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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2017

Rayman Mohamed, Robin Boyle, Allan Yilun Yang and Joseph Tangari

There is a resurgence in the adaptive reuse of buildings. However, there is a lack of literature that pulls all the strands of adaptive reuse together. Furthermore…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a resurgence in the adaptive reuse of buildings. However, there is a lack of literature that pulls all the strands of adaptive reuse together. Furthermore, despite claims that it is motivated by the 3 Es of the sustainability triangle, the authors could find no research that critiques adaptive reuse from this perspective. The purpose of this study is to review the literature to collect pertinent information in a single place and to critically examine whether adaptive reuse incorporates the 3 Es of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach of this study is a literature review and a critical analysis of the practice of adaptive review.

Findings

Adaptive reuse is concentrated at the environment and economic development corners of the sustainability triangle. There are positive interactions along this edge. The authors attribute this to the fact that the same actors – the private and public sectors – are located at both corners of the triangle, and they have shared interests. This is different from the wider sustainability literature, where major actors at each corner are different and tensions along each edge are resolved through mediation. In adaptive reuse, there are no actors at the equity corner of the triangle, and there are minimal attempts to address concerns along the equity–environment and equity–economic development edges of the triangle.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the USA.

Practical implications

This study suggests policy interventions that address the equity issue in adaptive reuse.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide a succinct review of contemporary adaptive reuse and that places the practice within the framework of the 3 Es of sustainability.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Mohammad B. Hamida and Mohammad A. Hassanain

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the effective implementation of adaptive reuse projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed approach of qualitative and quantitative techniques was followed in the development of the framework model. A literature review was conducted to comprehend the processes involved in adaptive reuse projects. In total, 90 AEC/FM practitioners were surveyed to identify the current practices in these projects. A generic framework model was then developed to standardize the processes involved, using integration definition for function modeling process modeling methodology. Face-to-face interviews with a targeted group of 30 AEC/FM practitioners were conducted, to validate the developed framework model, by assessing the importance and the frequency of implementing each function in the developed framework model.

Findings

The framework model consisted of four sequential processes, namely, assess the feasibility of the adaptive reuse project, design the adaptive reuse project, construct the adaptive reuse project and operate and maintain the adaptive reuse project. The validation confirmed the importance of all the framework functions and the frequency of their implementation.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature and the AEC/FM professions, through developing a lifecycle and knowledge-oriented framework model for building adaptive reuse. The framework presents clear documentation of adaptive reuse processes. Thus, it holds the potential of endeavoring on adaptive reuse projects to be more efficient.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Waleed Tarek Ali Shehata, Yasser Moustafa, Lobna Sherif and Ashraf Botros

Many of the heritage adaptive reuse projects in Islamic Cairo did not report success. Existing evaluations are usually drawn from a singular perspective – such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Many of the heritage adaptive reuse projects in Islamic Cairo did not report success. Existing evaluations are usually drawn from a singular perspective – such as preservation and sustainability. The purpose of this paper is to generate a comprehensive assessment framework of adaptively reused heritage buildings that is specifically developed for the case of Islamic heritage of Cairo.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper depends on an extensive literature review about primary goals of adapting heritage for reuse. Related to each goal, multiple criteria of assessment are derived from literature, and then explained to mention worldwide benchmarks in that field.

Findings

A successful heritage adaptation project shall aim to achieve: building preservation, success of new function, and local community development. The framework is able to organize the adaptive reuse literature in general, and to specifically provide direct goals and guidelines in the case of Cairo.

Research limitations/implications

In research and practice, priorities of heritage reuse vary from case-to case; however, this paper considers all assessment criteria to be of equal importance.

Practical implications

In order to apply and technically develop this assessment framework, future research can describe methodologies for assessment and to set optimum quantitative and/or qualitative indicators’ thresholds for each criterion.

Social implications

This paper highlights that new uses of heritage buildings should be assessed for having a role in the upgrading the socio-economic milieu of the people living. The new functions shall act as a stimulant for economic upraising and social reinforcement for the local business and small traditional industries.

Originality/value

The framework can be used as a checklist in either the planning of adaptive reuse projects or the evaluation of already completed ones. The framework shall assist governmental institutions, developers, owners, community groups, practitioners, and others in bringing forward successful adaptation schemes in Cairo.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2021

Mohammad B. Hamida and Mohammad A. Hassanain

This paper investigates the current practices of adaptive reuse projects, within the context of architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management (ACE/FM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the current practices of adaptive reuse projects, within the context of architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management (ACE/FM) industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed research methodology, combining qualitative and quantitative techniques, was followed. Literature review was performed to comprehend various aspects pertaining to building adaptive reuse. Three questionnaire surveys were administered on 90 AEC/FM practitioners, to investigate the current practices of adaptive reuse projects in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire surveys were directed to 30 architects/engineers (A/Es), 30 contractors and 30 facilities managers, respectively, through face-to-face interviews. The qualitative and quantitative findings of each questionnaire survey were analyzed. Recommendations were proposed for each of the professional domains, to enhance the overall AEC/FM performance in future adaptive reuse projects.

Findings

The findings pointed out the necessity of accurately planning and designing the adaptive reuse in accordance with the spatial, technical, legislative, economic and functional considerations. The findings revealed the significance of contractors' role in conducting effective supervision over the managerial and technical processes during the implementation of the change of use. It also indicated the importance of the facilities managers' role in performing all daily operational activities, to maintain satisfactory performance of the adaptively reused buildings.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the relevant literature to the building adaptation, through investigating the perspectives of AEC/FM practitioners on adaptive reuse projects. The findings would enable AEC/FM practitioners to improve their professional practices in future adaptive reuse projects, in an integrated manner.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sarah Hill

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address the complexity of developing heritage assets and encourage more responsible and responsive treatment of heritage assets. The purpose of the model is to visually articulate the various elements that must be considered to successfully develop a heritage asset.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on six years of observation and industry practice, the model reflects a previously undocumented process for developing and adapting built heritage assets employed by many professionals across the UK. The model is further strengthened by drawing from other international theories, concepts, and principles.

Findings

The redevelopment of heritage assets is a “wicked problem”. The model established visually articulates current good practice in the field and provides a simplified version of the process.

Originality/value

Presently, there is insufficient contemporary literature which adequately describes or visualizes the complex adaptive reuse of built heritage in a coherent and holistic way. This model is the first to try to visually capture and communicate current good practice for widespread use. It is hoped that the documentation and dissemination of this process will help to advance creative problem solving, increase the appeal of developing heritage assets and elevate the quality of work produced.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Nicholas John Clarke, Marieke Cornelie Kuipers and Job Roos

The purpose of this paper is to explore the conceptualisation of the Smart Sustainable City (SSC) with new concepts of resilience thinking in relation to urgent societal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the conceptualisation of the Smart Sustainable City (SSC) with new concepts of resilience thinking in relation to urgent societal challenges facing the built environment. The paper aims to identify novel methodologies for smart reuse of heritage sites with a pluralist past as integral to inclusive urban development.

Design/methodology/approach

SSC concepts in the global literature are studied to define a new reference framework for integrated urban planning strategies in which cultural resilience and co-creation matter. This framework, augmented by UNESCO’s holistic recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL), was tested in two investigative projects: the historic centre of South Africa’s capital Tshwane and the proximate former Westfort leprosy colony.

Findings

The research confirms that SSC concepts need enlargement to become more inclusive in acknowledging “cultural diversity” of communities and engaging “chrono-diversity” of extant fabric. A paradigm shift in the discourse on integrated urban (re)development and adaptive reuse of built heritage is identified, influenced by resilience and sustainability thinking. Both projects show that different architectural intervention strategies are required to modulate built fabric and its emergent qualities and to unlock embedded cultural energy.

Originality/value

Together with a critical review of SSC concepts and the HUL in relation to urban (re)development, this paper provides innovative methodologies on creative adaptation of urban heritage, reconciling “hard” and “soft” issues, tested in the highly resilient systems of Tshwane.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Are Thorkildsen and Marianne Ekman

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot in a national R&D programme in Norway (2007-2010) to join the ongoing discussion on the different meanings and uses of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot in a national R&D programme in Norway (2007-2010) to join the ongoing discussion on the different meanings and uses of planning tools and approaches in cultural heritage across various disciplines. The study aimed to reveal how patterns of collaborative planning processes unfold in a complex cultural heritage setting, the key challenges, dilemmas and tensions in the different phases of the process and implications for future research and policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal explorative dialogic action research was undertaken to investigate and capture the evolution of knowledge-creating processes. The qualitative data collection methods included 25 semi-structured interviews, focus group interviews, participatory observation and text and document analysis.

Findings

Experiential R&D activities can bridge and transcend the context-specific tensions that separate the involved actors and their activities. Furthermore, a pro-active cultural heritage authority is required at the national level to maintain supportive links to the local level, and it is necessary to manage and prevent potential opportunistic action from negatively affecting cultural heritage sites and processes.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study approach makes generalising beyond the current study difficult. However, the findings raise relevant issues for further research on the management of cultural heritage policy from a sustainable development perspective.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the need to study the evolving processes of linking cultural heritage, sustainable development and collaborative planning, as well as the dynamic relationship between the national, regional and local levels of heritage management.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Ali Alqahtany and Sreejith Aravindakshan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the trajectories of the urbanization process in Saudi Arabia in its regional context from the unification of the country by King…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the trajectories of the urbanization process in Saudi Arabia in its regional context from the unification of the country by King Abdul Aziz Al Saud in 1932 to the present time, and the urbanization impact on the status and management of cultural heritage in the Kingdom.

Design/methodology/approach

Our study design integrated a well-articulated theoretical frame of sustainability to gain a heuristical understanding of urbanization in Saudi Arabia, and its link to cultural heritage. The methodological approach was mixed in nature involving (1) literature search and review, (2) analysis of public documents and databases, (3) analysis of photographs and (4) expert interviews.

Findings

One of the most obvious findings reached in this study is that there is considerable trade-off between heritage site conservation, population and economic demand for increased urbanization. Hence, with increasing urbanization pressures, the value of the heritage site may be rethought based on Saudi Arabia's economic and cultural conservation perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

Since our data are mostly of textual narrative in origin, precise predictions were difficult or impossible for many reasons such as non-linearity, and non-equilibrium dynamics, context and scale dependence as well as the historical exigency of urbanization. However, the same theoretical framework can be applied to appropriate longitudinal/ time series data for predictive analyses, which can be taken up as a future research agenda.

Originality/value

This paper analyzes the urbanization process and sustainability challenges of cultural heritage sites employing a mixed methodological approach, embedded in a holistic theoretical framework of sustainability.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Visar Hoxha

The purpose of this paper is to study the sustainable impact of adaptive reuse of shopping malls built during communism in Kosovo.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the sustainable impact of adaptive reuse of shopping malls built during communism in Kosovo.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses qualitative research using semi-structured interviews with architects, civil engineers, real estate developers and facility managers.

Findings

The study found that it is the predominant opinion of respondents that the economic impact of adaptive reuse of old shopping malls in Kosovo is reflected through extension of useful life of the malls, lower cost of reuse vs demolition, economic and tourism development of the neighborhood, job creation and increase of property prices in the surrounding area. In addition, the study found that it is the predominant opinion of respondents that by adaptive reuse of old shopping malls, the revitalization and social dynamism of the surrounding area will be improved and collective memory and identity of these shopping malls will be extended, including the increased traffic, space utilization and security. The study concludes that operational CO2 emission of the old shopping malls will be reduced after their sustainable adaptation and also the embodied energy of the building materials will be reused.

Research limitations/implications

The study has several implications. For real estate developers, it shows that is less costly to adapt and refurbish rather than redevelop. For authorities, it shows that by adapting old communist shopping malls, they would extend the collective memory of those locations, improve the social life and utilization of public spaces in the surrounding areas. The final implication is for municipal authorities and environmentalists that but allowing adaptation rather than demolition and redevelopment the embodied CO2 emission will be significantly reduced.

Originality/value

The study is the first qualitative study about the impact of adaptive reuse of old communist style commercial centers in Kosovo.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Sheila Conejos, Craig Langston and Jim Smith

This paper aims to make the case for the development of an adaptive reuse rating tool targeted to new building design that maximises the embedded adaptive reuse potential…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to make the case for the development of an adaptive reuse rating tool targeted to new building design that maximises the embedded adaptive reuse potential of these buildings later in their life, thereby adding to built environment sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study retrospectively analyses successful adaptive reuse projects to establish and test a multi-criteria decision-making model for new design projects. This paper contains a report on the final stages of the research methodology (quantitative approach) used in the development of the adaptSTAR model that critically assesses the list of design criteria identified in the first stage of the study. Improvements to the case studies that would have further enhanced their reuse potential later in life are proposed. The results are compared to an established decision tool (adaptive reuse potential [ARP] model) to determine their level of consistency.

Findings

The findings of this research show that design criteria can be identified and weighted according to seven categories to calculate a building’s adaptive reuse star rating. Both the adaptSTAR and ARP models exhibit a strong relationship and are positively correlated.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that by applying adaptSTAR to new designs, it will contribute to greater sustainability for the built environment in the long term via reducing the rate of building obsolescence.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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