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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Weng Marc Lim

This paper aims to help challenger marketers identify and target the right customer organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help challenger marketers identify and target the right customer organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a customer organization profiling route to targeting for challenger marketing that is predicated on a thematic analysis of key findings of customer organization profiles from an international case study.

Findings

This paper introduces and explains the concepts of aggressiveness to succeed, compatibility of offerings, openness to new ideas and willingness to take action (or A-C-O-W) as components of a newly developed customer organization profiling matrix for challenger marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The A-C-O-W customer organization profiling matrix offers a fresh conceptual outlook for targeting customer organizations using a challenger marketing approach in the contemporary business-to-business (B2B) marketplace.

Practical implications

The A-C-O-W customer organization profiling matrix illuminates how challenger marketers can target the right customer organizations in the contemporary B2B marketplace.

Originality/value

The A-C-O-W customer organization profiling matrix is a pioneering concept for challenger marketing in B2B theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Gordon Fullerton

Allen and Meyer’s (1990) three component model of organizational commitment is now well accepted in the study of consumer–service provider relationships (Keiningham et al.

Abstract

Purpose

Allen and Meyer’s (1990) three component model of organizational commitment is now well accepted in the study of consumer–service provider relationships (Keiningham et al., 2015). Commitment profiling is a “person-centered approach” to commitment (Meyer et al., 2012) which examines groups of individuals who share similar commitment mindsets. The purpose of this paper is to apply commitment profile methodology to the analysis of customer–firm relationships in the context of financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

This method was applied with customer data collected as part of a nation-wide panel study of consumer financial service relationships in Canada. In total, 428 banking customers participated in this study.

Findings

This study identified five distinct bank customer commitment profiles (fully committed, affective commitment dominant, continuance commitment dominant, moderately committed and uncommitted) that varied in both size and behaviors and intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploration of commitment profiling as a technique to understand the ways in which consumers differ in terms of their commitment mindsets and behavior. It has application to a wide range of service relationships beyond financial services.

Practical implications

This has applications for market segmentation on the basis of customer commitment mindsets in many service sectors, but banking in particular. Since financial institutions have adopted various techniques to measure customer lifetime value (CLV), it would be appropriate to understand how various commitment profiles (segments) are linked to CLV.

Originality/value

While commitment profiling is a well-developed approach in understanding the nature of the firm–employee employment relationships, this is an early and exploratory attempt at applying this method in the context of a customer–financial service provider marketing relationship. This is a novel way of understanding bank customer segments in terms of their felt commitment to the financial institution with which they do business.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Susan Whittle and Morris Foster

The authors have constructed a model which breaks down customercontact in consuming a service into six steps: search, arrival,pre‐contact, contact, withdrawal, follow‐up…

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1466

Abstract

The authors have constructed a model which breaks down customer contact in consuming a service into six steps: search, arrival, pre‐contact, contact, withdrawal, follow‐up. They argue that this “journey” should be mapped out by service organisations and the key points carefully managed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Louis de Koker

– This paper aims to investigate the purpose, reach and effectiveness of the customer identification framework of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the purpose, reach and effectiveness of the customer identification framework of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

Design/methodology/approach

The article draws on relevant research and documents of the FATF, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and the Alliance for Financial Inclusion to determine whether compliance with the standards and practices of the FATF would prevent anonymous usage of financial services.

Findings

The FATF’s identification principles, guidance and practices resulted in processes that are largely bureaucratic and do not ensure that identity fraud is effectively prevented. Strict identification requirements on the other hand may impact on financial inclusion, leaving the FATF with little leeway to raise its standards. There are potential solutions, but they are longer-term and partial in nature.

Originality/value

Current identification and verification practices affect the lives of millions of people around the globe. The measures are being enforced to ensure that users are appropriately identified. This article informs the debate by highlighting the weaknesses of the current approach.

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Perry John Forsythe

The study aims to assist contractors in strategically managing customer satisfaction by applying marketing theory to housing construction. It specifically aims to…

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1485

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to assist contractors in strategically managing customer satisfaction by applying marketing theory to housing construction. It specifically aims to investigate service quality as an input to pre‐purchase (pre‐contract) expectations in the made‐to‐order housing construction market.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed from the literature concerning the formulation of expectations during the pre‐purchase decision process. Data from 51 detailed telephone interviews with customers undertaking live housing projects are analysed using both thematic analysis and qualitative comparative analysis.

Findings

A revised model is provided, which includes a dimensionalised set of traits to suit housing construction customers. Strings of traits are then used to develop holistic customer profiles, including situations where service quality is fully present in critical pre‐purchase expectations and where it is totally absent (i.e. price and product design dominate instead).

Practical implications

The model and profiling technique offer a generalisable basis for contractors and others involved in housing delivery to better understand customer expectations, thus making it possible to better manage customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The research contributes to new knowledge by providing a systematic means of understanding customer behaviour at a depth that is not apparent in the current body of literature. Theory is also developed in a way that has practical application, i.e. customer profiles can be used to assist daily marketing and management operations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Lorenzo Ardito, Antonio Messeni Petruzzelli, Umberto Panniello and Achille Claudio Garavelli

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive picture of the innovative efforts undertaken over time to develop the digital technologies for managing the…

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7489

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive picture of the innovative efforts undertaken over time to develop the digital technologies for managing the interface between supply chain management and marketing processes and the role they play in sustaining supply chain management-marketing (SCM-M) integration from an information processing point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

Patent analysis and actual examples are used to carry out this study. In detail, first, the authors identify the subset of enabling technologies pertaining to the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0) that can be considered the most relevant for effective SCM-M integration (i.e. Industrial Internet of Things, Cloud computing, Big Data analytics and customer profiling, Cyber security). Second, the authors carry out a patent analysis aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the patenting activity trends characterizing the set of digital technologies under investigation, hence highlighting their innovation dynamics and applications.

Findings

This research provides insightful information about which digital technologies may enable the SCM-M integration. Specifically, the authors highlight the role those solutions play in terms of information acquisition, storage and elaboration for SCM-M integration by relying on illustrative actual examples. Moreover, the authors present the organisations more involved in the development of digital technologies for SCM-M integration over time and offer an examination of their technological impact in terms of influence on subsequent technological developments.

Originality/value

So far, much has been said about why marketing and supply chain management functions should be integrated. However, a clear picture of the digital technologies that might be adopted to achieve this objective has yet to be revealed. Thus, the paper contributes to the literature on SCM-M integration and Industry 4.0 by highlighting the enabling technologies for the Industry 4.0 that may particularly serve for managing the SCM-M interface from an information processing perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Orsolya Fehér, Attila Gere, Ágnes Csiby, Dorina Szakál and Anna Dunay

Hungarian economy went through substantial changes in the past few decades and hypermarkets gained high popularity among customers, therefore profiling Hungarian…

Abstract

Purpose

Hungarian economy went through substantial changes in the past few decades and hypermarkets gained high popularity among customers, therefore profiling Hungarian hypermarket shoppers is essential to understand their behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the profile of Hungarian hypermarket shoppers based on a wide questionnaire survey. In the presented research, Computer-Aided Personal Interviewing questionnaires were analyzed using multidimensional scaling and k-means clustering.

Findings

Results showed that Hungarian hypermarket shoppers regularly plan their shopping but they buy 8–9 items instead of the planned 4–5 items. However, only 25% of respondents reported the use of shopping list and in spite of the wide digital possibilities, they do not use their mobile devices neither for creating shopping list nor for checking coupons online.

Originality/value

This study explores the profile of Hungarian hypermarket shoppers, which may give additional information for the players of the retail environment about the customers' behavior and preferences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Sergios Dimitriadis

This paper aims to explore benefits customers expect from a long‐term relationship with their bank and the costs associated with such a relationship; it further tests…

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3122

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore benefits customers expect from a long‐term relationship with their bank and the costs associated with such a relationship; it further tests these relational benefits and costs as segmentation variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study based on three focus groups was designed to provide initial input on different types of expected relational benefits and costs. Then, quantitative data were collected from a survey of 209 real bank customers.

Findings

Analysis reveals five types of expected benefits and two types of costs. Four clusters were formed out of these seven expected benefits/costs. These clusters are also different on demographic, behavioral and psychographic variables and present clear and consistent relational profiles.

Research limitations/implications

Scales developed from the focus groups need further validation. Also, findings should be considered as sector and context specific. This work brings additional insight into the nature of expected relational benefits and costs, supports their usefulness for customer segmentation and offers opportunities for studying relational benefits and costs in an integrated way.

Practical implications

Findings provide managers with a better understanding of what customers value in the relationship with their bank and what keeps customers back from having a “close” relationship. Also, relational benefits/costs segmentation is suggested as a powerful tool for targeting and positioning.

Originality/value

The study identifies new types of relational benefits and costs. It is the first time expected relational benefits and costs are studied together and confirmed as meaningful segmentation variables.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jungmi Oh and Susan S. Fiorito

To be a dominant company (in other words, a long‐term successful company), it is an enormous task to build brand loyalty, to reach brand loyal customers, and to give those…

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10013

Abstract

To be a dominant company (in other words, a long‐term successful company), it is an enormous task to build brand loyalty, to reach brand loyal customers, and to give those customers’ product satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to identify clothing brand loyal customers regarding their buying behavior, self‐image, and demographics. Also, brand loyal customers’ post‐purchase outcomes based on clothing attributes were investigated. The questionnaire was based on a self‐administrated pilot study and included measuring brand loyalty, consumer decision making, and demographics. Data were from 328 questionnaires completed by adult women living in Seoul, Korea. The results showed that in purchasing tee shirts, 24.4 percent of the sample were brand loyal customers, 42.2 percent were brand loyal customers in purchasing trousers and 38.7 percent were brand loyal customers in purchasing jackets. The multiple discriminant analysis indicated several significant variables for profiling brand loyal customers and non‐brand loyal customers. High price, brand loyal customers and low/medium price, brand loyal customers significantly differed in post‐purchase satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Sergios Dimitriadis, Athanasios Kouremenos and Nikolaos Kyrezis

Trust has proven to be a key variable in understanding and predicting consumer behavior in the self‐service technology and e‐commerce contexts. However, it has never been…

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4675

Abstract

Purpose

Trust has proven to be a key variable in understanding and predicting consumer behavior in the self‐service technology and e‐commerce contexts. However, it has never been examined as a segmentation variable. This study seeks to investigate the possibility of using trust in two self‐service bank channels: internet, and phone banking, to segment potential users of these channels.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from a survey of 762 real bank customers discriminant analysis is used to test variables differentiating two groups of customers having, respectively, “high” and “low” trust in internet and phone banking.

Findings

Results show that the groups of “high” and “low” channel‐trustors are different in a number of attitudinal, behavioral and psychographic criteria. In addition, the two groups react differently in terms of intention to use internet, and phone banking.

Research limitations/implications

This work contributes to existing literature on trust by opening an additional use of and a new research perspective on trust. Its findings are limited to the sector, technology and cultural context of the study.

Practical implications

In this paper several suggestions for bank managers to better target the adopters of self‐service technology‐based channels are discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to examine trust as a segmentation variable and to bring evidence for its relevance for marketing decisions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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