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Book part
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Mauro Boianovsky

This article provides a detailed investigation of how Lewis revisited classical and Marxian concepts such as productive/unproductive labor, economic surplus, subsistence…

Abstract

This article provides a detailed investigation of how Lewis revisited classical and Marxian concepts such as productive/unproductive labor, economic surplus, subsistence wages, reserve army, and capital accumulation in his investigation of economic development. The Lewis 1954 development model is compared to other models advanced at the time by Harrod, Domar, Swan, Kaldor, Solow, von Neumann, Nurkse, Rosenstein-Rodan, Myint, and others. Lewis applied the notion of economic duality to open and closed economies.

Details

Including A Symposium on 50 Years of the Union for Radical Political Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-849-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra and Ravi Ramamurti

The purpose of this study is to use the rise of emerging-market multinationals as a vehicle to explore how a firm’s country of origin influences its internationalization.

1045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to use the rise of emerging-market multinationals as a vehicle to explore how a firm’s country of origin influences its internationalization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper.

Findings

We argue that the home country’s institutional and economic underdevelopment can influence the internationalization of firms in two ways. First, emerging-market firms may leverage innovations made at home to cope with underdeveloped institutions or economic backwardness to gain a competitive advantage abroad, especially in other emerging markets; We call this innovation-based internationalization. Second, they may expand into countries that are more developed or have better institutions to escape weaknesses on these fronts at home; we call this escape-based internationalization.

Research limitations/implications

Comparative disadvantages influence the internationalization of the firm differently from comparative advantage, as it forces the firm to actively upgrade its firm-specific advantage and internationalize.

Practical implications

We explain two drivers of internationalization that managers operating in emerging markets can consider when facing disadvantages in their home countries and follow several strategies, namely, trickle-up innovation, self-reliant innovation, improvisation management, self-reliance management, technological escape, marketing escape, institutional escape and discriminatory escape.

Originality/value

We explain how a firm’s home country’s comparative disadvantage, not just its comparative advantage, can spur firms its internationalization.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Love

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous…

Abstract

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous literature has emerged embracing debates on the domestic consequences and on the causes of export instability. The purpose here is to examine these debates and an attempt is made to set out different theoretical stances, to classify and examine empirical findings, and to indicate the directions in which the debates have moved. Such a statement of a review article's purpose is, of course, incomplete without more specific delineation of the boundaries within which the general objectives are pursued. Here that delineation has three facets.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Gjeneza Budima

The purpose of this paper is to examine corruption as the most ancient and common type of economic crime, and its significance in a developing country's progress. The…

2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine corruption as the most ancient and common type of economic crime, and its significance in a developing country's progress. The paper seeks to elaborate on why underdeveloped countries are more prone to corrupt acts and more open to investments by criminals. The paper attempts to answer the question whether such criminal activites can be controlled by developing societies and states in transition.

Design/methodology/approach

Research is based on relevant literature and empirical findings, approaching the issue from more than one theoretical point of view. The paper analyses the two faces of corruption when dealing with specific countries and inefficient governments. It discusses how corruption in the long term is damanging for the development of less‐developed states.

Findings

Corruption is not a localized crime but rather a crime without borders. Domestically it can only be controlled through state mechanisms and with the support of society and the media. Internationally it can be controlled with international cooperation and enforcement of bilateral regulations. This research concludes with the importance of global action in fighting economic crimes with destinations in developing countries.

Originality/value

This paper advances the academic debate on economic crimes and countries in transition in particular, while in general presents a more realistic approach to citizens, civil society, the independent media, and state officials themselves, who can have a crucial role in controlling corruption, hence economic crimes.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Stephen O. Oluwatobi

The objective of this chapter is to explain how an innovation-driven economic development model can help to mitigate corruption and facilitate competitiveness in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this chapter is to explain how an innovation-driven economic development model can help to mitigate corruption and facilitate competitiveness in Nigeria.

Methodology/approach

With the use of descriptive narratives, Nigeria was examined in comparison with other countries such as South Korea. The chapter argues that Nigeria has not experienced development as much as South Korea because of her primary dependence on crude oil for economic sustenance.

Findings

Evidence from the statistics showed that innovation-driven economies are more competitive and less corrupt compared to natural resource-driven economies such as Nigeria. Nigeria has performed poorly in terms of competitiveness, transparency, and governance owing to her dependence on natural resources as a major means for economic sustenance.

Originality/value

Helps to explain why an innovation-driven economic development model is the solution to mitigating corruption and facilitating competitiveness in Nigeria.

Details

Beyond the UN Global Compact: Institutions and Regulations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-558-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Jing Sun, Jing Wang, Tao Wang and Tao Zhang

Given the recent rapid economic development, the processes of industrialization and urbanization are accelerating. At the same time, the contradiction between…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the recent rapid economic development, the processes of industrialization and urbanization are accelerating. At the same time, the contradiction between environmental quality and economic development has become increasingly prominent and is likely to restrict the normal pace of China’s economic development and environmental protection. As such, the purpose of this paper is to incorporate the urbanization factor into an analytic framework to discuss the relationship among urbanization, economic development, and environmental pollution.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel data of 31 Chinese provinces from 2004 to 2015 is selected for this research. A spatial correlation test is first conducted on the environmental pollution status, then the spatial Durbin model is used to carry out spatial econometric testing of the relationship among the above three factors.

Findings

Interprovincial environmental pollution in China has significant positive spatial correlation, environmental pollution discharge in most provinces is significantly stable, discharge of environmental pollutants is transitioning from coastal to inland provinces, and urbanization and economic growth can both aggravate environmental pollution, but economic growth can relieve environmental pollution in neighboring provinces.

Originality/value

The relationship between economic growth, urbanization, and environmental quality has always been an important issue for sustainable development. As such, China’s urbanization leads to economic development, while rapid economic growth and environmental pollution are coordinated. This paper focuses on the specific relationship between them. To this end, local governments make concerted efforts to formulate sound environmental regulation policies based on local environmental conditions, where economic development is an effective means of alleviating the contradictory relationship between economic development and environmental protection.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Gao Haiyan

For any developing countries in the 20th century, there exists aproblem of how to choose the economic development route –socialist or capitalist; which means how to…

Abstract

For any developing countries in the 20th century, there exists a problem of how to choose the economic development route – socialist or capitalist; which means how to compare different social and economic benefits and make different value judgements in economic development. Socialism is not a pure political and ideological question, certainly not just a political question. It is a way for developing countries, particularly large agricultural countries, to realise their industrialisation and modern commercial economy. Essentially, it is a focus of development economics. For economically backward countries the aim of socialism is not to fight against the capitalist world, but first to develop their own economy. Socialist public ownership connected with the stage of economic development involves inner contradictions in its own development from the very beginning. We cannot make socialist public ownership perfect without overcoming those contradictions. Public ownership cannot improve social productivity without coming across its own historical limitation. Economic reforms now being practised in China are an effort to improve socialist public ownership: to reform traditional forms of public ownership which have not satisfied the development of productivity. Socialism and public ownership are not features for economically backward countries to flaunt. Neither are they historical trends. They are a way to get rid of poverty, and to realise a modern commercial economy, a way different from the development route of capitalism. There are historical necessity and economic rationality for that kind of socialist public ownership connected with economic development of backward countries. And, of course, socialist public ownership has its own inner contradictions and historical limitations, just like any other kind of ownership in history. It changes and develops continually. Socialist public ownership needs to improve itself, to realise its own development and evolution, and finally to make assets of public ownership the social capital satisfying the demand of highly socialised productivity.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Mehdi Haghshenas

This article has two inter‐related themes. First there is the process of displacement of labour from the subsistence or peasant sector through the impact of mechanisation…

Abstract

This article has two inter‐related themes. First there is the process of displacement of labour from the subsistence or peasant sector through the impact of mechanisation ‐ which creates a “surplus population”. The second theme is that of labour absorption in the subsistence and market sectors and labour underutilisation. The magnitude of the underutilisation problem suggests that growth in the developing countries has followed an uneven profile.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Stergios A. Seretis and Persefoni V. Tsaliki

The purpose of this paper is to expand and further pursue the quest on value transfer in trade. The reason is that the assessment of the cause, the source and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand and further pursue the quest on value transfer in trade. The reason is that the assessment of the cause, the source and the mechanism of value transfer in trade may reveal the rationale upon which the observed and long‐lasting differences in sectoral, regional, and national development records may be justified.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' analysis relies on the concept of free competition as developed by the classical economic tradition and particularly on the notions of regulating capital and dominant technique, whose interface forms the theoretical ground upon which can be confirmed the transfer of values between and within industries and by extension between and within regions and economies.

Findings

It is revealed that the cause of value transfers is capital competition, their source is differential productivity whereas the mechanism for these value transfers is national and international trade.

Practical implications

The analysis provides a theoretical ground upon which a new development policy may be designed which will pay attention to value transfers among sectors, regions and economies.

Originality/value

The paper argues that transfers of value are consummated from the less efficient sectors/economies characterized mostly by low technological achievements to more efficient ones.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Alvaro Bruno Cyrino, Ronaldo Parente, Denise Dunlap and Bruno B. de Góes

This study aims to examine the competitiveness of firms operating in the emerging economy of Brazil. This study examines the current perception of Brazilian business…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the competitiveness of firms operating in the emerging economy of Brazil. This study examines the current perception of Brazilian business leaders regarding the level of competitiveness in various sectors of industrial activity and the country’s business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in a joint study developed by Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration (EBAPE) and the Brazilian Institute of Economics (IBRE). The population surveyed was composed of businessmen, managers and directors of Brazilian manufacturing firms. This survey was created based on a similar survey conducted by the Harvard Business School, which was also aimed at identifying the reasons behind national loss of competitiveness.

Findings

The results of the survey point out that the worsening competitive nature of companies operating in Brazil can be primarily attributed to the deterioration of its country-specific advantages and in particular those linked to government policies, services and bureaucratic procedures, all of which bear a negative impact on the country’s business environment.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore in more depth the specific types of initiatives that these firms have and are continuing to eagerly adopt with the aim of improving their domestic competitiveness and, namely, firm-specific advantages, whether it be by contributing to the improvement of the business environment as a whole, or by improving their own operations and management systems.

Practical implications

The main obstacles related to competitiveness are associated with the “Brazil Cost”, namely, the tax system, infrastructure, political system, labor laws and bureaucracy that do not appear to offer much room for maneuvering in terms of reducing these barriers in the short term. Managers not addressing these important input factors of competitiveness not only divert attention away from innovation and creativity but also could lead to more serious political, social welfare and economic implications in the global marketplace.

Social implications

This study helps to gain a better understanding of the initiatives that could and are being used to contribute to a fruitful discussion about leading public policies and government actions geared toward upgrading Brazil’s business environment and country competitiveness as a whole.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of the initiatives that could and are being used to improve firm competitiveness in Brazil. These initiatives contribute to a fruitful discussion about leading public policies and government actions geared toward upgrading Brazil’s business environment and country competitiveness as a whole.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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