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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Florence Malongane, Lyndy Joy McGaw and Fhatuwani Nixwell Mudau

The present study was carried out to determine (1) essential minerals, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, moisture and ash of four selected South African herbal teas and…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study was carried out to determine (1) essential minerals, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, moisture and ash of four selected South African herbal teas and (2) the effect of blending bush tea with other known commercial herbal teas.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used to determine moisture and ash contents followed that of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). Nine minerals were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined by Folin–Ciocalteu assay and aluminum chloride colorimetric assay, respectively.

Findings

The results of the study demonstrated that bush tea had a high ash content of 8.01% and special tea (9.23%), while honeybush (1.96%) and rooibos tea (2.17%) exhibited a low ash percentage. The mineral content was higher in bush tea and special tea than in rooibos tea and honeybush tea except for sodium, which was higher in rooibos tea. The blending of bush tea with special tea improved its potassium content from 22,937.00 mg/kg to 23,379.20 mg/kg. Blending bush tea with rooibos tea at a ratio of 25:75 increased the flavonoid content to 12.21 µg/mL.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the nutrients composition cannot be generalized as it is influenced by other factors such as soil type and seasons.

Social implications

Increasing the commercialization of indigenous teas.

Originality/value

The results of the study suggest that bush tea and special tea are nutritionally comparable with South African commercial herbal teas. Thus, the consideration for commercialization of these teas is crucial.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Lutendo Patricia Mathivha, Vuyisile Samuel Thibane and Fhatuwani Nixwell Mudau

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the health and medicinal importance of bush tea (Athrixia phylicoides DC) and special tea (Monsonia burkeana Planch. ex Harv)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the health and medicinal importance of bush tea (Athrixia phylicoides DC) and special tea (Monsonia burkeana Planch. ex Harv), two of Southern African indigenous herbal teas.

Design/methodology/approach

The two herbal teas, A. phylicoides and M. burkeana were extracted individually and in combined ratios for analysis. The phenolic content was determined and the different phenolic compounds were identified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The anti-diabetic activity of the teas was determined by evaluating the inhibition of both α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. The anti-proliferative activity was measured on human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium) assay.

Findings

Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid and quercetin were identified to be present in significant quantities by TLC. The HPLC quantified the presence of catechin (1.567 mg/g) and chlorogenic acid (1.862 mg/g) in special tea while chlorogenic acid (1.288 mg/g) was present in bush tea. Bush tea and special tea expressed significant levels of phenolic content and high antioxidant activities. Special tea (S100) expressed high inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase and HeLa cell line proliferation when compared to bush tea (B100).

Originality/value

Both bush tea and special tea could provide an alternative for treatment and management of both diabetes and cervical cancer. However, future studies are needed to investigate their synergistic effect with a wide range of other commercial herbal teas.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Seuwandhi Buddhika Ranasinghe and Danture Wickramasinghe

Drawing on the ideas of postcolonial hybridity and postcolonial feminism, the purpose of this paper is to explore a contextual variant of neoliberalism, which the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the ideas of postcolonial hybridity and postcolonial feminism, the purpose of this paper is to explore a contextual variant of neoliberalism, which the authors call postcolonial neoliberalism. It unpacks the peculiarities of hybridised practices of management controls therein to reflect on its construction and consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

A seven-month ethnographic study was carried out in a Sri Lankan tea estate to understand both the nature and the practices of these controls.

Findings

Postcolonial neoliberalism has been animated by a hybrid form of management controls encompassing colonial action controls, postcolonial cultural controls and neoliberal results controls. This created an emancipatory space for female workers to engage in some confrontations to attain some compromises.

Originality/value

The message is that the hybridised controls are central to the construction of this form of postcolonial neoliberalism and to its reproduction. However, as these controls accompany a gendered form, female workers find a condition of possibility for some emancipatory potentials within the neoliberal development policy.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Tripti Paul and Sandeep Mondal

There exists insufficient literature on classification and taxonomy of tea leaves supply chain (TLSC), so the purpose of this paper is to study the existing TLSCs and…

Abstract

Purpose

There exists insufficient literature on classification and taxonomy of tea leaves supply chain (TLSC), so the purpose of this paper is to study the existing TLSCs and classify them accordingly. Apart from this, the paper also focuses on identification of key decisions issues in the supply chains (SC) and developing a TLSC decision framework for the state of Assam in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a two-year detailed study on TLSC in Assam which encompasses 22 Tea Estates, 41 Small Tea Gardens (STGs) and a Research Institute (Tocklai Tea Research Institute). Secondary data were collected from relevant websites of various government organizations of India, company’s websites, annual reports, official statements from the companies, tea market reports, annual reports of the Indian Tea Association, the Tea Board of India, Tea Research Institute and published reports, etc.

Findings

The “point of origin” of TLSC is a tea garden, “point of consumption” is considered as a tea factory and green tea leaves (GTLs) forms the basic raw material. This SC includes mainly three players: Tea leaves growers, manufacturers of made tea and tea leaves agents. This study identifies the three types of TLSCs existing in Assam: TLSC1, TLSC2 and TLSC3. Among them, only TLSC1 is both responsive as well as an efficient chain, while the rest are only responsive chains. Later two SCs can be made efficient with the proposed TLSC4.

Research limitations/implications

There is an insufficient literature on classification and taxonomy of TLSC, therefore the study (considerably the classification and taxonomy of TLSC) was developed from the primary data which were collected from the 22 Tea Estates and 41 STGs of four districts of Assam, because of limited time (two years). The study should have involved more tea estates and small tea gardens for better classification and taxonomy.

Practical implications

The proposed model suggests that small tea growers may create a co-operative whereby smaller tea gardens (STGs) (members of the co-operative) unite to act as a single large garden, set up their own co-operative factory and recruit permanent tea plucking laborers. This up-gradation of TLSC2 and TLSC3 to TLSC4 may enable a group of STGs to work in a manner similar to a Tea Estate.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge this is one of the first studies to classify the TLSC in Assam.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Christopher John Etheridge and Emma Derbyshire

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the purpose of the present review was to collate evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic review comprised ten human trials (560 participants), investigating inter-relationships between herbal infusions consumption and health. Only human studies involving German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. Asteraceae), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe Zingiberaceae), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L. Lamiaceae), peppermint (Mentha x spicata L. Lamiaceae)/spearmint (Mentha spicata L. Lamiaceae) and rosehip (Rosa canina L. Rosaceae) teas were included in the present paper.

Findings

Most herbal infusions serve as a good source of flavonoids and other polyphenols in the human diet. Studies included in this paper indicate that herbal infusions (1-3 cups tended to be drank daily; infusion rates up to 15 min) could benefit certain aspects of health. In particular, this includes aspects of sleep quality and glycaemic control (German chamomile), osteoarthritic stiffness and hormone control (spearmint), oxidative stress (lemon balm) and primary dysmenorrhea (rosehip).

Research limitations/implications

Ongoing research is needed using homogenous herbal infusion forms, brewing rates and volumes of water to further reinforce these findings. In the meantime, herbal infusions could provide a useful supplementary approach to improving certain aspects of well-being.

Originality/value

The present paper collates evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 12 May 2016

The move will boost confidence in a sector beset by weak global prices -- averaging 2.26 dollars per kilogramme in the first quarter of 2016, compared to 2.98 dollars per…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB211051

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

The prayer against the Poultry (Hygiene) Regulations which we briefly mentioned in the editorial of our last issue, was lodged as a result of activity by the Environmental…

Abstract

The prayer against the Poultry (Hygiene) Regulations which we briefly mentioned in the editorial of our last issue, was lodged as a result of activity by the Environmental Health Officers' Association. Incidentally it is the first occasion as far as we can recall that a prayer has been lodged against any of the rash of food regulations of recent years, and reflects the strong feelings of the public health inspectorate.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

S. John Mano Raj

This study aims to explore the opportunities and methods for branding fresh tea leaves, currently sold as commodities in the B2B market, as an innovative method by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the opportunities and methods for branding fresh tea leaves, currently sold as commodities in the B2B market, as an innovative method by engaging with a smallholder group. The purpose is to enhance the market competitiveness of the significant number of small tea growers in developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study was conducted comprising a qualitative survey of a farmers' group formed by the smallholding of tea gardens and the sourcing factories in the state of Assam, India. Relevant case studies on the branding of agricultural commodities were also analyzed.

Findings

Smallholding farmers, through collective efforts and with adequate extension and marketing support, can comply with the standards expected from their buyer. Perishable farm produce sold in the B2B market can be differentiated by exploiting attributes beyond the physical product. Market linkages established through innovative practices can enhance the market competitiveness of smallholdings.

Research limitations/implications

Successful branding of tea leaves can encourage similar practice in other agricultural crops as well. This will improve the quality of produce, increase the earnings of smallholdings and at the same time enhance customer value and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to investigate the opportunities for branding tea leaves produced by smallholdings and sold in the B2B market. The findings will be useful to researchers, smallholdings, policymakers, and consumers at large.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2013

Lauretta Rubini, Luca Motta and Marco R. Di Tommaso

The aim of this paper is to emphasize the role of the place of origin in overcoming the information asymmetries that characterize in particular “experience” and “credence” goods.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to emphasize the role of the place of origin in overcoming the information asymmetries that characterize in particular “experience” and “credence” goods.

Design/methodology/approach

After having summarized the role of the country‐of‐origin (COO) in facilitating producers to effectively communicate to consumers the quality of their products, the article presents two case studies: the Chianti Classico wine from Tuscany (Italy) and the tea industry in Guangdong (China).

Findings

Both wine and tea have strong links with their place of origin. The two case studies show that business excellence depends not only on firms' strategy, but also on the territory where firms are located. In the case of Chianti Classico, the territorial brand plays a strategy role for product promotion, while Guangdong seems to be less effective in allowing consumers to perceive, and therefore to appreciate, the tea quality at the international level. This makes it possible to draw from the Italian case some indications that could be applied to the Chinese case but also to other productions in the world where the link with the territory is not sufficiently valorized.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the impossibility of drawing general conclusions from case studies, the two selected ones can be considered as emblematic of two different territorial strategies that over time led to two different results. This could be the starting point for policy makers aimed at valorizing the importance of territory for increasing business excellence.

Practical implications

The analysis suggests that connecting the products to their territory of origin can help firms communicate to consumers the quality of their items. The country of origin can be a powerful tool to reinforce a corporate brand, but of course it means admitting that the competitive advantage of a firm is also the result of collective public or private actions devoted to create and communicate a positive image of a specific locality. This implies a joint effort of firms and policy makers.

Originality/value

The paper underlines the similarities between two apparently very distant products, wine and tea. To appreciate such a similarity makes it possible to identify success factors of one sector that can be used to overcome the weaknesses of the other. The indications that arise from the analysis can also be the basis to re‐define the strategy of several other “credence” goods that require the provision to consumers of tools facilitating their process of quality appreciation of products.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Chandana Alawattage and Danture Wickramasinghe

This paper aims to report on subalterns' emancipatory accounting (SEA) embedded in transformation of governance and accountability structures (GAS) in Ceylon Tea.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on subalterns' emancipatory accounting (SEA) embedded in transformation of governance and accountability structures (GAS) in Ceylon Tea.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on James Scott's political anthropology to examine how subalterns' resistance and emancipatory accounting triggers structural transformations.

Findings

An attempt is made to theorise subaltern resistance as a form of emancipatory accounting. Concerning the commentaries that accounting has been to suppress or hegemonise the subalterns and appreciating the analysis of indigenous resistance implicated in emancipatory potential, this paper examines how a distinct subaltern group in Ceylon Tea deployed their own weapons towards the changes in GAS.

Originality/value

The accounting literature neglects how subalterns reconstruct governance and accountability structures: this paper introduces a social accounting perspective on resistance, control and structural transformations. Also, it introduces to accounting researchers James Scott's political anthropology as an alternative framework.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

1 – 10 of 480