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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Glenn Finau and Matthew Scobie

The study uses the case of an online-mediated barter economy that proliferated during the COVID-19 crisis to highlight Indigenous notions of barter, trade and exchange.

Abstract

Purpose

The study uses the case of an online-mediated barter economy that proliferated during the COVID-19 crisis to highlight Indigenous notions of barter, trade and exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

A netnographic approach was employed which involved collecting online posts and comments which were stored and analysed in NVivo. This was supplemented with field notes and reflections from authors with an intimate knowledge of the context. These were analysed thematically. The overall methodology is inspired by decolonising methodologies that seek to restore the agency of Indigenous Peoples in research towards self-determination.

Findings

Findings suggest that during and beyond the crisis, social media (a new means) is being used to facilitate barter and determinations of/accounting for value within. This is being done through constant appeals to, and adaptation of, tradition (old ways). Indigenous accounting is therefore best understood as so through Indigenous accountability values and practices.

Originality/value

This paper propose a re-orientation of accounting for barter research that incorporates recent debates between the disciplines of economics and anthropology on the nature of barter, debt and exchange. The authors also propose a re-imagining of accounting and accountability relations based on Indigenous values within an emerging online barter system in Fiji during COVID-19 as “old ways and new means” to privilege Indigenous agency and overcome excessive essentialism.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Akbar Marvasti

The purpose of this paper is to address differences in bartering between markets and firms, as this mode of transaction has become a norm in the broadcasting industry in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address differences in bartering between markets and firms, as this mode of transaction has become a norm in the broadcasting industry in the sale of advertising air time and the purchase of programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data from television stations in the USA is used to investigate the impact of a group of market‐specific and firm‐specific factors on the level of barter advertisement.

Findings

The results from the random effects regressions show that general economic conditions in the national market, such as unemployment and inflation, profitability of the station, and events such as the Olympics and election cycles affect the level of barter among television stations.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to filling a significant void in the empirical microeconomic analysis of barter transaction by providing an example from the broadcasting industry.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Joseph P. Vaccaro and W.W. Kassaye

Provides an examination of the importance of barter in the radio industry based on a systematic random sample of 195 radio stations within the continental USA. Describes…

988

Abstract

Provides an examination of the importance of barter in the radio industry based on a systematic random sample of 195 radio stations within the continental USA. Describes how data were collected to assess the prevalence of barter in the industry. Analyzes the managerial decisions pertaining to barter to provide basic understanding of barter programming and its role in the station manager’s strategic planning. Concludes that station managers are using barter more and more to reinforce their product offerings and reduce the squeeze on cash flow. Providing programming that hits the right people continues to be a challenge for station managers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Sandra M. Huszagh and Fredrick W. Huszagh

Barter and countertrade will be significant trade tools throughout the 1980s. Presently confronted by saturated established markets and debt‐burdened new markets, firms of…

Abstract

Barter and countertrade will be significant trade tools throughout the 1980s. Presently confronted by saturated established markets and debt‐burdened new markets, firms of all sizes in all industry sectors must evaluate these trading approaches. This paper describes the forms of barter and countertrade, products typically traded, markets served, and objectives advanced by each form. The intent is to explore opportunities and problems accompanying each form, so that managers can assess the utilities of these transactions to their firms' international marketing strategies.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Nigel M. Healey

The ‘barter’ of goods (or services) for goods (or services) between companies, either on a bilateral basis or (more usually) via the intermediation of a broker, has been…

Abstract

The ‘barter’ of goods (or services) for goods (or services) between companies, either on a bilateral basis or (more usually) via the intermediation of a broker, has been growing rapidly in recent years. In the United States, barter transactions between US companies amounted to an estimated $9bn in 1995. While historically a US phenomenon, the practice is increasingly spreading to Europe, Asia and Australia. There is now a growing number of so‐called ‘barter exchanges’ operating in Britain and continental Europe. The primary purpose of this paper is to assess the prospects for the development of the British barter exchange industry over the medium to long term. It provides an overview of barter exchanges, examining the US barter exchange industry, which is at a much higher level of development than its British counterpart, in order to identify the way in which the industry operates and the factors which are critical to its growth. It then assesses the prospects for the British barter exchange industry, drawing upon the lessons of the US experience.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2003

Peter Finke

This paper compares the ways in which different livestock and agricultural products are exchanged in post-socialist Mongolia. It tries to explain why some goods are more…

Abstract

This paper compares the ways in which different livestock and agricultural products are exchanged in post-socialist Mongolia. It tries to explain why some goods are more commoditised than others. The hypothesis is that when marketing or barter exchange with professional merchants entail high opportunity costs, the chosen modus will rather be gift giving or personal barter within local networks. High opportunity costs, in turn, may arise because of the importance goods have for domestic consumption, because of the transaction costs connected with their exchange, or because of a high prestige value, which is not reflected in high market prices.

Details

Anthropological Perspectives on Economic Development and Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-071-5

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Tim Slack, Michael R. Cope, Leif Jensen and Ann R. Tickamyer

The purpose of this paper is to analyze data from the first-ever national-level study of informal work in the USA to test two prominent points of focus in the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze data from the first-ever national-level study of informal work in the USA to test two prominent points of focus in the literature: how participation in informal work relates to social embeddedness and formal labor supply. This paper also provides a comparative test of the factors associated with exchange-based informal work (i.e. money/barter) vs self-provisioning activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on data from a national-level household telephone survey and uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression models.

Findings

The data show that participation in the informal economy is widespread in the USA. Consistent with theory, it is found that measures of social embeddedness and formal labor supply are much more salient for predicting participation in informal work for money/barter compared to self-provisioning.

Originality/value

Drawing on unique data from the first national-level household survey of informal work in the USA, this study provides generalizable support for the contention that the informal sector stands as a persistent structural feature in modern society. The results build on the wealth of information produced by qualitative case studies examining informal economic activity as well as a smaller number of regionally targeted surveys to provide important theoretical insights.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Bartering, or compensation trading as it's often known, is flourishing against a background of foreign exchange scarcity and inflation. For many firms, it provides a…

Abstract

Bartering, or compensation trading as it's often known, is flourishing against a background of foreign exchange scarcity and inflation. For many firms, it provides a useful foothold on the markets of Eastern Europe and Latin America, but for those new to the game bartering can be dangerous. Chris Phillips reports.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Rolf F.H. Schroeder

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the Tausch- or barter-centers that existed in Germany during the 1940s. These small but unique platforms for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the Tausch- or barter-centers that existed in Germany during the 1940s. These small but unique platforms for the exchange of consumer durables represent an almost unknown chapter in economic history. This contribution aims to describe the major characteristics of these organizations and to investigate the implications of these findings for community currencies in general.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis is conducted of primary sources, which bring to light different types of these alternative markets. This is complemented by a comprehensive study of secondary sources.

Findings

Theoretically, these exchange systems are interpreted as operating within boundaries. The results of this research project are not only relevant for our understanding of the war and post-war economy in Germany, at a time when the market mechanism was suppressed, this peculiar case also sheds some light on the functioning of markets. Furthermore, a better knowledge of the structure of the Tausch- or barter-centers is relevant with regard to our understanding of the functioning of community currencies in general.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first survey of these organizations.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Sam C. Okoroafo

The increased use of government imposed countertrade (mandated countertrade) by developing nations (LDCs) to meet their economic goals has been of particular concern to…

Abstract

The increased use of government imposed countertrade (mandated countertrade) by developing nations (LDCs) to meet their economic goals has been of particular concern to international executives. Frequently, countertrade can be mandated by LDCs on transactions even with their long‐time trading partners. Firms therefore need to anticipate actions of their LDC trading partners to be competitive in the global market place. Inadequate preparation can result in repercussions such as exclusion from specific deals, to exclusion from a particular country‐market.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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