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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Lesedi Tomana Nduna and Cine van Zyl

The purpose of this study is to investigate benefits tourist seek when visiting a nature-based tourism destination to develop a benefit segmentation framework.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate benefits tourist seek when visiting a nature-based tourism destination to develop a benefit segmentation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used quantitative research methods, with 400 self-administered survey administered to a sample of 400 tourists visiting the Kruger, Panorama, and Lowveld areas in Mpumalanga.

Findings

Cluster analysis produced two benefit segments. Binary logistic regression benefits that emerged from the cluster analysis were statistically significant predictors of the attractions tourists visited and the activities in which they participated during their stays in Mpumalanga. Factor-cluster analysis and binary logistic regression results were used to develop a benefit segmentation framework as a marketing planning tool.

Research limitations/implications

The study was only based on Mpumalanga Province and therefore, the results cannot be generalised. The study was conducted over one season, the Easter period

Practical implications

The proposed benefit segmentation framework provides a tool that destination management organisations can use to plan effectively for marketing.

Social implications

Effective marketing may lead to increased tourism growth which can have a multiplier effect on the destination.

Originality/value

This article is based on a master’s study conducted in Mpumalanga and results are presented on this paper.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Nkholedzeni Sidney Netshakhuma

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which the Mpumalanga Provincial Archives (MPA) complies with the Mpumalanga Archives Act, 2008 legislative/policy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which the Mpumalanga Provincial Archives (MPA) complies with the Mpumalanga Archives Act, 2008 legislative/policy provisions of archives building, capacity building and electronic records management and to suggest recommendations for effective archives and records management (ARM) programme in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a quantitative approach supplemented by qualitative data using document review to collect data and content analysis.

Findings

The results show that MPA enacted Mpumalanga Archives Act, 2008. However, the challenge is the implementation of such legislation. The findings of this paper would contribute towards the literature in archival legislation in South Africa and other parts of the world.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the paper was based in South Africa, it was limited to the MPA of South Africa.

Practical implications

The findings are expected to be instrumental in the implementation of Mpumalanga Archives Act, 2008.

Social implications

The findings and recommendations will help in guiding MPA on the implementation of an effective provincial archive and records to facilitate the effective management of records to determine those of archival value, to preserve them for posterity and to make them accessible to the public.

Originality/value

This is an original study using a document review to review the Mpumalanga Archives Act, 1998. The effective archives infrastructure will contribute to compliance with legislative components such as archives building, cooperation, ERMS, appraisal and disposal of records, archives advisory body and access to information.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Cyril Ngoasheng, Mpho Ngoepe and Ngoako Solomon Marutha

Audio-visual records produced by public broadcasters play a role in preserving the history, culture and language of a country. The records are used by broadcasters to…

Abstract

Purpose

Audio-visual records produced by public broadcasters play a role in preserving the history, culture and language of a country. The records are used by broadcasters to repeat and support programmes on air. The formats that carry these records such as tapes and compact discs are fragile and have a short life span. This is compounded by evolving technologies and results in obsolete playback equipment, which can result in records not being accessible. This study aims to explore the preservation and access of audio-visual records at the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) radio in Limpopo regional offices.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected through interviews from purposively selected participants in three radio stations of the SABC in the Limpopo province which are Munghana Lonene FM, Phalaphala FM and Thobela FM. The interview data were augmented through participant observation.

Findings

The findings revealed that the SABC radio archive was preserving audio-visual records in obsolete formats such as long plays and cassettes, which also lacked playback equipment. These formats were not properly arranged and were kept in a storage area that was not monitored for decaying and security. It was further established that the radio stations were using IONA technology for retrieval of and access to records while the news division within the radio stations were relying on Electronic News Production System. As audio-visual materials were not catalogued, it proved difficult for users to access these records.

Practical implications

This study adds value to the existing theoretical and conceptual issues that form the ongoing discourse on the preservation of and access to audio-visual records which are often neglected in the developing countries. The study also laid the groundwork for further investigation of the audio-visual records at broadcasting corporations. This is prompted by the findings which established that valuable information has been lost and continues to be lost due to poor management of audio-visual records. Therefore, a further study on migration of content from analogue to digital for the purpose of continuous preservation is recommended.

Originality/value

The study triangulated data collection tools including interviews and participant observation. The context was on the national broadcaster and the focus was on the preservation of and access to audio-visual records for the radio.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Samuel Laryea

Construction project management outcomes in the literature typically portray significant deviations from expected outcomes. Various theories from studies that focus…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction project management outcomes in the literature typically portray significant deviations from expected outcomes. Various theories from studies that focus superficially on causes of project cost and time overruns rather than root causes have not addressed this problem. The need is for a better understanding of how procurement strategy provides a fundamental means to address this problem. The purpose of this paper is to examine the procurement strategy used to deliver a new universities project in South Africa within budget and to ascertain its influence on the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was designed to provide a comprehensive and intensive methodology to identify and examine the construction procurement strategy and its influence on the project outcomes. Document analyses and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data on the construction procurement strategy and outcomes from the client team.

Findings

The evidence brought forward demonstrates that the successful outcome was largely a consequence of the client team, procurement strategy and systems of delivery. However, the collaborative procurement strategy formed the basis of the successful project delivery and outcomes. A general observation from the data is that an appropriate construction procurement strategy developed by an experienced client team and proactively implemented by an integrated delivery team working collaboratively is likely to achieve the intended project outcomes.

Practical implications

The findings show three critical keys to achieving intended outcomes – people, procurement strategy and systems of delivery at the governance, portfolio, programme and project management levels.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in using a comprehensive methodology to study the relationship between procurement strategy and outcomes. The findings can be applied by client teams to achieve better outcomes and value for money in infrastructure projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Shadrack Katuu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges of transforming South Africa’s health sector through the country’s eHealth Strategy and particularly one of its key…

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1197

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges of transforming South Africa’s health sector through the country’s eHealth Strategy and particularly one of its key components, the implementation of an integrated Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS).

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducted an extensive review of literature and used it as a basis to analyse the challenges as well as opportunities in South Africa’s transformation path within its health sector based on the nation’s eHealth Strategy.

Findings

South Africa’s health sector faces three main transformation challenges: inequity, legacy of fragmentation and a service delivery structure biased towards curative rather than preventive services. Health information systems provide a solid platform for improving efficiency but, within South Africa, these systems have been highly heterogeneous. A recent study showed the country had more than 40 individual health information systems scattered in all provinces, with over 50 per cent not adhering to any national or international standards and more than 25 per cent being stand-alone applications that shared information neither locally nor externally. The eHealth Strategy offers a robust platform to start addressing the legacy of fragmentation and lack of interoperability. However, it also raises a few other concerns, including the use of different terminology such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR) interchangeable with Electronic Health Record (EHR), or EDRMS parallel with Electronic Content Management (ECM). In addition, there is the opportunity to explore the use of the maturity model concept in the EDRMS implementation experiences within South Africa.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrated the complex nature of the legacy of fragmentation in South Africa’s health information systems and explored three aspects relating to terminology as well as maturity models that should be considered in the country’s future eHealth Strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Nkholedzeni Sidney Netshakhuma

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of volunteerism during the digitisation project by the Office of the Premier in Mpumalanga with a view recommending the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of volunteerism during the digitisation project by the Office of the Premier in Mpumalanga with a view recommending the best practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data was collected through the semi-structured qualitative interviews with the records manager and ten volunteer archivists employed by the Office of the Premier.

Findings

Local pupils within the Mpumalanga province were recruited to participate in the digitisation project as a form of youth empowerment. The Mpumalanga Provincial Archives was not involved in the digitisation project to ensure that all digitisation specification was in line with the requirement of the provincial archives. Furthermore, a lack of resources to implement the digitisation project was cited as the main stamping block for the successful implementation of the project.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the Office of the premier, in the Mpumalanga province.

Practical implications

Archivists interested in recruiting volunteers on a digitisation project can use this paper to understand the benefits and cost of volunteer labor before putting volunteer projects into practice.

Social implications

The success of a digitisation project depends on the involvement of the Mpumalanga Provincial archives.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique case study in South Africa of a digitisation project staffed with volunteers in the office of the Premier.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Alan Day

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37

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Lisa Marini, Jane Andrew and Sandra van der Laan

The purpose of this paper is to explore how accountability practices are affected and potentially transformed when mediated by translation. Adopting a postcolonial lens…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how accountability practices are affected and potentially transformed when mediated by translation. Adopting a postcolonial lens, the authors consider the ways in which translation functions and how intermediaries act as cultural translators in the context of microfinance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors take a qualitative approach to a case study of a microfinance organization based in South Africa. Fieldwork allowed for the collection of data by means of direct observations, interviews, documents and a fieldwork diary.

Findings

The study demonstrates the presence of spaces of hybridity that co-exist within the same organizational context (Bhabha, 1994). Two spaces of hybridity are highlighted, in which translation processes were possible because of the proximity between borrowers and fieldworkers. The first space of hybridity was found locally and here translation shaped an accountability that aimed at leveraging local cultures and favoring cultural framing. The second space of hybridity was characterized by the interaction between oral and written cultures and the translation of responsibilities and expectations was predominantly unidirectional, prioritizing accountability practices consistent with organizational requirements.

Originality/value

This research offers in-depth insights into the links between intermediation, translation and accountability practices. It differs from prior research in considering intermediaries as active translators of accountability practices who act in-between cultures. The authors contend that the translation process reinscribes culture allowing dominant accountability practices to prevail and local cultural traditions to merely contextualize accountability practices.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Nkholedzeni Sidney Netshakhuma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of climate change on South Africa’s Mpumalanga Provincial Archives (MPA) and related records management activities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of climate change on South Africa’s Mpumalanga Provincial Archives (MPA) and related records management activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach/method was used to collect data from the source, including purposive sampling and expert knowledge solicited through semi-structured interviews. A review was undertaken to source climate data and related archival sector literature.

Findings

Recent extreme weather events in Mpumalanga seem to bear out climate change projections. The current absence of relevant strategies and plans implies that the MPA and provincial departments are not yet prepared for emergencies. The lack of a plan, an implementation strategy and related training may increase the impact of disasters on the provincial archives’ environment. Without disaster plans and robust preparedness, the question of how the MPA is going to preserve archives for future generations is raised. In addition, due to a lack of guidance for registry staff, appraisal is not allowing for identification and processing of archival materials, so combined with a lack of disaster management strategies and plans contributes to the loss of archives.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the MPA; however, the findings may be extended to other South Africa provincial archives and parts of the world experiencing similar issues. There is a need to conduct similar research on a larger scale so as to explore the impact of climate change in other provincial archives to provide a wider context of the problem within South Africa.

Practical implications

When archivists accept holdings into their repositories, they take the responsibility for their archival custody. But, these efforts may come to nothing if the archives are lost. Disaster management is the key to the protection of the archives.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on the impact of climate change on archives. The results achieved should be seen as a first step towards identification of the issue.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Lombuso Precious Shabalala and Sisa Ngcwangu

This paper aims to present the results of an investigation on how a reciprocal relationship between the University of Mpumalanga (UMP) in South Africa and the surrounding…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the results of an investigation on how a reciprocal relationship between the University of Mpumalanga (UMP) in South Africa and the surrounding communities can be used to accelerate the implementation of sustainable development goal 4 (SDG 4). The aim of this paper is to establish stakeholder perceptions on the role of higher education institutions (HEIs) in the development and implementation of sustainable community engagement (CE) projects geared towards the acceleration of SDG 4.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was adopted. This consisted of a presentation at UMP, an educational tour of the campus and discussion sessions with 3 education officials and 19 high schools representatives from Ehlanzeni District Municipality, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. Content and narrative analysis were used to analyse the data obtained during the discussions.

Findings

The key findings indicate that a reciprocal relationship between HEIs and their surrounding communities can be used to accelerate the implementation of SDG 4 by positioning HEIs to take the lead with initiatives and implementation of CE projects.

Research limitations/implications

For HEIs to be in a better position to take a leading role in CE, they must guide without imposing, else it may lead to stakeholders losing interest.

Practical implications

The importance of a mutual working relationship between HEIs and communities becomes paramount, as it may lead to the realisation and acceleration of SDG 4 through CE. It is suggested that HEIs prioritise CE and also involve communities from the conceptualisation of any project.

Originality/value

The paper raises awareness and demonstrates the importance and possibilities of using CE towards the acceleration of the implementation of SDG 4 by HEIs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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