Search results

1 – 10 of over 29000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2020

Timo Gossler, Tina Wakolbinger and Christian Burkart

Outsourcing of logistics has great importance in disaster relief. Aid agencies spend several billion US dollars every year on logistics services. However, the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

Outsourcing of logistics has great importance in disaster relief. Aid agencies spend several billion US dollars every year on logistics services. However, the concept of outsourcing has not been established adequately in literature on humanitarian logistics, leading to a fragmented view of the practice. This paper provides a holistic perspective of the concept by constructing a conceptual framework to analyze both practice and research of outsourcing in humanitarian operations. Based on this analysis, we explore future trends and identify research gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a structured review of academic literature, a two-round Delphi study with 31 experts from aid agencies and a complementary full-day focus group with twelve experts from aid agencies and logistics service providers.

Findings

The paper systemizes the current practice of outsourcing in humanitarian logistics according to a conceptual framework of five dimensions: subject, object, partner, design and context. In addition, it reveals ten probable developments of the practice over the next years. Finally, it describes eight important research gaps and presents a research agenda for the field.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review considered peer-reviewed academic papers. Practitioner papers could provide additional insights into the practice. Moreover, the Delphi study focused on the perspective of aid agencies. Capturing the views of logistics service providers in more detail would be a valuable addition.

Originality/value

The paper establishes the academic basis for the important practice of outsourcing in humanitarian logistics. It highlights essential research gaps and, thereby, opens up the field for future research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Expatriate Leaders of International Development Projects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-631-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Terry D. Edwards and Richard Tewksbury

Reports on a US survey of state police (and highway patrol) training academies concerning policies for dealing with AIDS. Finds that although a majority of these…

Abstract

Reports on a US survey of state police (and highway patrol) training academies concerning policies for dealing with AIDS. Finds that although a majority of these organizations have implemented training, fewer agencies have adopted policies informing officers how to deal with HIV/AIDS sufferers, despite the existence of national standards and model policies. Finds that even fewer agencies have policies addressing the employment of staff with HIV/AIDS.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Susan Lee Conway, Patricia Ann O'Keefe and Sue Louise Hrasky

Prior research has investigated legitimation strategies in corporate annual reports in the for-profit sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this phenomenon…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research has investigated legitimation strategies in corporate annual reports in the for-profit sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this phenomenon in an NGO environment. It investigates Australian overseas aid agencies’ responses to criticism of the relief effort following the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. It aims to determine whether voluntary annual report disclosures were reflective of impression management and/or of the discharge of functional accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies content analysis to compare the structure and content of the annual reports of 19 Australian overseas aid agencies before and after the Indian Ocean tsunami.

Findings

Results suggest voluntary disclosure in annual reports significantly increased post-tsunami and was more consistent with impression management activity rather than functional accountability suggesting a response to the legitimacy challenge. The use of impression management tactics differed with agency size, with larger agencies using ingratiation in order to appear more attractive while smaller ones promoted their particular achievements.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution by extending prior impression management and legitimacy literature to an NGO environment. It has implications for the development of these theories as it looks at organisations where the stakeholders are different from the for-profit sector and profits are not the main concern. It raises issues about the concept of accountability in the NGO sector, and how the nature of organisation reporting is changing to address the challenges of a sector where access to funds is highly competitive.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Khan Shahadat

Procurement by executing agencies, statutory organisations or departments in developing countries responsible for procurement against aid‐funded projects, has received…

Abstract

Procurement by executing agencies, statutory organisations or departments in developing countries responsible for procurement against aid‐funded projects, has received little attention from academic researchers. This study found that executing agencies’ buying decisions are primarily influenced by economic criteria, with most emphasis on price and timely delivery. The reliability of the supplier is the next most important aspect. Suppliers need to design their offers to these organisational buyers, with due consideration of these criteria. Along with these, the offer also needs to project the supplier's proven ability to supply quality products.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Ronald D. Francis and Anona Armstrong

The purpose of this paper is to address issues of corruption and governance for international humanitarian organisations (such as Red Cross, Greenpeace, the Salvation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address issues of corruption and governance for international humanitarian organisations (such as Red Cross, Greenpeace, the Salvation Army, and Médecins Sans Frontières). Any such corruption may be both an issue of governance within an organisation as well as an external issue, such as political corruption, with which such organisations must deal in relationships with stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is derived from annual reports, news reports, and published articles.

Findings

A moral basis for operations is based on analysis, information, measuring and reporting.

Research limitations/implications

In‐depth investigations of the ethical performance of humanitarian organisations are required.

Practical implications

The paper addresses issues of analyses of problems, the measurement of effectiveness, the moral dilemmas incurred by aid agencies, and offers some suggestions for improvement.

Social implications

Transparency would encourage greater contributions to the important work undertaken by these organisations.

Originality/value

The moral obligations of humanitarian organisations are usually assessed in terms of their social impacts. This paper suggests that their future viability may also rest on their ability to demonstrate an ethical approach to their operations.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Rie Kijima

Participation in cross-national assessment is becoming a global phenomenon. While there were only 43 countries that participated in the Programme for International Student…

Abstract

Participation in cross-national assessment is becoming a global phenomenon. While there were only 43 countries that participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2000, the number of participating countries/economies has increased to 65 in 2009. To understand this global trend, this chapter seeks to answer the following research questions: What are the real incentives for developing countries to participate in cross-national assessments? What do they gain from actual participation in cross-national assessments, given that there are many constraints and barriers associated with test participation? It employs country-level fixed effects to test the hypothesis that there is a positive association between participation in cross-national assessments and foreign aid to education. This study shows that countries that participate in major cross-national assessments receive, on average, 37 percent more foreign aid to education than countries that do not participate in major cross-national assessments, while holding all other variables constant. Although further research is necessary to make a causal warrant of the association between participation in cross-national assessment and education aid, the results of this study have great implications for developing countries that are considering participating in cross-national assessments.

Details

The Impact of International Achievement Studies on National Education Policymaking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-449-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Liezel Longboan

Studies which look at disaster affected people’s use of communications technologies often fail to take into account people’s communication rights in their analyses…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies which look at disaster affected people’s use of communications technologies often fail to take into account people’s communication rights in their analyses, particularly their right to freedom of expression. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to this issue by exploring the link between freedom of expression, community participation and disaster risk reduction in the use of digital feedback channels offered by aid and government agencies in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnographic fieldwork was undertaken in the Philippines between 2014 and 2015 in Tacloban City and Sabay Island, both in the Visayas, which have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan. A total of 101 in-depth interviews were conducted with affected people, local and national officials, community leaders, civil society groups, telecommunications companies and humanitarian agencies.

Findings

The interviews reveal that majority of disaster-affected Filipinos chose not to engage with formal feedback platforms offered by government and aid agencies out of fear of giving critical feedback to those in authority. They were concerned about the possibility of losing their entitlement to aid, of being reprimanded by government officers, and of the threat to their lives and of their loved ones if they expressed criticism to the government’s recovery efforts. Nonetheless, 15 per cent used backchannels while 10 per cent availed of the formal means to express their views about the recovery.

Research limitations/implications

The paper sought to draw links between people’s lack of engagement with the formal feedback mechanisms offered by government and aid agencies in the wake of Haiyan and the restrictive sociopolitical environment in the Philippines. Further research could be undertaken to examine how freedom of expression plays a role in disaster prevention and mitigation. Research into this area could potentially provide concrete steps to help prevent the occurrence of disasters and mitigate their impacts.

Originality/value

Freedom of expression and its place in disaster risk reduction is rarely explored in disaster studies. The paper addresses this oversight by examining the lack of engagement by communities affected by Haiyan with digital feedback channels provided by aid agencies and government. The findings suggest that despite the provisions for community participation in DRR under the Philippine Disaster Law, people are prevented to express criticism and dissent which puts into question the spirit and purpose of the law.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2016

James H. Williams

Since World War II, the United States has played a leading role in development assistance in both volume of funds and role. Though the largest bilateral development agency

Abstract

Since World War II, the United States has played a leading role in development assistance in both volume of funds and role. Though the largest bilateral development agency, USAID is somewhat of an outlier in modes of operation, scope and nature of activities, and place within government. This chapter examines the development and character of U.S. foreign assistance. Like others, the United States provides foreign aid for multiple reasons – to relieve suffering and promote long-term economic and social development, to gain favor with allies, to open markets, to help ensure national security. Security and diplomacy do play a large role in U.S. foreign aid, even in basic education. In the context of U.S. internal politics, both humanitarian/development and diplomatic/security rationales have been necessary to sustain public and government support for foreign aid. Still neither rationale has prevailed; the budget is split nearly in half. The need for a humanitarian rationale may be characteristic of U.S. foreign assistance along with the emphasis on democracy. Yet these programs have sometimes been distorted by the diplomatic rationale and the security needs of the state. Many of these tensions and the constant need to justify foreign aid likely derive from the perennial periodic isolationist thread of U.S. politics, the particular adversarial institutions of U.S. policymaking, and the transparency which leaves these processes open. Even so, U.S. development assistance has played a prominent role in the trajectory of international development post-World War II, and has worked to address many of the great challenges of the times.

Details

Post-Education-Forall and Sustainable Development Paradigm: Structural Changes with Diversifying Actors and Norms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-271-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

W. Bernard Lukenbill

We all know that the AIDS threat to society is alarming. It is not only a serious health problem but it has become a problem of education and information as well. By the…

Abstract

We all know that the AIDS threat to society is alarming. It is not only a serious health problem but it has become a problem of education and information as well. By the end of 1991, AIDS is predicted to be the second leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease. More people will die from AIDS than from cancers or accidents; and the direct health cost for caring for the estimated 145,000 AIDS patients in 1991 will be between 8 and 16 million dollars.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

1 – 10 of over 29000