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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Jenna M. Bubna and Pamela Norum

The purpose of this paper is to understand the apparel disposal process and explore, specifically, male disposal through consignment vs donation disposal modes. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the apparel disposal process and explore, specifically, male disposal through consignment vs donation disposal modes. This study hopes to uncover not only the process but the influences that motivate these behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Observations at two sites included conversational interviews with employees as well as consumers disposing apparel through these sites. Collection took place over two months with 26 interviews taking place.

Findings

Themes of seasonal change and financial incentive suggest the use of consignment as a separate process for consumers from donation. Consignment suggested value, while donation was viewed as a habit.

Research limitations/implications

Previous research as well as the findings of this study suggest that apparel donation is similar across genders. They also suggest that consignment is viewed by male consumers as a separate action from donation.

Originality/value

Little to no research has been conducted to understand male apparel disposal, studies on disposal has focused primarily on college-aged females (i.e. Morgan and Birtwistle, 2009). This study adds to a limited body of work to understand the differences and very possible similarities across genders in this behavior.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Ji Young Lee, Holly Halter, Kim K.P. Johnson and Haewon Ju

The purpose of this paper is first, to investigate young consumers' fashion disposition behavior, second, to identify motivations for their fashion disposition, and third…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first, to investigate young consumers' fashion disposition behavior, second, to identify motivations for their fashion disposition, and third, to identify emotional responses experienced during and after the fashion disposition process. The paper also aims to investigate young consumers' ideas about their future fashion disposition practices and to what extent did participants link being socially responsible to their fashion disposition decisions and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted wherein undergraduates wrote an essay concerning their apparel disposal habits. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

Findings

Participants engaged in multiple fashion disposition behaviors including donation, selling, repurposing, and swapping unwanted clothing, Participants mentioned fashionability, physical condition of an item, and social responsibility as factors that prompted their fashion disposition. Participants experienced primarily positive emotions when disposing of unwanted apparel items. In the future, participants indicated a desire to make additional efforts to donate unwanted clothing, repurpose clothing, and to attempt to reduce the amount of clothing they acquired.

Originality/value

By investigating young consumers' fashion disposal, underlying motivations for disposal were identified as well as the need for education on how to dispose of clothing items in socially responsible ways as responses suggested that these young consumers were open to disposing of their unwanted fashion items in a socially responsible manner but did not always have the skill or knowledge to do so.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Anna Perry and Telin Chung

– The purpose of this paper is to understand Eco-Apparel consumption behavior in consumers who care about the environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand Eco-Apparel consumption behavior in consumers who care about the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A snowball sampling technique was used to recruit 16 participants for in-depth interviews.

Findings

Two attitude-behavior gaps existed: the gap between environmental attitude and Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior; and the gap between Eco-Apparel attitude and Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior. There were two connections: product and emotional benefits leaded to Eco-Apparel purchasing behavior; and personal cost benefits, emotional benefits, and economic considerations leaded to Eco-Apparel using and disposing behavior. These gaps and connections suggested participants have certain standards regarding Eco-Apparel consumption. First, the standard of purchasing Eco-Apparel was the same as regular apparel. Second, participants did not want to expend much effort. Third, for some participants, emotional benefits (e.g. fun, good feeling, satisfaction) were important.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size and the snowball sampling technique limit generalization of the study’s findings.

Practical implications

These findings might be of interest to apparel manufacturers and retailers who want to re-enforce consumers’ positive attitudes leading to actual purchase and consumption behaviors.

Originality/value

The current study for the first time examines the attitude-behavior gaps, proposes reasons behind these gaps, as well as connections between benefits and Eco-Apparel usage and disposal behaviors. In addition, the proposed framework is the first attempt to illustrate the relationships among gaps, connections, and consumption standards.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Tanya Domina and Kathryn Koch

A growing sensitivity to environmental issues has stimulated increased consumer recycling of post‐consumer product waste. Post‐consumer textile waste is a largely untapped…

Abstract

A growing sensitivity to environmental issues has stimulated increased consumer recycling of post‐consumer product waste. Post‐consumer textile waste is a largely untapped commodity with strong reuse and recycling potential. This study explored consumer practices regarding textile waste disposal. Findings revealed the use of several textile disposal options with significant relationships between options used and attitudes toward recycling. This research is a necessary precursor to the establishment of organised textile recycling programmes.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Hyun-Mee Joung

The purpose of this paper is to investigate materialistic consumers' apparel purchase, compulsive buying, environmental attitudes, and post-purchase behaviors regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate materialistic consumers' apparel purchase, compulsive buying, environmental attitudes, and post-purchase behaviors regarding hoarding, disposing, and participation in recycling.

Design/methodology/approach

Clothing is used to express the self. Materialistic consumers tend to be young and highly involved with clothing, and purchase compulsively and more than needed. They are more interested in getting possessions than disposing of them. This study was designed to uncover materialistic consumers' post-purchase behaviors. A survey questionnaire was developed and a total of 333 college students completed it in a classroom setting.

Findings

Results of a k-mean cluster analysis suggested two groups (materialistic consumers and non-materialistic consumers). Findings of independent t-tests indicated that materialistic consumers had significantly higher scores for apparel purchase, compulsive buying, value-oriented hoarding, and disposing, but lower scores for environmental attitudes than did non-materialistic consumers. No difference was found in participation in recycling between the two groups.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that marketing media should address benefits and ways to recycle and educate consumers in sustainable consumption behaviors.

Originality/value

Due to the nature of fashion, clothing is easily adopted and quickly becomes obsolete. Consumers easily dispose of clothing, which contributes to the increasing volume of textile waste. Although consumers are encouraged to participate in recycling to protect the environment, little research has focused on clothing post-purchase behaviors. Materialistic consumers' post-purchase behaviors regarding apparel hoarding, disposing, and participation in recycling is a new research area.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Cosette M. Armstrong and Chunmin Lang

There is an inherent conflict of interest between the product developer and the need for improved environmental health, as material consumption in the apparel industry is…

Abstract

There is an inherent conflict of interest between the product developer and the need for improved environmental health, as material consumption in the apparel industry is synonymous with revenue. This paper aims to explore the potential of product service systems (PSS), an emerging business concept in the sustainable design milieu, as a conduit for dematerialization in the apparel industry. The potential to sell fewer material apparel products and more services designed to enhance or support those products is a viable alternative. The authors correlate design attributes that most often lead to the disposal of apparel with PSS concepts, which may dematerialize the supply chain while increasing consumer satisfaction. This discussion also has important implications for design education related to PSS. Thus, a conceptual model is presented to guide such. Apparel products remain important in today's consumer culture. However, PSS may offer a way to maintain this contribution without the harmful byproducts.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Hyo Jung Chang and Kittichai (Tu) Watchravesringkan

Consumers’ environmental behaviours are not only the result of their positive attitudes towards environments, but also different reasons and motivations exist. Thus, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers’ environmental behaviours are not only the result of their positive attitudes towards environments, but also different reasons and motivations exist. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to find out important factors affecting sustainable apparel buying behaviour. Applying the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this study further examines how knowledge about sustainable apparel, perceived money availability, and perceived accessibility to the store influence sustainable apparel consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a purposive college student sample, 235 usable responses were collected to answer the questions. An exploratory factor analysis with principal component analysis was first performed followed by confirmatory factor analysis, and a structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Results revealed that the TPB was successfully applied in the context of sustainable apparel buying behaviour. Furthermore, it was found that consumers’ perceived money availability and perceived store accessibility are important factors that affect control beliefs and sustainable consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This study found the needs of educating college students for contexts of environmental apparel and textiles issues.

Originality/value

Even though previous literature often found the gap between the behavioural intentions and the actual behaviour, this study found the respondents of this study walk their talk. This study successfully applied the TPB to explain consumers’ sustainable apparel buying behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Hye‐Shin Kim and Mary Lynn Damhorst

The study examined how consumers responded to apparel advertisements with varying environmental claims. Respondents were 274 undergraduate students at a US university…

Abstract

The study examined how consumers responded to apparel advertisements with varying environmental claims. Respondents were 274 undergraduate students at a US university. Three attitudinal perceiver variables (environmental knowledge, concern and commitment) were analysed in relation to perceptions of credibility of environmental messages. Although significant differences in perceptions of credibility among certain types of environmental ad claims were found, results suggest that the sample of consumers did not respond more positively to advertisements with environmental messages. Environmental advertisement claims were not effective in generating more positive consumer response to apparel advertisements.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Jessica Hill and Hyun‐Hwa Lee

Conflicting marketing messages have caused consumers to misunderstand distinctions between sustainability and environmental concern, especially when considering the apparel

Abstract

Purpose

Conflicting marketing messages have caused consumers to misunderstand distinctions between sustainability and environmental concern, especially when considering the apparel industry. This study seeks to explore consumers’ actual knowledge and sentiment towards sustainability and environmental issues, both in general and in the apparel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through open‐ended survey questions collected from 80 young Generation Y college students, aged 18‐25.

Findings

Findings show a low level of knowledge of the holistic principle of sustainability and specific adverse effects of the apparel industry. Participants feel steps must be taken towards sustainability, and that every effort helps, despite some skepticism. Results confirm the need for more concise educational and marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

This study sought to provide a snapshot of current young consumers’ attitudes as a tool to encourage more specific and salient directions for future growth of the movement in consumers and companies, adding further insight to the literature on Generation Y as consumers and citizens.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Michelle Childs, Hongjoo Woo and Seeun Kim

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) campaigns have become increasingly popular among fashion apparel brands to reduce environmental impacts of their operations and…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) campaigns have become increasingly popular among fashion apparel brands to reduce environmental impacts of their operations and position themselves as sustainable. In light of attribution theory, this paper aims to investigate how aspects of a CSR campaign affect consumers’ perceptions of brand authenticity, brand attitudes and CSR attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on a 2 (brand image: sustainable vs disposable brand) × 2 (message source: brand website vs news article) between-subjects experimental design with random assignment to conditions and manipulation checks.

Findings

When exposed to messages about CSR campaigns, consumers have more favorable perceptions of brand authenticity, brand attitudes and CSR attitudes for a sustainable brand than for a disposable brand, particularly when consumers view information about a CSR campaign on the brand’s website. However, this is not true for disposable brands when CSR campaigns are promoted through a news source.

Practical implications

Sustainable brands can derive benefits by strategically partnering with causes through CSR campaigns, particularly when their campaigns are promoted through their brand’s website (vs news source). However, brands that offer disposable products (e.g. fast fashion brands) should exercise caution when implementing these campaigns; CSR campaigns may confuse customers as they do not align with the everyday practices of disposable brands.

Originality/value

As the apparel industry faces increased scrutiny for negative impacts on the environment, this study helps to understand whether customers perceive CSR campaigns as trustworthy and authentic, or as ploys aimed at creating more positive brand images.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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