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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Larraine Gooch

Sets out to look at the career experiences of women in personnel. Asurvey was undertaken of 149 women studying for examinations leading tomembership of the Institute of…

Abstract

Sets out to look at the career experiences of women in personnel. A survey was undertaken of 149 women studying for examinations leading to membership of the Institute of Personnel Management. The results show that the issues facing women in personnel were the same as those facing other women in organizations. Women in personnel face a glass ceiling around Personnel Officer level. In addition, however, these women identified that the personnel role often lacked status in organizations and that the qualities they possessed, which had attracted them into the personnel profession, were not particularly valued in organizations. However, with the take‐up of human resource policies and the emphasis on “people skills” women in personnel could be in a key position to capitalize on the changing needs of organizations and play an important role in the process. In order to ensure that women in personnel have equality of opportunity, there is a need for positive action from the top of organizations, from the Institute of Personnel Management and from women in personnel themselves.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

John Henstridge

The paper suggests that traditional descriptive approaches to Personnel Management do not successfully answer the question ‘what is Personnel Management?’, nor do they…

Abstract

The paper suggests that traditional descriptive approaches to Personnel Management do not successfully answer the question ‘what is Personnel Management?’, nor do they explain the way in which it actually exists in work organizations. A framework for analysis is proposed, looking at work organizations from the perspective of the Personnel Manager; it is suggested that this framework may help to answer some of these questions, provide a means of exploring the phenomenon of Personnel Management and also of studying it as a subject and a meeting point of disciplines.

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Personnel Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Laura Hall and Derek Torrington

The information on which this article is based comes from a major piece of research on the changing nature of personnel management, which is being conducted by the authors…

Abstract

The information on which this article is based comes from a major piece of research on the changing nature of personnel management, which is being conducted by the authors and Lesley Mackay at UMIST. The work is being funded by the Leverhulme Trust in collaboration with the IPM. The first phase of the research was the completion of extensive and detailed questionnaires about personnel practice in 350 different establishments during the Spring and early Summer of 1984. That data are still being analysed, but the second stage of the research began at the end of 1984. This is a series of interviews with questionnaire respondents. Conclusions from the research will be published progressively until the end of 1986.

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Personnel Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

J.T. Akinmayowa

This research investigates the relationship between personnel managers and other managers in the organisation. The evidence reported in this study demonstrates that…

Abstract

This research investigates the relationship between personnel managers and other managers in the organisation. The evidence reported in this study demonstrates that personnel managers, in the main, perceived themselves to be in the forefront with other professionals in contributing to corporate success, whereas managers in sales, finance and production departments have a less impressive view of personnel managers' influence in achieving corporate goals. However, they recognised the importance of personnel managers and their functions in the organisation per se.

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Personnel Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1986

R.A. Hamilton

The computer systems developed during the 1960s and 1970s made very little impact on management decision. Management Information System design was constrained by three…

Abstract

The computer systems developed during the 1960s and 1970s made very little impact on management decision. Management Information System design was constrained by three factors — the technology was large‐scale and inevitably centralised and controlled by data processing staff; the systems were designed by specialist staff who rarely understood the business requirements; and managers themselves had little knowledge or “hands‐on” experience of computers. In the 1980s a greater awareness of the need for planning and better use of personnel information, coupled with the development of distributed processing systems, has presented personnel management with opportunities to use computing technology as a means of increasing the professionalism of practising personnel managers. Effective use will only occur if the implementation of technology is matched by appraisal of skills and organisation within personnel departments. Staff will need a minimum level of computing expertise and some managers will need skills in modelling, particularly financial modelling. The relationship between personnel and data processing needs careful redefining to build a link between the two and data processing staff need to design and communicate an end‐user strategy.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 86 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Shaun Tyson

This paper describes part of a research project into personnel management as an occupation, and argues for the study of personnel managers in the context of the…

Abstract

This paper describes part of a research project into personnel management as an occupation, and argues for the study of personnel managers in the context of the organisations in which they work. The research draws on Kelly's personal construct theory by examining the way 20 personnel specialists in four organisations interpret and make meaningful the roles of others encountered in their working world. These ‘interpretations’ or constructs were discovered by using a repertory grid technique, and the results are compared between each of the four organisations. Some possible explanations are offered of the ways in which the personnel specialists studied cope with values that conflict with their own, and of how they are able to integrate within their organisations' cultures.

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Personnel Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

John W. Leopold and P.B. Beaumont

The authors discuss the typology of personnel officers in the National Health Service. On the basis of a survey of Scottish Health Boards they conclude that NHS personnel

Abstract

The authors discuss the typology of personnel officers in the National Health Service. On the basis of a survey of Scottish Health Boards they conclude that NHS personnel officers are “insiders” rather than “outsiders” bringing their specialist skills from elsewhere.

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Employee Relations, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Ian Clark and Tim Clark

It has recently been argued that the use of external consultants isindicative of a crisis in personnel management. However, the use ofconsultants, of whatever type, has…

Abstract

It has recently been argued that the use of external consultants is indicative of a crisis in personnel management. However, the use of consultants, of whatever type, has not been adequately explained for a number of reasons. The reasons underlying the increasing usage of external consultants by personnel is a form of defence, allowing it to shed some activities thereby strengthening its position within the organisation. To illustrate this argument the reasons for the growth in the use of a particular type of consultant by personnel – executive recruitment consultancies – are considered. The results reported draw on two major surveys. The first was directed at executive consultancies whereas the second was directed at corporate personnel directors in the Times 100 companies. Response rates of 42 per cent and 55 per cent were achieved.

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Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Laura Hall and Derek Torrington

On the basis of studies of 35 personnel managers who had introducedcomputerisation and a detailed comprehensive case study of theintroduction of computerisation into the…

Abstract

On the basis of studies of 35 personnel managers who had introduced computerisation and a detailed comprehensive case study of the introduction of computerisation into the personnel function, the factors that differentiate adoptors into the categories of “Stars”, “Radicals”, “Plodders” and “Beginners” are analysed. The critical role of the personnel manager in facilitating successful adoption, the role of the computer in changing the shape of the personnel function, its power and professionalisation are considered, and finally the challenges it will present for the personnel department in the future.

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Personnel Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Lynn Ashburner

In many organisations, changes in organisationalstructure and the introduction of technology areoccurring simultaneously, impacting uponpersonnel in many different ways…

Abstract

In many organisations, changes in organisational structure and the introduction of technology are occurring simultaneously, impacting upon personnel in many different ways. The process of such changes, how they interrelate and how they affect personnel are discussed, through examining some of the findings of a recent research project. It is argued that the interrelating developments of decentralisation, line management access to the personnel database and the use of IT not only affects the relationship of the personnel function to the line but also strengthens the position of management in relation to the workforce. Benefits brought by the introduction of computerised personnel systems are related to organisational culture, i.e. the existing status of the personnel function within the organisation and the structure of the organisation, rather than the extent of the use of computers within it.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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