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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Anthony Beresford and Stephen Pettit

This paper provides a contextualised review of research in the area of humanitarian and emergency relief logistics, providing insights with particular emphasis on lessons learned…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a contextualised review of research in the area of humanitarian and emergency relief logistics, providing insights with particular emphasis on lessons learned. The paper tracks the evolution of research against the development of partner networks and key global events; information was collated and assimilated from cross-cutting themes such as disaster preparedness, emergency response structures and the transferability of commercial-world concepts and principles (such as sustainability) into volatile and fragile environments. It concludes by suggesting possible future challenges which could steer humanitarian response on the ground and will influence the path of academic research going forward.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a general review of work undertaken in the area of Humanitarian Logistics. Use is made of vignettes of case studies in order to provide focus to the discussion and to highlight key issues that emerged from the research reviewed.

Findings

The findings show that there are several new areas of research which will need to be addressed in the humanitarian logistics arena. The discussion demonstrates that research into crisis response is arguably even more important today than it has been previously. Research therefore likely needs to be expanded considerably over the next decade and beyond.

Originality/value

This paper contextualises and synthesises past research into humanitarian logistics responses, highlights key themes and suggests areas for further research.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Dong-Wook Kwak, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, Robert Mason, Stephen Pettit and Anthony Beresford

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or causes of…

3221

Abstract

Purpose

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or causes of failure, how these may interact with each other and how they can be mitigated are imperatives for the smooth operation of international supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to specifically investigate the interactions between international logistics risks within the prevailing structures of international supply chains and highlights how these risks may be inter-connected and amplified. A new dynamic supply chain logistics risk analysis model is proposed which is novel as it provides a holistic understanding of the risk event interactivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies interpretive structural modelling to data collected from a survey of leading supply chain practitioners, in order to analyse their perspectives of risk elements and interactions. The risk elements and their contextual relationship were derived empirically through the use of focus groups and subsequent Delphi study. The two stages of the research rely on experts’ views on risk events and clusters and the level of interactions among those clusters.

Findings

A key finding of this research is that supply chain practitioner’s perception of risk consists of inter-connected four levels: value streams risks; information and relationship risks; risks in international supply chain activities; and external environment. In particular, since level 2 risk creates feedback loops of risks, risk management at level 2 can dampen the amplification effect and the strength of the interactions.

Practical implications

Several managerial implications are drawn. First, the research guides managers in the identification and evaluation of risk events which can impact the performance of their international logistics supply chain operations. Second, evidence is presented that supports the proposition that the relationships with trading partners and LSPs, and the degree of logistics information exchange, are critical to prevent, or at least mitigate, logistics risks which can substantially affect the responsiveness of the international supply chain.

Originality/value

The main contribution to knowledge that this study offers to the literature on supply chain risk management is the development of a supply chain logistics risk analysis model which includes both risk elements and interactions. The research demonstrates the importance of taking into account risk interactions in the process of identification and evaluation of risk events.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Stephen Pettit and Anthony Beresford

Critical success factors (CSFs) have been widely used in the context of commercial supply chains. However, in the context of humanitarian aid (HA) this is a poorly addressed area…

12991

Abstract

Purpose

Critical success factors (CSFs) have been widely used in the context of commercial supply chains. However, in the context of humanitarian aid (HA) this is a poorly addressed area and this paper therefore aims to set out the key areas for research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a conceptual discussion of CSFs as applied to the HA sector. A detailed literature review is undertaken to identify CSFs in a commercial context and to consider their applicability to the HA sector.

Findings

CSFs have not previously been identified for the HA sector, an issue addressed in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The main constraint on this paper is that CSFs have not been previously considered in the literature as applied to HA. The relevance of CSFs will therefore need to be tested in the HA environment and qualitative research is needed to inform further work.

Practical implications

This paper informs the HA community of key areas of activity which have not been fully addressed and offers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of supply chain management in an HA context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Anthony Beresford, Stephen Pettit and Yukuan Liu

This paper aims to analyse available multimodal transport route variations for iron ore shipments from northwest Australia to northeast China, focusing on a major iron and steel…

6966

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse available multimodal transport route variations for iron ore shipments from northwest Australia to northeast China, focusing on a major iron and steel manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is focused on a case study and uses an established cost model as a framework, for the first time, in the context of heavy bulk cargo shipments. Field interviews and a questionnaire form the principal methods of primary data collection. The characteristics of bulk iron ore transport flow are analysed against traditional criteria and an appraisal of the transport infrastructure in north east China is made, considering both road and rail options, and various possible combinations for transport being evaluated. All factors affecting modal choice in the region are examined, including cargo volume, weight, and value, transport distance, transit time, transport costs and schedule reliability.

Findings

The volumes of iron ore moved are large, with a high weight‐to‐volume ratio, and shipments are regular. The research initially confirms that sea and rail transport combinations are the most appropriate for the movement of iron ore. However, where rail transport corridors are congested, provided that the transport distances are not too great, road haulage appears to be an effective substitute and the most competitive multimodal transport route, at least in the short to medium term, is found to be a rail‐sea‐road combination via Port Bayuquan in China.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on the delivery of iron ore to one major steel manufacturer in northeast China; so findings may not be transferable to other companies or circumstances.

Practical implications

The paper first demonstrates that, for heavy, high volume cargoes concentration of flows on to one corridor, perhaps under the control of one service provider, maximises scale economies, but works against competition and route/mode choice. Second, it demonstrates that, for long haul shipments of iron ore, port variations and modal differences for inland transport yield only marginal differences in overall logistics costs.

Originality/value

An assessment of high volume/heavy/low value cargoes such as iron ore has not previously been undertaken using this cost model. This paper therefore provides an original analysis of such supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Ruth Banomyong and Anthony K.C. Beresford

This paper explores the various alternative routes and methods available to garment exporters in Lao PDR, a land‐locked country in South East Asia, when exporting to the European…

8801

Abstract

This paper explores the various alternative routes and methods available to garment exporters in Lao PDR, a land‐locked country in South East Asia, when exporting to the European Union. Lao exporters are dependent on the transport systems in place in neighbouring countries (i.e. Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore) for transit purposes. A multimodal transport cost‐model is used to illustrate and clarify multimodal transport routeing alternatives. A confidence index is also introduced for each route, transport modes and nodal links. Five routeing alternatives are presented in this paper and it is shown that the most frequently utilised route via Bangkok (Thailand) is not necessarily the most competitive in terms of time and cost, while the route via Port Klang (Malaysia) potentially offers a better alternative for Lao garment exporters.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2013

Su‐Han Woo, Stephen J. Pettit and Anthony K.C. Beresford

The changing role of seaports in supply chains has been the subject of extensive research in the recent literature. The strategic development of seaport terminals, responding to…

2941

Abstract

Purpose

The changing role of seaports in supply chains has been the subject of extensive research in the recent literature. The strategic development of seaport terminals, responding to the need for closer integration into supply chains, invites a more detailed examination of the influence of the supply chain structures on seaport performance. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the effects of supply chain structures, especially the degree of integration of seaports into supply chains, on seaport performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The parameters for a structural equation model were identified in the first instance from the supply chain and seaport operations and management literature. The structural equation model itself was then devised, and subsequently refined, using data from Korean seaport terminal operators, shipping companies and freight forwarding companies. The structural equation model was used to assess the level of supply chain integration of seaports and the relationship to port performance.

Findings

The results indicate that the integration of seaports into supply chains has a positive impact on both the effectiveness and the efficiency of seaport performance. In addition, antecedents to seaport supply chain integration are identified; these suggest that a strong orientation to supply chain integration within a port operating company enables the company to adopt and implement a strategy that integrates functions within the port and with other upstream and downstream organisations.

Research limitations/implications

As the field data were geographically limited to one country, extending the findings of this study to other geographical areas may not be possible, although the approach taken, using the structural equation modelling technique, should be transferrable elsewhere. Cross‐validation of the model would widen its applicability to other areas. The paper provides a framework that allows other researchers to examine the level of integration of ports into supply chains.

Practical implications

The potential benefits of closer integration of seaports into supply chains are shown with supply chain integration having a positive effect on port performance. Seaports which do not integrate with their supply chains have a lower level of performance. Thus, enhanced port performance accruing from closer integration would have positive implications both for port and terminal managers and for other supply chain participants.

Originality/value

This study, for the first time, empirically examines the impact of the integration into supply chains of seaports on their performance. This is achieved by the development of a structural equation model which is then tested in the field, thus extending the existing literature which is largely conceptual or descriptive.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Jess Browning

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials, and…

Abstract

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials, and people within the system whether it be from origin to destination; from supplier to customer through the various levels of the supply-chain; or from point to point within the system. Planning for the future focuses on improving a region 's intermodal transportation system efficiencies and infrastructure, its connection to other economies, and on the development of logistics institutions and facilities.

With China 's rapidly developing economy and society, record numbers of new modern facilities such as airports, ports, highways, logistics parks and warehouses are being built. Along with this, companies have made extensive investments in information technologies and software to support the tremendous growth that has taken place in the logistics industry. The development and improvement of China's historic inland water transport system is essential to their continued future growth and prosperity. In Korea, past and present National Governments have emphasized the importance of developing a North East Asian Logistics and Business Hub in their region and have worked on strategies, which include water transport, as part of an important national agenda to that end.

This article looks at how trade flows in the Yangtze and Yellow Sea Regions and between China and South Korea might be enhanced by application of improved shipping methods in marine commerce that will promote economic growth in the region. The application of logistics practices and use of barges is explored for the movement of containers on inland and coastal waterways as well as in short sea shipping which could greatly facilitate the region 's situation with respect to future economic growth.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 June 2007

Peter J. Rimmer

An examination is made of developments in port dynamics since 1965. Initially, this task is addressed by studying changes in past port patterns using a simple descriptive model to…

Abstract

An examination is made of developments in port dynamics since 1965. Initially, this task is addressed by studying changes in past port patterns using a simple descriptive model to accommodate shifts induced by containerization. Over time these changes have led to the reversal of the concentration and centralization of port activities. Then consideration is given to the behavior of stakeholders active in the contemporary port scene by elaborating a bipolar global-local analytical framework through an invocation of the hybrid concepts of glocalization and loglobalization. This analysis leads to an examination of emerging economies to gauge future trends in port dynamics following the dramatic emergence of China. Finally, there is a discussion of the need to go beyond inter-port competition to comprehend global production-distribution networks by exploring synergies between the supply chain and the total transport network to bring out parallels in the hub-and-spoke structure not only underpinning maritime activities but also air transport and telecommunications.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 January 2005

Jess Browning

The Yellow Sea region is becoming an engine of economic growth for Northeast Asia. Its growth and prosperity will depend upon how well it is able to focus on improving the…

Abstract

The Yellow Sea region is becoming an engine of economic growth for Northeast Asia. Its growth and prosperity will depend upon how well it is able to focus on improving the efficiencies of its intermodal transportation system, infrastructure, its connection to other economies and how the system relates to logistics and supply-chain management. The region is moving towards becoming a major world economic hub and the Yellow Sea needs an innovative transportation system to be developed to support the activity that seems destined to take place. This article looks at innovative technologies that might be introduced to develop a more competitive coastal shipping system in the region. Innovations in logistics and container shipping are discussed that could greatly facilitate Incheon’s situation with respect to the broader region.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Glenn Richey

511

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

1 – 10 of 57