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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Anne Maarit Jalkala and Joona Keränen

Despite increasing interest in customer solutions, and the importance of brand management in the B2B context, prior research provides little understanding on brand

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9334

Abstract

Purpose

Despite increasing interest in customer solutions, and the importance of brand management in the B2B context, prior research provides little understanding on brand positioning strategies adopted by solution providers. The present study aims to examine the possible brand positioning strategies for industrial firms providing customer solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical part of the present study consists of a multiple case study, involving four industrial firms providing customer solutions. Primary data was gathered by semi-structured interviews from a total of 22 business managers from the case companies.

Findings

The present study identifies four possible brand position strategies for industrial firms providing customer solutions: customer value diagnostic, global solution integrator, high quality sub-systems provider, and long-term service partner. The identified strategies highlight the tendency of solution suppliers to position their brands around different capabilities that are needed at different phases of the solution delivery process.

Research limitations/implications

The present study was conducted from the industrial supplier's perspective and is context-bound to companies operating in solution-oriented process and information technology industries.

Practical implications

Managers need to identify the capabilities that are central to delivering customer value and acquire and/or develop capability configurations that differentiate their brand positioning from competitors.

Originality/value

Existing literature on branding lacks understanding about the specific characteristics of building brands in solution-oriented B2B contexts. The present study identifies four brand positioning strategies that illuminate the special characteristics of branding customer solutions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Timo Muhonen, Saku Hirvonen and Tommi Laukkanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance effects of brand identity in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

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3853

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance effects of brand identity in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine whether brand identity mediates the relationship between brand orientation and brand performance, and further, whether brand performance leads to better financial performance. The authors also study whether these performance effects are moderated by customer type and industry type. Differing from earlier research, this study analyzes brand identity through its constituent components: brand values, brand vision and brand positioning. The data include altogether 721 effective responses from Finnish SMEs. Structural equation modeling is used for testing the research hypotheses.

Findings

Brand positioning and brand vision have a direct positive effect on brand performance, which in turn, positively affects financial performance. Brand orientation drives the components of brand identity. Importantly, there is variation in some of the relationships between brand orientation, brand values, brand vision and brand positioning across business-to-business firms and business-to-customer firms, and across firms in service industries and in production industries.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a single-country sample. Including additional factors for the model with the potential to moderate the described relationships is also called for. Future research could also consider new potential brand identity components currently not addressed in the paper.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by increasing the knowledge of SME branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Andreas Strebinger

This study aims to compare academic prescriptive models on how to choose a branding strategy on the continuum from a “branded house” to a “house of brands” with real-life…

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8324

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare academic prescriptive models on how to choose a branding strategy on the continuum from a “branded house” to a “house of brands” with real-life branding strategies of leading companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from an executive survey, observations and desk research on 75 leading companies in Austria are analysed with multilevel weighted least squares (WLS) regression.

Findings

Branding strategies for products are determined by industry (23 per cent of variance), the overall strategy of the company (28 per cent), the remaining variance being product-level decisions deviating from both. Service and consumer durables companies lean more towards corporate branding than consumer nondurables. On the company level, synergies in advertising, e-commerce and e-CRM (customer-relationship management) increase the usage of shared brands. A higher company age leads to brand proliferation. On the product level, quality differences between products, the emphasis on and differences in experiential product positioning and, marginally, the symbolic differences between products favour individual brands.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate additional markets, additional drivers, small and medium-sized entreprises (SMEs) and employ additional measures.

Practical implications

The study informs brand-architecture audits with benchmarks from leading companies, calls for a view of brand architecture more flexible than ideal-type categories proposed in literature and cautions against management inertia, industry standards and trends in designing branding strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first quantitative cross-industry multi-level study on real-life branding strategies. It also applies a new conceptualisation and measurement of branding strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Siyu Gong, Guanghua Sheng, Peter Peverelli and Jialin Dai

This study aims to develop a comprehensive conceptual framework to investigate how green brand positioning strategies positively impact consumer response. It focusses on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a comprehensive conceptual framework to investigate how green brand positioning strategies positively impact consumer response. It focusses on uncovering the causal mechanism in which such effect is mediated by brand stereotypes. Additionally, it outlines the moderating role of construal level in this formation process.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies were conducted to examine the hypotheses. Study 1 tests the positive influence of green brand positioning on consumer response. Study 2 tests the dual mediating effect of warmth and competence in the relationship between green brand positioning and consumer response. Study 3 further examines the moderating role of construal level in the effects of green brand positioning on brand stereotypes.

Findings

The findings reveal that green emotional positioning strategies are predominantly stereotyped as warm while green functional positioning strategies are predominantly stereotyped as competent. Both warm and competent mediate the effects of green brand positioning on consumer response. Furthermore, a congruency between green emotional positioning and high-level construal, as well as the match between green functional positioning and low-level construal, leads to more warmth and competence perception.

Originality/value

This study contributes to green brand management literature by proposing a brand stereotype-based mechanism to explain how green brand positioning strategies trigger consumers’ stereotyping process, leading to positive consumer response. This study also identifies the construal level as a moderating variable that impacts consumers’ warmth and competence perceptions towards two kinds of green brand positioning strategies. Managerially, the findings of this study provide managerial ideas for developing green branding strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Patrick Hartmann, Vanessa Apaolaza Ibáñez and F. Javier Forcada Sainz

Proposes a set of strategic options for green brand positioning, based either on functional brand attributes or on emotional benefits. The aim of the study is to test the…

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39317

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes a set of strategic options for green brand positioning, based either on functional brand attributes or on emotional benefits. The aim of the study is to test the suggested green positioning strategies against one another, assessing their effect on perceived brand positioning and brand attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model of the dimensionality and attitudinal effects of green brand positioning was developed. Both suggested alternatives to green brand positioning, along with a combined functional and emotional strategy, were tested in an experimental online setting. The hypothesized model was tested in the scope of exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results indicate an overall positive influence of green brand positioning on brand attitude. Further findings suggest distinct functional and emotional dimensions of green brand positioning with the interaction of both dimensions in the formation of brand attitude. Highest perceptual effects were achieved through a green positioning strategy that combined functional attributes with emotional benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The measures used, while providing good reliability and validity, have their limitations, especially in the case of the emotional dimension of green brand associations. Future research should concentrate on the further development of the constructs used in the study, particularly that of the emotional dimension of green brand associations and replicate the study under “real‐life” conditions within different product categories and with a representative sample.

Practical implications

A well implemented green positioning strategy can lead to a more favourable perception of the brand, giving support to the green marketing approach in general. This study supports significant attitude effects of both functional and emotional green positioning strategies. Thus, brand managers should deliver emotional benefits through the brand, at the same time making sure that target groups perceive real environmental benefits.

Originality/value

Although green marketing has been an important research topic for more than three decades, hardly any research has been conducted that focuses specifically on green branding. This paper analyses the dimensionality of green brand positioning, offers green branding insight and suggests strategic tools for brand managers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Mahim Sagar, Rishabh Khandelwal, Amit Mittal and Deepali Singh

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Ethical Positioning Index (EPI), an innovative ranking scale based on the ethical issues in brand positioning. This paper is…

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6216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Ethical Positioning Index (EPI), an innovative ranking scale based on the ethical issues in brand positioning. This paper is based on the core idea that ethics can be used as a product differentiator and can create a strategic advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Five basic elements of brand positioning, brand identity, brand image, brand personality, brand awareness, and brand communication, are blended with the three basic elements of ethics; beliefs, values, and symbols and customs. The EPI emerges from the established ethical brand positioning framework and the analysis from the conducted survey which was composed of brand positioning and ethics questions.

Findings

Consumer driven weights have been obtained and a mathematical model has been proposed to evaluate the total score and finally the ranking of the brands.

Research limitations/implications

The EPI parameters' weight will vary owing to the non‐existence of universal ethics and hence subsequently every cohort will have its own weight.

Practical implications

EPI will be an important tool from the managerial point of view as it serves as a step‐by‐step guide to compare the position of the brand in an integrated and ethical manner.

Social implications

The EPI will bring a change in the ideology of the brands, making them employ more ethical perspectives in their branding, which will be highly welcomed by consumers and society.

Originality/value

The role of ethics in brand positioning has been studied and blended to generate a novel‐ranking scale (EPI).

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Jacek Pogorzelski

Abstract

Details

Managing Brands in 4D
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-102-1

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Ilaria Baghi and Veronica Gabrielli

Past research on cause-related marketing (CRM) suggests that these socially beneficial initiatives can be implemented as co-branding strategies. Little is known, however…

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1676

Abstract

Purpose

Past research on cause-related marketing (CRM) suggests that these socially beneficial initiatives can be implemented as co-branding strategies. Little is known, however, about the role of brand prominence, in terms of visual conspicuousness of the two brands that are partner-involved (for-profit and non-profit brands). This study aims to advance a model of moderated mediation that explains how and under what circumstances brand prominence disparity enhances consumers’ attitudes toward CRM co-branded products and increases purchase intention

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test a model of moderated mediation in two studies. Study 1 shows that the effectiveness of brand prominence disparity is explained by the mediating role of attitude toward a CRM co-branded product. Study 2 demonstrates that this mediation is moderated by the positioning of the for-profit brand partner (luxury vs non-luxury positioning).

Findings

Results show that brand prominence disparity has a role in defining consumers’ purchase intention toward a CRM co-branded product through mediation of attitude. Moreover, positioning of the for-profit brand partner moderates the cognitive processes activated by the visual brand prominence. In luxury positioning, a loud visual prominence of the for-profit brand significantly improves consumers’ attitudes and intentions to buy the CRM co-branded product.

Originality/value

The study extends our understanding of how visual brand presence can promote the effectiveness of co-branded CRM initiatives, and it offers practical guidelines for marketers wishing to partner with social causes, while promoting products with luxury or non-luxury features.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Jami Lobpries, Gregg Bennett and Natasha Brison

The purpose of this paper is to compare the extended brand identities of two elite female athletes. Specifically, this exploratory case study assessed the extended brand

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the extended brand identities of two elite female athletes. Specifically, this exploratory case study assessed the extended brand identities of Jennie Finch and Cat Osterman, two iconic female softball athlete brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the qualitative analysis of individual in-depth, semi-structured interviews, various documents, and social media, data revealed themes associated with positioning, personality, and presentation of the female athlete brands.

Findings

Theoretically, the themes provide empirical support for existing brand identity frameworks.

Practical implications

Practically, findings provide evidence for defining an athlete’s extended brand identity that can serve as the foundation for branding efforts that generate long-term value during and after their sport careers.

Originality/value

This case study adds to the extant literature on athlete branding and offers practical content for marketers seeking to brand female athletes.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Leslie de Chernatony and Susan Segal‐Horn

There are few valuable services brands, which may be due to the lack of services branding knowledge and the inappropriate use of product‐based branding advice. To…

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21139

Abstract

There are few valuable services brands, which may be due to the lack of services branding knowledge and the inappropriate use of product‐based branding advice. To contribute to services branding knowledge the authors undertook a review of the services management and services branding literature and postulated a model of services branding. In‐depth interviews with 28 leading‐edge consultants showed the appropriateness of this model. The study found a need for ruthless clarity about positioning and the corporation's genuinely felt values. Success is more likely when everyone internally believes in their brand's values. When management behaviour is based on genuine conviction, shared values are more likely. Through shared values, there is a greater likelihood of commitment, internal loyalty, clearer brand understanding, and importantly, consistent brand delivery across all stakeholders. By viewing these factors within a systems perspective, greater services brand consistency can result.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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