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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2022

Edem Maxwell Azila-Gbettor, Christopher Mensah, Martin Kwasi Abiemo and Mavis Agbodza

The study examines a mediated, moderated process of students' intellectual engagement from optimism, academic self-efficacy and academic burnout.

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines a mediated, moderated process of students' intellectual engagement from optimism, academic self-efficacy and academic burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Five hundred and twenty-seven participants who completed a self-reported questionnaire were selected using a convenient sampling technique. PLSc was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that optimism positively affects students' intellectual engagement and academic self-efficacy. Additionally, academic self-efficacy correlates positively with students' intellectual engagement and further mediates the relationship between optimism and intellectual engagement. Finally, the moderation effect of academic burnout was positive and non-significant.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to have tested a model including optimism, academic self-efficacy, intellectual engagement and academic burnout in a university setup from a developing country perspective.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Edem M. Azila-Gbettor, Christopher Mensah and Martin Kwasi Abiemo

The paper examined the mediating effect of meaningfulness of study on the relation between self-efficacy and academic programme satisfaction within higher education setup.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examined the mediating effect of meaningfulness of study on the relation between self-efficacy and academic programme satisfaction within higher education setup.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 376 randomly selected students took part in the study by completing a self-reported survey. Data were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

Results suggest self-efficacy and meaningfulness of studies positively predict student's satisfaction with academic programme. Besides, meaningfulness of study mediates the relation between self-efficacy and student's satisfaction of academic programme.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to provide empirical evidence of the influence of meaningfulness of studies on self-efficacy and student academic programme satisfaction in the higher education context.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Edem Maxwell Azila-Gbettor, Christopher Mensah, Eli Ayawo Atatsi and Martin Kwasi Abiemo

The study examines a mediated mechanism for enhancing students' engagement i.e. peer, intellectual and academic engagement within a higher education setup via the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines a mediated mechanism for enhancing students' engagement i.e. peer, intellectual and academic engagement within a higher education setup via the interaction of hope and mindfulness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were conveniently collected using self-reported questionnaires from a sample of 542 students. PLSc-SEM was used to test the stated hypotheses.

Findings

Results from the analysis showed hope and mindfulness positively predict student academic, peer and intellectual engagements. Furthermore, mindfulness positively mediates the effect of hope on academic, peer and intellectual engagements.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that management of higher institutions must develop effective and efficient policies targeted at enhancing students' hope and mindful awareness.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine a model involving mindfulness, hope and peer, intellectual and academic engagement.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Christopher Mensah and Edem M. Azila-Gbettor

Academic misconduct has become an albatross on the management of higher education institutions with long-term ramification on developmental agenda of countries. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Academic misconduct has become an albatross on the management of higher education institutions with long-term ramification on developmental agenda of countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between religiousness of students and examination cheating tendencies. Further, this paper explored the cheating methods, reasons for cheating and the relationship between perception of peer cheating and examination cheating propensity among students in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research design was adopted for the study using questionnaires to collect data from 355 students in a three-year higher national diploma awarding technical university in Ghana. Descriptive statistics, Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests were the main data analytical tools.

Findings

Results of the study revealed that “fear of failure” was the leading reason driving students’ examination cheating behaviours. Perception of peer cheating was related to levels of self-reported cheating whereas religious inclination of students was uncorrelated with the self-reported cheating behaviour of students.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide implication for management of higher education institutions. The academic counselling unit of higher education institutions should work to dispel students’ overly sensitivity to end-of-semester examinations. Teachings of religious groups should highlight examination cheating as constituting violations of religious values and norms.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the pioneers of examination cheating and religiosity relationship in Ghana’s higher education settings. This study makes an additional contribution to the literature on the religiosity examination cheating nexus.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Christopher Mensah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived dependence on tips and vulnerability to sexual harassment (SH) among hotel employees in Accra…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived dependence on tips and vulnerability to sexual harassment (SH) among hotel employees in Accra Metropolis, Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a cross-sectional research design, 583 employees from 55 hotels completed self-administered questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, χ2 test of independence, Kruskal–Wallis test were used to analyse collected data.

Findings

Results of the study reveal that dependence on tips is related to SH vulnerability of food and beverage staff. Furthermore, dependence on tips engenders a perception of SH climate. Compared to guests and co-workers, supervisors were least identified as perpetrators of SH in hotel workspaces. Guests were responsible for unwanted sexual attention, whereas co-workers pose the greatest risk for gender harassment.

Practical implications

Hotel management should invest in the publication of educational materials such as leaflets and posters indicating unacceptability of inappropriate sexual behaviours.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the pioneers to have assessed the relationship between dependence on tips and perceived climate for SH as well as vulnerability to SH in a hotel context.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Edem Maxwell Azila-Gbettor, Eli Ayawo Atatsi, Christopher Mensah and Martin K. Abiemo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between self-esteem (SE), university commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) within a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between self-esteem (SE), university commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) within a higher education setup.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 354 students in a three-year higher national diploma awarding technical university in Ghana participated in the study via the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and partial least square-based structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) were used to analyze data.

Findings

Path results using a PLS-SEM analysis showed a positive and significant association between SE and OCBs and university commitment among the students. Furthermore, OCBs were found to partially mediate the relationship between SE and university commitment.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide important implication for management of higher education institutions. Management of higher education institutions must orient academic and non-academic staff to adopt communication strategies that help to improve students’ self-worth and assertiveness. All students should be encouraged to participate in extra-curricular activities in order to build students’ beliefs about themselves and self-confidence.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to have tested a model including SE, university commitment and OCBs in a technical university setup from a developing country perspective.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2022

Ebenezer Afum, Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Charles Baah, George Asamoah and Lawrence Yaw Kusi

The compounding impacts of climate change has mobilised unstinting endeavours of researchers, ecologists and corporate leaders to explore new ways for the logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

The compounding impacts of climate change has mobilised unstinting endeavours of researchers, ecologists and corporate leaders to explore new ways for the logistics industry to manage environmental problems, improve social outcomes and gain competitive advantage. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mediation roles of inbound green logistics practices and outbound green logistics practices between eco-market orientation, green value competitiveness and social sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing explanatory research design, with questionnaire-based survey, data for the study was collected from Ghanaian logistics firms. The data is analysed using the partial least square structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that eco-market orientation has a significant positive impact on green value competitiveness. However, eco-market orientation was found to have an insignificant impact on social sustainability. The results further confirmed the notion that eco-market orientation substantially strengthens the implementation of inbound green logistics practices and outbound green logistics practices. Specifically, the mediation analysis confirmed that inbound green logistics practices and outbound green logistics practices serve as indirect mechanisms through which eco-market orientation significantly influences green value competitiveness and social sustainability.

Originality/value

Compared to previous literature, this is a pioneer study that develops an explanatory research framework under the lenses of the natural resource-based theory, stakeholder theory and resource advantage theory in illuminating how inbound green logistics practices and outbound green logistics practices act as mediation mechanisms between eco-market orientation and green value competitiveness and eco-market orientation and social sustainability.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Christopher Hunt, Angela Mensah, Anthony Buxton and Richard Holman

This work sets out to characterise the protective properties of conformal coatings and how they degrade.

Abstract

Purpose

This work sets out to characterise the protective properties of conformal coatings and how they degrade.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach dosed several commercial coatings with two different contaminants, a synthetic generic flux mixture of dibasic acids in both a solvent‐ and water‐based carrier, and sodium chloride. The protective properties were monitored using three complementary techniques: surface insulation resistance measurements, sequential electrochemical reduction analysis, and diffusion measurements.

Findings

The experimental approach was verified and the SIR measurements were shown to be the most valuable. Coatings offered varying levels of resistance to the contaminants, with the silicone coating being the most resistant. The flux variants generally proved more harmful to the coatings, suggesting that flux diffusion through the coating exceeded that of NaCl and hence led to greater electrochemical corrosion. Flux transmission through the coatings was verified by the diffusion measurements.

Research limitations/implications

The project only investigated a limited number of contaminates on simple single sided boards. Future work will investigate coverage effects and a wider range of contaminants.

Practical implications

The work shows that coatings can allow diffusion of contaminates, particularly organics, which can lead to corrosion. The test methodology described here can be used to characterise coating susceptibility.

Originality/value

This work starts to develop for the first time a test methodology to characterise the protective properties of conformal coatings, and shows that flux, and hence other similar organic contaminants, may represent a protection challenge for some coating chemistries.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Shikha Aggarwal and Manoj Kumar Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to explore the phenomenon of collaborative resilience through in-depth case study research in India. This study endeavours to identify and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the phenomenon of collaborative resilience through in-depth case study research in India. This study endeavours to identify and model the critical success factors of collaborative resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight critical success factors of collaborative resilience were identified through literature search. Modelling and analysis of these factors was conducted using grey-based DEMATEL method. Data were collected from supply chain experts in Indian industries.

Findings

It was found that organizational factors like top management commitment and resilience system design exhibit highest causality on the entire system. Also, co-adaptive transformation and resilience goal alignment are most important for managers. Overall, this research provides a guideline and mechanism to build collaborative resilience in supply chains.

Practical implications

Through the identification of eight critical success factors, this research has related and grounded the concept of collaborative resilience into pre-exiting supply chain practices and concepts. Through rigorous quantitative modelling and analysis of these factors, this research provides a guideline to managers for building collaborative resilience in supply chains.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has proposed the concept of collaborative resilience in supply chain and has conducted empirical research on the phenomenon in India.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Cigdem Gonul Kochan and David R. Nowicki

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused…

4905

Abstract

Purpose

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused review of the SCRES literature by investigating supply chain (SC) capabilities, their relationship to SCRES outcomes and the underpinning theoretical mechanisms of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the systematic literature review approach to examine 383 articles published between 2000 and 2017, ultimately down selecting to the most relevant 228 peer-reviewed studies. Context-interventions-mechanisms-outcomes (CIMO) logic is applied to organize and synthesize these peer-reviewed studies. A typological framework is developed from the CIMO-based classification of the SCRES literature.

Findings

The findings of this study outline the gaps in the SCRES literature and present an agenda for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents an exploratory research; therefore, the typological model presented is just one of the possible perspectives.

Practical implications

The typology of SCRES literature can help practitioners to understand SCRES and to measure and assess the resilience of SCs.

Originality/value

The paper provides clear definitions of SCRES constructs, develops a typological framework to further understand SCRES and identifies SCRES measures and assessment techniques.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of 66