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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Chatrathi P. Rao and Zhengyuan Wang

Examines alternate segmentation strategies in the standardindustrial products market. Using data obtained from 164 Indianindustrial buyers, provides several empirical…

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3351

Abstract

Examines alternate segmentation strategies in the standard industrial products market. Using data obtained from 164 Indian industrial buyers, provides several empirical tests of a widely held belief that traditional segmentation approaches may serve as effective surrogate measures for distinct benefit segments. Results suggest that the link between traditional and benefit segmentation approaches are far weaker than might be expected. There is no strong empirical evidence supporting the proposition that benefit segments derived from cluster analysis are dependent on sales volume, industry type, characteristics of purchasing agents, and other potential correlates of benefit segments. The findings have implications for both academics and practitioners in industrial marketing.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Raj Singh Minhas and Everett M. Jacobs

Banks and building societies typically focus on geographic, demographic, socio‐economic, and psychological characteristics to segment the market for financial services…

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6971

Abstract

Banks and building societies typically focus on geographic, demographic, socio‐economic, and psychological characteristics to segment the market for financial services, although these are not efficient predictors of future buying behaviour. To correct this shortcoming, benefit segmentation by factor analysis has been used for the first time to group building society customers in relation to their particular attitudes and behaviour. Identifies eight benefits (listed in order of their popularity): personal service, investment, limited banking, accessible cash, cash card, advice, money management, and full banking. Incongruities between certain of the benefits, and the differing customer profiles for each benefit segment were analysed. Makes suggestions on how building societies and banks could use benefit segmentation to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their marketing strategies.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Shwu‐Ing Wu

Uses benefit needs to segment the online marketing market. Employs focus groups and a random sampling survey to search for consumer benefit needs and then segments the…

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3447

Abstract

Uses benefit needs to segment the online marketing market. Employs focus groups and a random sampling survey to search for consumer benefit needs and then segments the market by these benefits sought by customers. Shows that the various segments display significant differences in the benefits sought, lifestyles and demographics etc. Suggests that this work can assist marketing managers to focus on one or more segments that show salient consumer preferences for the benefits provided by their products or services.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Lesedi Tomana Nduna and Cine van Zyl

The purpose of this study is to investigate benefits tourist seek when visiting a nature-based tourism destination to develop a benefit segmentation framework.

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1288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate benefits tourist seek when visiting a nature-based tourism destination to develop a benefit segmentation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used quantitative research methods, with 400 self-administered survey administered to a sample of 400 tourists visiting the Kruger, Panorama, and Lowveld areas in Mpumalanga.

Findings

Cluster analysis produced two benefit segments. Binary logistic regression benefits that emerged from the cluster analysis were statistically significant predictors of the attractions tourists visited and the activities in which they participated during their stays in Mpumalanga. Factor-cluster analysis and binary logistic regression results were used to develop a benefit segmentation framework as a marketing planning tool.

Research limitations/implications

The study was only based on Mpumalanga Province and therefore, the results cannot be generalised. The study was conducted over one season, the Easter period

Practical implications

The proposed benefit segmentation framework provides a tool that destination management organisations can use to plan effectively for marketing.

Social implications

Effective marketing may lead to increased tourism growth which can have a multiplier effect on the destination.

Originality/value

This article is based on a master’s study conducted in Mpumalanga and results are presented on this paper.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Günther Botschen, Eva M. Thelen and Rik Pieters

Although the basic idea of benefit segmentation lies in using causal, as opposed to descriptive, factors as segmentation criteria, most of the empirical studies do not…

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6573

Abstract

Although the basic idea of benefit segmentation lies in using causal, as opposed to descriptive, factors as segmentation criteria, most of the empirical studies do not differentiate between product attributes and the benefit sought by consumers. The objectives of this article are to clarify the distinction between attributes and benefits sought, and to apply a modified laddering technique, based on means‐end theory to use the elicited benefits to form benefit segments. A comparison with attribute‐based segments demonstrates that means‐end chains provide a powerful tool for “truebenefit segmentation.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Khaldoon Nusair, Hamed Alazri, Usamah F. Alfarhan and Saeed Al-Muharrami

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to international tourism market segmentation research by proposing a comprehensive framework that examines behavioral, benefits

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to international tourism market segmentation research by proposing a comprehensive framework that examines behavioral, benefits and lifestyle segmentations. The moderating roles of geographic segmentation (nationality) and advertising media types are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Tourists volunteered to participate in a self-administered survey at random during peak seasons. Total number of collected questionnaires was 966. The authors used WarpPLS 6.0 software to analyze data.

Findings

Results from a sample of 919 tourists show that tourists in the benefit segmentation cluster had intentions to revisit the destination but they were unlikely to recommend it to others. Another finding indicates that marketing campaigns on different advertising media types might have different results when targeting different activities.

Originality/value

Leaning on the foundations of the marketing literature and the market segmentation theory, this research attempts to create a theoretical contribution that can be used to segment international tourists based on their travel motivations. Additionally, this study highlights the power of conditional probability approach, as it could be of more value than the predominant path coefficient approach.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Mario Duarte Canever, Hans van Trijp and Ivo van der Lans

This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of different segmentation schemes as the basis of marketing strategy, with particular respect to supply‐chain decisions, and to…

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2909

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of different segmentation schemes as the basis of marketing strategy, with particular respect to supply‐chain decisions, and to propose a new procedure capable of combining benefits sought and features available.

Design/methodology/approach

In a study of buyers and consumers of beef in Brazil, segments based on three approaches were derived by hierarchical cluster analysis, fine‐tuned by K‐means cluster analysis. The outcome was evaluated for the viability and actionability of the preferred procedure, both objectively and through interviews with managers in the beef‐supply business.

Findings

The results revealed that a segmentation scheme combining benefits sought and features available yields more homogeneous and actionable segments, and has real promise as an input to the formulation and implementation of supply‐chain strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This promising innovation in market segmentation requires further study, and testing in the marketplace.

Practical implications

The proposed system is a usable aid to decision making.

Originality/value

The paper proposes an original approach to market segmentation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Russell I. Haley

During the more than twenty years since its inception the technique of Benefit Segmentation has become a familiar method of analyzing markets to discover segmentation

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1016

Abstract

During the more than twenty years since its inception the technique of Benefit Segmentation has become a familiar method of analyzing markets to discover segmentation opportunities. Almost every major marketer of consumer goods and services has attempted to use this method one or more times. However, the degree of success which has attended its use has varied. In this article its originator, Dr. Russell I. Haley, examines the reasons for this variation, offers guidelines for proper use, and suggests directions for further improvements in the method.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Sally Dibb and Lyndon Simkin

Organizations wishing to apply the principles of market segmentation often face problems putting the theory into practice. All too often the required background analysis…

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18464

Abstract

Organizations wishing to apply the principles of market segmentation often face problems putting the theory into practice. All too often the required background analysis is inadequate or poorly structured or the translation of segmentation strategy into marketing programs is impeded. To be successful, segmentation must lead an organization through a process which undertakes background analysis, determines strategy and develops marketing programs. However, there are a number of points at which the process can break down. Shows how the segmentation program described has tackled these difficulties, leading several management teams through the analysis, strategy and program elements of the market segmentation process. A range of benefits arise from the program. Primary benefits are that the process puts the customer first, maximizes resources and emphasizes strengths over competitors. Secondary benefits relate to the development of a more market‐focussed company culture and the building of inter‐ and intra‐organizational relationships.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Sally Dibb and Robin Wensley

The underlying managerial rationale for segmenting markets is well established, with the marketing literature citing a range of benefits for businesses adopting a…

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6909

Abstract

The underlying managerial rationale for segmenting markets is well established, with the marketing literature citing a range of benefits for businesses adopting a segmentation approach. Yet organisations frequently encounter difficulties in implementing segmentation principles. Even in the industrial marketing literature, where the most practical implementation guidance is offered, it is suggested that organisations tend to over‐emphasise the mechanics of segmentation, while failing to correctly implement the findings. This suggests that, if organisations are to benefit from applying segmentation principles, two fundamental questions should be addressed. The first concerns the basic conditions which must be met if implementation is to be effected. That is, it must be possible to map the dimensions developed on to usable customer characteristics. The second concerns the costs and benefits of the segmentation solution in relation to the proportion of variance in customer requirements which it explains. Addresses these questions in an industrial marketing context, using a literature review and quantitative analysis of data from the European car parts after market. The analysis shows that whilst traditional segmentation methods can be used to identify certain segments, these segments do not readily map on to implementable dimensions. Furthermore, it is suggested that even a relatively wide use of structural independent variables explains only a very small proportion of the individual variability in customer requirements. This suggests that much segmentation analysis may be poorly directed and also of rather limited practical value.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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