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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Espen Solheim-Kile and Andreas Wald

Public–private joint ventures (PPJVs) have a stronger partnership element than standard public–private partnerships (PPPs) but PPJVs are under-researched despite this…

Abstract

Purpose

Public–private joint ventures (PPJVs) have a stronger partnership element than standard public–private partnerships (PPPs) but PPJVs are under-researched despite this important partnership element. This article derives knowledge of incentives and barriers to goal alignment in healthcare PPJVs.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study of the UK’s Local Improvement Finance Trust (LIFT) model including three PPJVs and 34 individual projects was conducted.

Findings

The main economic incentives are future opportunities creating a strong shadow of the future. This is supplemented by social incentives such as the ability to have a social impact. Enlarging the shadow of the future can encourage both parties to think long-term, avoiding short-term opportunism.

Practical implications

PPJV is a promising model for partnership. However, complexity through fragmented public sector partners and the financial structure can create barriers for goal alignment.

Originality/value

This study challenges earlier research studies based on PPJV by providing evidence that the long-term nature of PPJV, especially the potential of new projects, enables the public sector to get more engagement from the private sector.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Torbjørn Bjorvatn and Andreas Wald

With faster innovation and shorter product cycles, time pressure is a highly relevant factor affecting contemporary business processes. This study aims to extend prior…

Abstract

Purpose

With faster innovation and shorter product cycles, time pressure is a highly relevant factor affecting contemporary business processes. This study aims to extend prior research on the effects of velocity at the firm level by considering the effect of time pressure on knowledge transfer effectiveness (KTE) on the team level and the role of trust as a mediator of this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

We empirically assess the impact of time pressure on knowledge transfer effectiveness in teams. Further, we test the mediating effect of trust on this relationship. We study a sample of 285 project teams applying partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The authors find that time pressure is negatively associated with KTE. Moreover, trust among team members has a complementary mediating effect on this relationship. Thus, while trust is urgently needed for enhancing KTE under time pressure, time pressure reduces trust-building too.

Research limitations/implications

This study establishes empirically the importance of time pressure and trust as drivers of KTE in teams. The contribution connects the field of knowledge management to important streams in the wider business literature: organization studies, management, strategic management, project management, innovation etc. Whereas the model is parsimonious, it has high explanatory power and high generalizability to other contexts.

Practical implications

Team managers should take care to allow enough time for knowledge transfer within the team. This is particularly important when knowledge sharing is central, e.g. in innovation, development and change processes. If this is not possible, measures should be taken to maintain trust among team members.

Social implications

Effective knowledge management enhances the performance of business entities and public-sector organizations alike. Today, both the private and public sectors are under considerable pressure to increase both efficiency and effectiveness. Effective knowledge transfer within teams is a core capability to achieve this goal. More effective organizations result in more competitive private firms, more employment opportunities and improved public services to citizens.

Originality/value

Time pressure is an increasingly relevant factor in contemporary business but so far little explored in research. This study extends current knowledge by considering the effect of time pressure on KTE.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Jonathan Mukiza Kansheba and Andreas Erich Wald

This study examines the mediation effects of entrepreneurial attitudes (EAs) on the nexus of the entrepreneurial ecosystem (EE) quality and productive entrepreneurship for…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the mediation effects of entrepreneurial attitudes (EAs) on the nexus of the entrepreneurial ecosystem (EE) quality and productive entrepreneurship for early-stage and high-growth entrepreneurial activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs global entrepreneurship monitor (GEM) panel data of 137 economies from 2014 to 2018. Random effect panel regressions and relative effect size estimations were used for data analysis.

Findings

The study’s findings show complementary mediation effects suggesting that EE quality steers entrepreneurial activities via the EA. However, such mediation is much more vivid towards high growth than early-stage activities. Vibrant EEs provide necessary resources that boost the attitude of potential and nascent entrepreneurs to engage in early stage and high-growth entrepreneurial activities.

Research limitations/implications

The study utilizes GEM data to explain the EEs and EA dynamics and their related effects on entrepreneurship at the macro level. Future research may study the phenomena by using micro level data.

Originality/value

The paper explores a less empirically researched question on how EEs steer entrepreneurship growth and development. It reveals a need for new perspectives/logics (e.g. mediation/moderation) for improving the explanations on the extant EEs framework. It further informs policymakers and practitioners to design entrepreneur-centred EE policies and programs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Kalanit Efrat, Andreas Wald and Shaked Gilboa

Serial crowdfunders are vital to the advancement of crowdfunding, either by launching subsequent campaigns or by mentoring novice (first-time) crowdfunders. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Serial crowdfunders are vital to the advancement of crowdfunding, either by launching subsequent campaigns or by mentoring novice (first-time) crowdfunders. However, research on crowdfunders’ drivers has focused on either novice crowdfunders’ motivations or the factors contributing to serial crowdfunders’ success. The present study aims to complement existing knowledge on serial crowdfunders by exploring behavioral and well-being aspects that drive novice crowdfunders to become serial crowdfunders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on crowdfunders were retrieved through in-depth interviews with 42 novice and 17 serial crowdfunders on a list provided by the largest crowdfunding platform in Israel. Complementary data were collected from interviews with the chief executive officers (CEOs) of two leading rewards and donations platforms in Israel and from the contents of the pages of crowdfunding campaigns. A four-stage process of content analysis was applied.

Findings

Novice and serial crowdfunders follow different logics. While novice crowdfunders’ motivations and behavior can mostly be explained by the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and follow a more rational process, serial crowdfunders’ motivations and behavior are guided by aspects of well-being.

Originality/value

The findings show that the more rational process described by the TPB and the dimensions of well-being interacts in a circular way to motivate serial operations by crowdfunders. Well-being is also manifested in the maintenance of social ties and the development of social capital, which are crucial for serial entrepreneurs.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2018

Bertrand Pauget and Andreas Wald

Research on organizational innovation remains relatively scarce, particularly with respect to social structures and processes. In contrast to product innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on organizational innovation remains relatively scarce, particularly with respect to social structures and processes. In contrast to product innovation, organizational innovation relies more on informal processes and relationships among members of the organization than on formal processes. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of these processes at the micro level.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a process model of organizational innovation, the authors study the case of a dermatology department of a large hospital in France and conceptualize organizational innovation as the outcome of a social system represented by networks of relationships, professional identities and formal structures.

Findings

The findings suggest that informal networks support the early phase of the invention and development of organizational innovation. However, the later phases depend more on the formal structure. A mismatch between professional identities and formal roles and positions can prevent the institutionalization and legitimation of organizational innovation in the final phases of the innovation process.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to one case, a department in a French hospital. The authors call for future research to study different industry/country contexts.

Practical implications

Professional organizations such as hospitals should encourage better interactions between actors of different professional identities to support the development and implementation of organizational innovation. Reducing the perceived hierarchy of different professional identities may also be useful.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate micro-level processes in organizational innovation by combining the concept of professional identity and network analysis.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Kalanit Efrat, Shaked Gilboa and Andreas Wald

The current study explores the emergence of well-being, a fundamental human goal, in the crowdfunding process by investigating entrepreneurs and backers' interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study explores the emergence of well-being, a fundamental human goal, in the crowdfunding process by investigating entrepreneurs and backers' interactions within reward and donation campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on interviews with 64 entrepreneurs and 50 backers of rewards and donation campaigns.

Findings

The analysis revealed that the crowdfunding experience triggers all three aspects of well-being––hedonic, eudaimonic and social––for both entrepreneurs and backers. These aspects emerged in the course of the campaign's life stages.

Originality/value

The study establishes well-being as a core aspect of entrepreneur–backer interaction and shows how entrepreneurs' well-being feeds back into backers' well-being and vice versa. Furthermore, it illustrates how well-being, in its various aspects, develops during the different stages of the crowdfunding process to facilitate a full well-being experience and a sense of accomplishment for both types of participants.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Jonathan Mukiza Peter Kansheba and Andreas Erich Wald

The emerging concept of entrepreneurial ecosystems has captured the attention of scholars, practitioners and policymakers. Although studies on entrepreneurial ecosystems…

Abstract

Purpose

The emerging concept of entrepreneurial ecosystems has captured the attention of scholars, practitioners and policymakers. Although studies on entrepreneurial ecosystems continue to grow, their contributions are still disintegrated. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of extant literature on entrepreneurial ecosystems and to develop a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study deployed a systematic literature review of 51 articles obtained from three comprehensive databases of Web of Science, Google Scholar and Scopus. The analysis includes two phases. First, a descriptive account of research on entrepreneurial ecosystems and second, a content analysis based on a thematic categorization of entrepreneurial ecosystems research.

Findings

The findings show that the concept of entrepreneurial ecosystems is both under-theorized and it has been recently dominated by conceptual studies. The focus of empirical research is on technology-based industries in Western economies using cases studies as methodological approach.

Research limitations/implications

This review contributes to the body of knowledge on entrepreneurial ecosystems research by providing a systematic review following a thematic grouping of extant research into antecedents, outputs and outcomes of entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Originality/value

It reveals existing theoretical and empirical gaps in research as well as offering avenues of future research on entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2019

Martin Esch, Mike Schulze and Andreas Wald

The purpose of this paper is to link the fields of research on strategic decision (SD) making and integrated reporting (IR) and advances knowledge of the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link the fields of research on strategic decision (SD) making and integrated reporting (IR) and advances knowledge of the concept of integrated thinking by describing how financial information and non-financial environmental, social and governance (ESG) information are used in different phases of the strategic decision-making process (SDMP).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 15 senior executives from twelve different industries were asked about the importance of different types of information within SDMPs. The data were analyzed by means of content analysis.

Findings

The authors derive a four-phase model and explicate the utilization of financial information and non-financial ESG information within each phase. The findings show that both types of information affect SDMPs, but the importance of each type differs among the phases.

Practical implications

This study offers practitioners a yardstick against which to compare how they use different types of information throughout the SDMP.

Originality/value

This paper provides a conceptual model of integrated thinking in SD making by connecting two separate fields of research. This connection will permit deeper study of the field of information and its implications for SD making. The present investigation shows that IR can promote integrated thinking in companies, as the broader range of information at hand allows companies to form a holistic picture of internal management questions and incorporate information that has not been previously prepared or associated with existing information.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Jan Christoph Munck, Alexander Tkotz, Sven Heidenreich and Andreas Wald

The study builds on existing research in management control (MC) and innovation management. The purpose of this study is to identify patterns in the application of MC…

Abstract

Purpose

The study builds on existing research in management control (MC) and innovation management. The purpose of this study is to identify patterns in the application of MC instruments which contribute to successful innovation. The application of MC instruments can reduce potential risks and make the new product development (NPD) process more transparent and efficient.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use dyadic data to determine the effect of 58 MC instruments on NPD process stage-specific performance and subsequent innovation and firm success. To provide empirical evidence of each MC instrument’s effectiveness, three importance-performance matrix analyses were conducted that assess the impact of each MC instrument.

Findings

The authors identify patterns in the application of MC instruments which contribute to successful innovation activities and the authors determine the impact of MC instruments on NPD performance, innovation performance and firm performance in different stages of the NPD process.

Practical implications

The authors provide knowledge that can be used by managers to review their actual application of MC in the NPD process and to select their instrument set.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the MC literature by examining data from a cross-industry study on the effects of MC instruments during the NPD process. The authors include a comprehensive set of MC instruments and show how their effect changes between the different stages of the NPD process.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Philipp Lill, Andreas Wald and Jan Christoph Munck

The number of theoretical and empirical research on management control of innovation activities has significantly increased. Existing studies in this field are…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of theoretical and empirical research on management control of innovation activities has significantly increased. Existing studies in this field are characterized by a wide dispersion and a multitude of different definitions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review of the literature on management control of innovation activities and to synthesize the current body of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a systematic review approach, this article reviews 79 articles on management control for innovation activities from 1959 to 2019 and inductively derives a multi-dimensional framework.

Findings

The review of existing studies advances the debate about the detrimental versus beneficial character of management control systems for innovation, showing that the repressing character of control is not inherent to control itself, but emanates from the design of the respective management control system.

Research limitations/implications

The multi-dimensional framework connects and combines existing research and thus synthesizes the current state of knowledge in this field. Additionally, the framework can guide practitioners to systematically assess context factors and consequences of their management control systems design, and it shows avenues for future research.

Originality/value

The scientific and practical value of this paper is the convergence of the current body of knowledge consisting of various definitions and conceptualizations and the identification of avenues for future research.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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