time–Space Reorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-318-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Kristian Ellingsen, Kristine Grimsrud, Hanne Marie Nielsen, Cecilie Mejdell, Ingrid Olesen, Pirjo Honkanen, Ståle Navrud, Christian Gamborg and Peter Sandøe

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to assess how concerned Norwegians are about fish welfare; second, to investigate Norwegians’ willingness to pay for salmon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to assess how concerned Norwegians are about fish welfare; second, to investigate Norwegians’ willingness to pay for salmon filet made from welfare-assured farmed fish with high levels of welfare; and third, to examine Norwegian opinions about the appropriate way to pay for better welfare standards in fish production.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of two focus group sessions, a survey questionnaire was developed and distributed to a representative sample of 2,147 Norwegian households via e-mail.

Findings

Results showed that the Norwegian public is concerned about fish welfare and is willing to pay a price premium for products made from welfare-assured fish. Norwegian consumers do not, however, want to be the only ones paying for fish welfare, as the main responsibility for fish welfare lies with producers and the Government.

Research limitations/implications

In this study willingness to pay is measured using a hypothetical choice experiment. Values people express as citizens, however, may not accurately predict true consumer behaviour. This is generally referred to as “citizen-consumer duality” and may have affected the results.

Practical implications

The study shows that there is a national market for welfare-assured fish products, but education initiatives focusing on fish farming and fish welfare issues would further influence the attitudes and purchasing habits of Norwegian consumers.

Originality/value

Although concern about animal welfare is growing in the western world, very little attention has been given to the welfare of fish. This paper aims to make up for this by presenting a study of how Norwegians view the welfare of farmed salmon.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Hans Stubbe Solgaard and Yingkui Yang

Aquaculture is, an important animal farming activity, and fish welfare has recently become an important issue in the EU. Driving forces behind the promotion of fish

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1863

Abstract

Purpose

Aquaculture is, an important animal farming activity, and fish welfare has recently become an important issue in the EU. Driving forces behind the promotion of fish welfare are demands from retailers and consumers. Given this background, it is the main objective of this paper in a Danish setting to investigate the willingness of consumers to pay for farmed rainbow trout with a quality label certifying good fish welfare. It also aims to describe consumers’ perception and consumption of farmed fish and their beliefs about fish welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

A contingent valuation approach was used to evaluate consumers’ willingness to pay for fish welfare, using an open‐ended elicitation technique. To determine the factors that may influence consumers’ willingness to pay for fish welfare the binomial logit model was used. Data were collected from an online survey of Danish consumers in the spring of 2009, sample size 1,000.

Findings

Of the sample, 48 percent were on average willing to pay 25 percent extra for welfare rainbow trout. Primarily women with a longer education, belonging to higher income households are willing to pay extra, also older consumers are more willing to pay more than younger consumers. Consumers who emphasize eco‐friendly production of welfare fish, freshness, and animal welfare also tend to be willing to pay extra.

Originality/value

While much literature has addressed animal welfare and willingness to pay for it, only a few studies have specifically considered consumers’ perception of fish welfare and their willingness to pay for welfare fish.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Frank Messner, Hagen Koch and Michael Kaltofen

In this chapter it is shown how economic evaluation algorithms of water use can be integrated into a long-term water management model such that surface-water availability…

Abstract

In this chapter it is shown how economic evaluation algorithms of water use can be integrated into a long-term water management model such that surface-water availability and economic evaluation of various levels of water availability to different uses can be modeled simultaneously. This approach makes it possible to include essential features of economic analyses of water use into water resource modeling and thus improves the capability of such models to support decision making in water management. This is especially relevant for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive, which requires economic analyses to be included in the decision process about future water management strategies.

The water management simulation model WBalMo is presented and the integration of economic-evaluation algorithms is demonstrated for the examples of surface-water use for fish farming and for filling open-cast mining pits in order to achieve acceptable water-quality levels in the emerging pit lakes. Results of applying this integrated evaluation approach are shown for different water management scenarios under conditions of global change in the East German Spree and Schwarze Elster river basins, where water scarcity is an urgent issue. Among the lessons which are drawn by the authors one lesson reads that integrating economic evaluation algorithms into a pre-existing model might bring enormous problems. Therefore, such model approaches should be developed together by water engineers and economists in an interdisciplinary endeavor right from the start.

Details

Ecological Economics of Sustainable Watershed Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-507-9

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Iva Jusup, Domagoj Hruška and Dinko Primorac

The aim of the paper is to gain a wide picture of competitive aspect of tuna farming industry, show its impact on the economy and society in Croatia, and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to gain a wide picture of competitive aspect of tuna farming industry, show its impact on the economy and society in Croatia, and to identify possibilities for improvement of current and future industry‐involved companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Research methodology used was desk research using benchmark of relevant published papers and analysis of official statistical data. Based on information gathered, the author developed its own analysis of a current state in the industry.

Findings

The paper provides an overview of tuna farming industry in Croatia, showing place for increasing the production due to stable demand but also the unused demand in domestic market. Still, there are a lot of barriers as a legal regulations, limited space and lack of supporting industries. With the involvement of companies and the country's representative bodies, the industry has potential to develop into stable economic activity.

Social implications

Tuna farming is based on seacoast and thus improves the demographical picture of those, usually sparsely populated areas. Also, it encourages the fishery of small pelagic fish.

Originality/value

The paper analyses tuna farming industry from its economic aspects, providing information and the base for further research of its economic potential and attraction.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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