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Article

Abdullah Al-Mamun and Michael Seamer

This study aims to investigate the effects of institutional qualities on corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement from a global perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of institutional qualities on corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement from a global perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine CSR engagement across 83 developed and developing economies focusing on four potential institutional drivers: the rule of law, economic financial development, human capital formation and exposure to international trade.

Findings

The authors find that the level of human capital formation and financial development is positively associated with CSR engagement in both developing and developed economies. However, the rule of law was only associated with CSR engagement in developing economies whereas the level of international trade was found having no association with CSR engagement across both developed economies and developing economies.

Research limitations/implications

The effect of macroinstitutional qualities on aggregate CSR engagement practices across 83 developed and developing economies was examined; however, the analysis did not attempt to identify the relevance of these institutional factors at the micro or mezzo level and how they interplay with firm-level factors.

Practical implications

The empirical findings in this study offer some important insights into the theoretical constructs of institutional qualities and institutional logics that impact CSR engagement from both developing and developed economy contexts. Not only will these findings encourage regulators and stakeholders to call for enhanced CSR engagement, it will also benefit the accounting and assurance profession’s efforts to evaluate organizational risk and mitigate corporate opportunistic use of CSR disclosure. The finding that strengthening a country’s rule of law enhances CSR engagement in developing economies is further evidence for the current debate in the accounting literature regarding mandating firm CSR disclosure.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that improving the level of human capital formation and encouraging financial development is important for the overall social well-being of all economies, whereas developing economies can further encourage CSR engagement by enhancing their rule of law.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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Article

Feng Yanjie and Tongshen Wan

– This research aims to compare website-based investor relations (WIR) in developed and developing economies, represented by the US, UK, Hong Kong and mainland China.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to compare website-based investor relations (WIR) in developed and developing economies, represented by the US, UK, Hong Kong and mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

A WIR level evaluation index consisting of 82 items was constructed, based on website content analysis. Item discrepancies caused by local contexts were considered in order to make the items applicable to all economies. Data were collected from the websites of companies listed in the Dow Jones Industry Average, the biggest 30 companies on the FTSE100, Hang Seng Index and China CNINFO40. The WIR levels of developed and developing economies were evaluated and compared under the index system. T-tests of differences between means were used to evaluate significance.

Findings

Listed companies' WIR levels were very similar between Hong Kong and mainland China as well as between the US and UK, but companies listed in the US and UK have a much higher level of WIR. The differences of WIR between developed and developing economies were very significant. Developed economies' WIR show many advanced features such as using real-time and being more complete, convenient, user-friendly, accurate and fair.

Originality/value

As a comparative study of WIR between developed and developing economies, the study is among the first in this field, especially in including mainland China.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Book part

Gabriel Eweje

This chapter introduces this book’s topics, purpose, and key themes. It summarizes the main objective of this book which is to examine the trends in corporate social…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces this book’s topics, purpose, and key themes. It summarizes the main objective of this book which is to examine the trends in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability in developing and emerging economies.

Methodology/approach

This chapter reviews the extant literature and chapters and offers conceptual development.

Findings

Discussion on CSR and sustainability concepts is growing in developing countries, and many stakeholders including businesses, governments, and universities are working toward achieving sustainability. In addition, it is well documented that multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in developing economies contribute significantly to job creation, growth and development, and poverty alleviation. However, when compared to developed countries there is a general perception that companies, in particular MNEs, do not pay much attention to CSR and sustainability issues. The lack of sophisticated institutional developments and capability in many developing economies compound the situation. Thus, business CSR and sustainability practices play a major role in improving stakeholder relationships.

Practical and social implications

This chapter suggests that in order for developing and emerging economies to move forward and achieve the gains from globalization; businesses, governments, and other stakeholders should work together to benefit from the various initiatives on CSR and sustainability jointly put together for the betterment of the citizens and a prosperous economy.

Originality/value

This chapter contributes to the debate on trends in CSR and sustainability in developing/emerging economies by critically examines what the notions really mean in developing and emerging economies. It emphasizes that CSR and sustainability mean contributing to the well-being of citizens and respond positively to various stakeholder demands by improving the host countries and communities through participation in economic progress, social well-being, improvement in environmental practices, and involvement in citizens’ empowerment and institutional building.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability: Emerging Trends in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-152-7

Keywords

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Article

Kristijan Mirkovski, Robert M. Davison and Maris G. Martinsons

Drawing on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), the purpose of this paper is to explain why and how external environment, governance…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), the purpose of this paper is to explain why and how external environment, governance structures and interpersonal relationships influence information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled information sharing in supply chains (SCs) of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a theory-building approach using a multiple case study design, including four SMEs operating in SCs from two developing economies (i.e. Republic of North Macedonia and People’s Republic of China), in which the authors conduct both within-case and cross-case analyses.

Findings

Social bonds (known as vrski in Macedonian and guanxi in Chinese) were found to govern buyer–supplier exchanges by supporting the establishment of personal trust and the reduction of distrust. These social bonds compensate for the institutional deficiencies in developing economies and thus encourage ICT-enabled information sharing by SMEs in their SCs.

Research limitations/implications

By applying the theoretical perspectives of TCE and SET to the cross-case analysis, the authors develop nine propositions to explain ICT-enabled information sharing and its interdependencies with external environment, governance structures and interpersonal relationships in developing economies. Further research is recommended to refine and test the generalizability of the theoretical model.

Practical implications

Firms have to develop and nurture social bonds with their suppliers from developing economies to reduce risks related to the environmental uncertainty and institutional voids. This can increase trust and decrease distrust associated with ICT-enabled information sharing.

Originality/value

The study examines why and how external environment (environmental uncertainty and institutional environment), social bonds (vrski and guanxi) and interpersonal mechanisms (trust and distrust) influence ICT-enabled information sharing of SMEs operating in developing economies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Anthony Clunies Ross

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by…

Abstract

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by whether the economy is dominated by primary exports, by the importance of the domestic bond market and bank credit, by the extent of existing restriction in foreign exchange and financial markets, by the presence or absence of persistent high inflation, and by the existence or non‐existence of an active international market in the country's currency. Eighteen observations and maxims on stabilisation policy are tentatively drawn (pp. 64–8) from the material reviewed, and the maxims are partly summarised (pp. 69–71) in a schematic assignment, with variations, of targets to instruments.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article

Pami Dua and Niti Khandelwal Garg

The study aims to empirically investigate the trends and determinants of labour productivity of the two broad sectors –industry and services – and their components…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to empirically investigate the trends and determinants of labour productivity of the two broad sectors –industry and services – and their components, namely, manufacturing and market services sectors, in the case of major developing and developed economies of Asia-Pacific over the period 1980-2014 and make a comparison thereof.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses econometric methodology of panel unit root tests, panel cointegration and group-mean full modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS).

Findings

The study finds that while capital deepening, government size, institutional quality, productivity of the other sector and financial openness affect productivity of all the sectors significantly, the impact of human capital and trade openness varies across sectors in the case of developing economies. Furthermore, the impact of technological progress becomes significant in the post-liberalization reforms period in the developing economies. The study further finds that capital deepening, human capital, government size, institutional quality, productivity of the other sector, government size and trade openness are significant determinants of productivity of all sectors of developed economies under consideration. However, the impact of technological progress is stronger for manufacturing sector than services and its components. Furthermore, while both equity and debt liabilities (as measures of financial openness) influence sectoral productivity of industry and manufacturing sectors positively and significantly in case of developed economies, only equity liabilities have a significant influence on the productivity of developing economies. This may indicate existence of more developed financial markets in the case of developed economies.

Originality/value

The study identifies important structural differences in determinants of productivity both across sectors and across developing and developed economies of Asia-Pacific.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

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Article

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, John C. Munene and Charles Akol Malinga

The purpose of this paper is to establish the moderating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between access to finance and growth of small and medium…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the moderating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between access to finance and growth of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in developing economies. Thus, this study seeks to establish whether financial literacy moderates the relationship between access to finance and growth of SMEs in a developing economy like Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional research design was used in the study and data were collected from 169 SMEs located in Jinja and Iganga central markets. ModGraph (excel programme) was used to test for the moderating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between access to finance and growth of SMEs in developing economies.

Findings

The findings reveal a positive and significant moderating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between access to finance and growth of SMEs in developing economies. In addition, financial literacy and access to finance also have significant and positive effects on growth of SMEs in developing economies.

Research limitations/implications

The study collected data from only SMEs located in Uganda, and there is an opportunity to test this finding in other developing economies. Furthermore, the findings from the study are based on quantitative data collected through use of semi-structured questionnaires. Besides, the study was purely cross-sectional; hence, it ignores the characteristics of SMEs, which could be investigated using a longitudinal study design.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of financial literacy in promoting access to finance, which is necessary for the growth of SMEs in developing economies. Owners of SMEs could attend financial literacy programmes provided by entrepreneurial skill development organizations to enable them to acquire financial knowledge and skills to make wise and better financial decisions and choices.

Originality/value

The study contributes to existing international entrepreneurship literature by indicating the moderating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between access to finance and growth of SMEs in developing economies. The study shows that for SMEs to access finance to grow there is a need for financial literacy that promotes effective and efficient use of loans/credits. SMEs in developing economies need financial literacy, which helps them make wise financial decisions and choices before accessing financial services like loans.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Article

Amer Al-Roubaie and Shafiq Alvi

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential impact that collaboration between East and West could have on sustainable development. Greater emphasis in this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential impact that collaboration between East and West could have on sustainable development. Greater emphasis in this paper will be placed on the benefit that developing countries gain from building collaborative relations with the West. Obtaining access to knowledge and technology will enable developing countries to speed up the process of socio-economic transformation and sustain development. Developing countries can leapfrog by making use of the existing knowledge in the West.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides descriptive assessment of the relationship between East and West to foster growth and sustain development. The paper uses newly developed ideas to build capacity for knowledge transfer to create linkages and accelerate the process of economic growth. The approach to knowledge-based development requires the creation of an enabling environment driven by skills, innovation, institutions and ICT.

Findings

The paper suggests that knowledge transfer enables developing countries to sustain development. Access to global/western knowledge allows developing countries to diversify their economic structure and increase productivity. Technological learning and knowledge absorption permit these countries to leapfrog by surpassing several stages in their development.

Practical implications

Information in this paper provides insight into the merits of the new economy and the potential benefits that developing countries can obtain from participating in the global economy. Indigenous knowledge and local innovation are important for local development, which can be enhanced through technology transfer and knowledge dissemination.

Originality/value

Unlike traditional economic theories in which capital and labor provide the main inputs in production, this paper discusses a new approach to development where knowledge, skills and innovation represent the main forces behind growth. The paper explores new ideas to generate linkage and sustain development.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Content available
Article

Yao Ouyang

The development economics of large countries is a subject that studies how large developing countries evolve into developed countries through industrialization and…

Abstract

Purpose

The development economics of large countries is a subject that studies how large developing countries evolve into developed countries through industrialization and structural transformation. By looking into the economic development of large developing countries in a systematic way, the purpose of this paper is to propose a logical system consisting of research objects, main issues, key principles and development strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A large developing country refers to a country with a dual economic structure; it has a large population, vast territory and great market potential, but is low in labour productivity and per capita income.

Findings

The key issue of the large country’s economy is the issue of the size, while the key issue of the developing country’s economy is the issue of the economic structure. Therefore, the key issue of the economy of large developing courtiers lies in both the size and economic structure.

Originality/value

The endogenous capacity of a large country depends on the size of factors and the balance of supply and demand, while the comprehensive advantage of a large country depends on its diversified industrial structure and integration of factors. Based on the basic characteristics and key economic principles, large developing countries should seek endogenous, stable, coordinated and innovative development.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

Keywords

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