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Michael O’Kane

In recent years there has been much discussion about the relevance of the discipline of anthropology to the various emergent discourses on the environment. Among those…

Abstract

In recent years there has been much discussion about the relevance of the discipline of anthropology to the various emergent discourses on the environment. Among those researching in the area, reason for concern has been confirmed by a failure to make themselves heard as experts over the growing din of the other branches of social research passionately pleading the case for the relevance of their respective disciplines. This is evidenced to some degree by the lack of anthropological literature in the field of environmentalism and comes into stark relief when compared with the extensive treatment of the area given by the political sciences. This chapter seeks to focus on reactions by anthropologists to this dearth of environmentally concerned research within the discipline over the past decade. The debate over the issues raised by this discussion has evolved principally between a small number of dedicated anthropologists, and although it is now spilling out into the wider anthropological community, it is from these scholars work that a path forward has been constructed.

Details

Global Ecological Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-748-6

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Article

Hélène Cherrier, Sally V. Russell and Kelly Fielding

The aim of this paper is to examine the narratives of acceptance and resistance to the introduction of corporate environmentalism. Despite recognition that managers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the narratives of acceptance and resistance to the introduction of corporate environmentalism. Despite recognition that managers and senior executives play a primary role in corporate environmentalism, relatively few researchers have examined how top management supports, accepts, negotiates, disregards, or rejects the implementation of corporate environmentalism within their organization. By considering how members of a top management team reflect on corporate environmentalism the aim is to examine potential identity management conflicts that arise during the implementation of environmentally sustainable initiatives within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted to address the research aims. By taking this approach the paper examines the lived experience of the participants as they internalized corporate environmentalism as part of their identity and as part of the organizational identity. Data collection involved 15 semi‐structured interviews with senior executives and board members of a large Australian hospital.

Findings

Based on an in‐depth thematic analysis of interview transcripts, it was found that individuals attributed a dominant discourse to corporate environmentalism based on their lived experience of organizational change for sustainability. Six dominant discourses were identified. Three were resistant to corporate environmentalism: the pragmatist, the traditionalist, and the observer; and three were supportive of corporate environmentalism: the technocentrist, holist, and ecopreneur.

Originality/value

The findings demonstrate that although top management operated in and experienced the same organizational context, the narratives and identities they constructed in relation to sustainability varied widely. These findings emphasize the challenges inherent in developing an organizational identity that incorporates sustainability principles and the need for change management strategies to appeal to the diverse values and priorities of organizational managers and executives.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Matthew C. Mitchell

Using an institutional theory perspective this paper aims to examine the influence of multinational corporations (MNCs) on host country institutional environments.

Abstract

Purpose

Using an institutional theory perspective this paper aims to examine the influence of multinational corporations (MNCs) on host country institutional environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual piece that introduces the concept of the country institutional profile (CIP) as a useful theoretical framework for analyzing the host country institutional environment.

Findings

The existing model that describes the MNC as a social change agent within host country institutions is extended. This is accomplished by utilizing the CIP as a more formal conception of the host country institutional environment. The model is then used to examine a specific case of the MNC impact on the host country level of environmentalism.

Originality/value

The value of the contribution lies in the application of the CIP for analyzing the host country institutional environment. Furthermore, this framework is applied to the case of the MNC's impact on host country environmentalism.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article

Rameshwar Shivadas Ture and M.P. Ganesh

The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of individual and organisational factors on pro-environmental behaviours of the employees at the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of individual and organisational factors on pro-environmental behaviours of the employees at the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A model explaining pro-environmental behaviours at workplace has been proposed based on contemporary literature related to value-belief-norm (VBN) theory, corporate environmentalism framework and norm. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 20 manufacturing organisations in India and 383 useful individual responses were collected. The proposed model has been tested with the help of structural regression analysis.

Findings

The results of the study show that both individual characteristics as well as organisational efforts influence employees’ pro-environmental behaviours. However, the effect varies as per the type of behaviour. Personal norm mediates the relationship between subjective social norm and two types of pro-environmental behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

An individual faces subjective or objective constraints while exhibiting pro-environmental behaviours. The effect of subjective or the objective constraint needs to be explored in future studies.

Originality/value

To explain pro-environmental behaviours at workplace the authors tested VBN theory, as it was overlooked till date in management literature. It also contributes to the VBN literature by extending it to include organisational variables like corporate environmentalism and social psychological variable like social norm.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Aminu Hassan and Reza Kouhy

– The purpose of this paper is to explore firm–stakeholder environmental accountability relationship in the Nigerian oil and gas industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore firm–stakeholder environmental accountability relationship in the Nigerian oil and gas industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops, from the interdisciplinary literature, a normative framework that links the dominant environmentalism paradigm to the business-firm-causality environmental philosophy. The link is underpinned by the theory of stakeholder identification and salience to enable the identification and evaluation of the importance placed on each environmental stakeholder group by oil and gas companies in the Nigerian oil and gas sector.

Findings

This paper submits that three factors, originating from how these companies identify and classify green stakeholders, lead to little and unimpressive efforts to effectively discharge environmental accountability. These factors include weak, legal powers of regulatory environmental stakeholders; non-recognition of the host communities as powerful environmental stakeholders; and non-recognition of the Nigerian public as legitimate environmental stakeholders.

Social implications

Underestimating the importance of some key, environmental stakeholders and the weak powers of regulatory environmental stakeholders leads to limited commitments to environmental accountability by oil and gas companies operating in Nigeria. Inevitably, this results in persistent conflict, violence, destruction of the oil companies’ properties and other various forms of unrest common in the Niger Delta.

Originality/value

The paper develops a unique normative framework from the relevant literature in environmental ethics, environmental management and environmental accounting that are used to evaluate firms-stakeholder environmental accountability relationship.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 12 no. 4/5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Bokolo Anthony Jnr

This paper aims to investigate the current value chain activities grounded on Porter’s value chain theory and to examine the drivers of strategic environmentalism that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the current value chain activities grounded on Porter’s value chain theory and to examine the drivers of strategic environmentalism that influence sustainable value chain adoption. This study further constructs a prescriptive model to reveal the extent to which information communication technology (ICT)-based industries are adopting sustainable value chain practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using questionnaire from selected ISO 14000/14001-certified ICT-based firms in Malaysia and analyzed using partial least square-structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results reveal that the primary activities positively influence sustainable value chain. Moreover, results indicate that support activities significantly influence sustainable value chain adoption in ICT-based firms. Results further show that strategic environmentalism drivers have an impact on sustainable value chain adoption.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from ICT-based industries in Malaysia only. Additionally, this research extends the body of knowledge and offers theoretical implications for ICT-based industries in Malaysia and other emerging economies in adopting sustainable value chain activities.

Practical implications

Practically, this study assists ICT-based industries to change their current paradigm from the traditional operations to a more holistic approach toward supporting practitioners to simultaneously achieve social responsibility, environmental and economic growth.

Social implications

This study offers social implications for ICT-based industries to implement cleaner operations by decreasing CO2 emission, lessening energy usage, diminishing cost incurred and minimizing usage of natural resources, thereby increasing product recovery and recycle-ability of IT hardware.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to address the issue related to sustainable value chain in ICT-based industry by providing a roadmap on how practitioners can implement sustainable initiatives or more significantly, how to infuse these initiatives in their current chain, while concurrently enhancing competitiveness. Furthermore, this paper examines the current activities implemented by practitioners toward sustainable value chain adoption and explores the correlation of the drivers of strategic environmentalism with regard to sustainable value chain.

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Article

Robert Kudłak

The purpose of this paper is to critically discuss the existing empirical findings of the corporate environmentalism-competitiveness investigations as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically discuss the existing empirical findings of the corporate environmentalism-competitiveness investigations as well as their methodological and cognitive shortcomings.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of the literature was conducted to identify the most seminal and novel studies exploring the relationship between corporate environmentalism and competitiveness. A range of works were selected and their conceptual frameworks, variables and statistical design were obtained and analysed.

Findings

Although existing studies tend to suggest that corporate environmentalism have a positive (or at least neutral) impact on competitiveness, more detailed and critical examination of these studies shows important methodological, cognitive and logical shortcomings, which challenge these findings.

Research limitations/implications

It is not an exhaustive review of all the existing studies, but rather a selection of the most seminal studies which represent different approaches and methodologies applied as well as a variety of empirical findings.

Practical implications

The study challenges the existing empirical findings arguing that corporate environmentalism positively affects a company's competitiveness. The present paper claims that the ultimate conclusion on the relationship can be determined after at least some of the most significant shortcomings are solved.

Originality/value

The study is based on a broad investigation of existing studies, out of which the most seminal and original papers were selected. In addition, the paper offers suggestions for the future empirical investigations.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article

Philip H. Mirvis

Examines the environmental innovations of several progressivebusinesses, including Ben & Jerry′s and the Body Shop, in the areas ofproducts, processes, and campaigns to…

Abstract

Examines the environmental innovations of several progressive businesses, including Ben & Jerry′s and the Body Shop, in the areas of products, processes, and campaigns to save the planet. Discusses how the green consumer market, copy‐cat competitors, infrastructure development, employee motivation, and interorganizational partnerships factor into these firms′ environmental agendas. Pays special attention to why these firms emphasize environmentalism in their business strategy and corporate culture. Reviews some of the value‐laden issues posed by aggressive environmentalism – such as the risks associated with self‐promotion, dominance of one group′s values over another′s, and the durability of environmentalism in the face of business downturns. Closes with a roster of future research questions.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part

Robert J. Mason

Japan’s civic environmentalism combines a tradition of local protest and activism with a national environmental movement that is limited in size and policy influence. A…

Abstract

Japan’s civic environmentalism combines a tradition of local protest and activism with a national environmental movement that is limited in size and policy influence. A strong legislative and administrative response to the country’s severe pollution crisis of the 1960s and 1970s helped tamp down that era’s wave of protests and keep the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) in power. While the state has generally supported local organizations engaged in environmental improvement activities, it has erected barriers that limit the scope of non-governmental organization (NGO) activities and inhibit the development of an influential national environmental movement. The 1990s reforms, inspired in part by the citizen response to the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake, made it easier for NGOs to attain legal status and raise funds. Yet Japan’s civic environmentalism – by most measures – still lags well behind that of peer industrialized countries. The 2011 tsunami and nuclear crisis brought another opportunity for major reforms to the nation’s civic environmental culture – but the evidence to date indicates that the much anticipated transformation is turning out to be of a lesser magnitude than many had initially expected.

Details

Occupy the Earth: Global Environmental Movements
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-697-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000