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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Satu Huuhka and Inge Vestergaard

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relation between building conservation and circular economy (CE), which are often erroneously seen as inherently contradictory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relation between building conservation and circular economy (CE), which are often erroneously seen as inherently contradictory to one another.

Design/methodology/approach

The work draws from a comparative approach. The paper reviews a body of literature on architectural conservation and CE to establish an understanding on the state-of-the-art for both disciplines separately. Then, the relation between thereof is developed through a theoretical discourse.

Findings

Both architectural conservation and CE aim at safeguarding value, although they define “value” differently. Fabric-focused conservation and CE favor minimal intervention to material, albeit they arrive at this conclusion from different bases. Consequently, both approaches struggle with the low cost of virgin resource extraction and waste production and the high cost of human labor in contemporary Western societies. CE could be harnessed for building conservation by adopting its vocabulary and methodology, such as lifecycle assessment and material flow analysis. Transitioning toward CE can help increase the preservation of built heritage while redefining what is meant by “heritage” and “waste.”

Originality/value

Prior to this paper, there have been no articles addressing the relationship of the concepts explicitly and to this extent. The paper provides a theoretical basis for further discourse and outlines some implications of CE for the construction and built heritage disciplines.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Ioannis Poulios

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the concept of strategy in the field of heritage conservation, with a focus on a new conservation approach that promotes the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the concept of strategy in the field of heritage conservation, with a focus on a new conservation approach that promotes the empowerment of local communities and sustainable development: a living heritage approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The approaches to heritage conservation are outlined: a material-based approach defines the principles of western-based conservation, a values-based approach expands these principles, while a living heritage approach clearly challenges the established principles. These approaches are, then, analysed from the perspective of strategy, and a living heritage approach is seen as an example of strategic innovation. The process by which ICCROM develops a living heritage approach at an international level is also examined.

Findings

Choosing the “appropriate” conservation approach depends on the specific conditions of each heritage place. Yet, for the cases of living heritage in particular (with communities with an original connection with heritage) a living heritage approach would be more preferable. Living heritage approach can be seen as an example of a strategic innovation in the field of heritage conservation: it proposes a different concept of heritage and conservation (a new WHAT), points at a different community group as responsible for the definition and protection of heritage (a new WHO), and proposes a different way of heritage protection (a new HOW).

Practical implications

A living heritage approach (presented in the paper) may potentially influence the theory as well as the practice of heritage conservation in a variety of parts and heritage places in the world, especially in terms of the attitude towards local and indigenous communities.

Originality/value

Developing a new approach is, in a sense, developing a new strategy. In this context, the paper aims at bringing the insight of business strategy into the field of heritage conservation.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Rami Farouk Daher

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to provide a critical assessment of the trajectory and nature of the production of knowledge on cultural heritage on the Arab…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to provide a critical assessment of the trajectory and nature of the production of knowledge on cultural heritage on the Arab world. This evaluation of the discipline or field of cultural heritage will focus on both a historic evolution and on current practices in order to understand the nature and politics of that evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach and research methodology adopted for this paper depends primarily on a long-term critical literature review and content analysis that took place over the past 25 years concerning key reports, journal articles, books and other publications on cultural heritage on the Arab world.

Findings

The paper's main findings centers on presenting current practices/production on cultural heritage which are divided into two categories in terms of production of knowledge: an abundant engagement with a technical sphere dominated with concern for documentation and conservation technology of cultural heritage; and a scarce engagement with epistemological and theoretical spheres that delves into processes of cultural heritage definition, consumption and continuity in the Arab world.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to engage in and commence a much-needed wider discussion on the historical transformation concerning knowledge production on cultural heritage in the Arab world and its related practices and processes. The paper emphasizes the significance of this engagement with theoretical spheres of conservation and calls for an expansion of such engagement in order to elevate the discourse and debate on cultural heritage in the Arab world.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Silvio Mendes Zancheti and Lúcia Tone Ferreira Hidaka

The purpose of this paper is to set out a proposal for an indicator of conservation (Indicator of the State of Conservation – Isc) to assess the state of conservation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out a proposal for an indicator of conservation (Indicator of the State of Conservation – Isc) to assess the state of conservation of urban heritage sites. It was designed as a monitoring instrument to perform two tasks: to evaluate how the conservation of an urban site evolves over time (internal performance analysis); and to compare cities’ conservation performance (comparative performance analysis).

Design/methodology/approach

The indicator was developed using the theoretical approach. The paper presents the main concepts used as key performance indicators, that is, significance, integrity and authenticity and how they contribute to meeting the objective of attaining the sustainable conservation of heritage sites.

Findings

The Isc indicator is expressed as a function of three key performance indicators (KPIs) of significance, integrity and authenticity that are assessed by surveying the opinion of the main stakeholders involved with the conservation management of sites. The structure of the Isc is fixed and the same for all sites, independent of their geographical location. However, the structure of the KPIs can be adapted to express the social composition of stakeholders and to use the capabilities and resources of the management institutions of the sites.

Practical implications

The indicator may be used for monitoring the state of conservation of the World Heritage Urban Sites.

Social implications

The indicator allows a non‐biased evaluation of the conservation process of the World Heritage Urban Sites.

Originality/value

The paper presents the Indicator of the State of Conservation (Isc), which is the first indicator of this type.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2011

Gustavo F. Araoz

The purpose of this paper is to describe the consequences on conservation theory and practice resulting from contemporary global trends, including the increasing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the consequences on conservation theory and practice resulting from contemporary global trends, including the increasing involvement in the field by the general public and the broader social, economic and political roles that cultural heritage is being called upon to play in contemporary society.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on observations and discussions in various international fora, it is argued that alongside traditional heritage places, a new paradigm for heritage sites has emerged whose values no longer rest entirely on material culture, but on intangible concepts for which traditional conservation practice often is neither effective nor applicable.

Findings

Besides evidencing the evolution of the cultural conservation field as a continuous attempt to reconcile the conservation of cultural heritage and development, this paper reflects upon the role of the World Heritage Convention. It also puts forward several innovative ideas and potential research topics to bridge cultural heritage management and sustainable development.

Originality/value

The paper suggests how conservation of heritage sites fitting the characteristics of this new paradigm will require a re‐examination and expansion of the field's theoretical foundations, as well as the development of a new set of tools for their adequate protection.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Mônica Bahia Schlee

The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss the application of buffer zones as an urban landscape heritage management tool, using Rio de Janeiro as the main case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss the application of buffer zones as an urban landscape heritage management tool, using Rio de Janeiro as the main case study, in order to inform urban regulation around the sites inscribed as World Heritage Cultural Landscape and disclose its relevance to link urban planning, cultural heritage management and sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach encompasses: conceptual framework – contextualization of heritage protection theory, focusing on landscape protection and buffer zones; discussion: cross-national comparative overview of buffer zones conceptual framework on the international heritage protection policy; historical background and spatial analysis, through GIS mapping, of local heritage protection policy, tracing its evolution through time; examination of prospects and challenges of this management tool, including strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, based on previous international, local experiences on natural and cultural heritage protection; and gathering of strategies for the implementation of buffer zones in local landscape management.

Findings

Core heritage sites and their buffer zones are integrated elements and act together to protect landscape significance and dynamic integrity (DI). In Rio de Janeiro, beyond the function of a caution zone, other important functions of landscape heritage buffer zones are to guarantee spatial and social connections of the protected sites, as well as the visual relationship between them and other significant urban landscape features. Strategies for the implementation of buffer zones in local landscape management should address the articulation of landscape protection governance; the conservation of visual, functional and structural identity quality and legibility and the monitoring of DI.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology approach adopted in this study may also benefit from and foster further investigations, which could include the elaboration of a landscape management plan and an impact assessment inventory, refining the scale of study to the level of local watersheds, and a deeper examination of the popular cultural imprints within the World Heritage property buffer zone.

Practical implications

Strategies to the implementation of the Carioca Landscapes buffer zone include a gradation of protection and control of impacts according to the distance of the core sites (in the form of rings or layers). The buffer zone should help to preserve the character, significance, and DI of the protected sites and guarantee their spatial and social connections, as well as the visual and functional relationship between them and between other significant landscape features of the city. All those management strategies should be founded on the elaboration of a broad urban landscape management plan with the local society involvement.

Social implications

In Rio de Janeiro’s specific case, bridging the vision of culture and nature as opposite poles and, transcending the social segregation through community involvement should certainly be among the main guiding principles to the application of buffer zones for supporting landscape sustainability. Therefore, the establishment of regulation criteria and parameters within the limits of the buffer zone must acknowledge that the (urban) landscape should carefully articulate the different social agent visions and local urban contexts.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to gather different visions of the role of buffer zones and disclose possibilities of conciliation between theory and practice concerning landscape protection, arguing for gathering natural and cultural heritage policies into the urban planning processes. Harnessed together, the suggested buffer zone implementation strategies may provide a proactive approach to Rio’s urban landscape protection and contribute to foster landscape sustainability and resilience. Although based on a specific case study, the adopted methodological approach may be transferable, with some adjustments, to other World Heritage properties, especially those located in urban areas under development pressures.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Jill Atkins and Warren Maroun

We are currently experiencing what is often called the sixth period of mass extinction on planet Earth, caused undoubtedly by the impact of human activities and businesses…

Abstract

Purpose

We are currently experiencing what is often called the sixth period of mass extinction on planet Earth, caused undoubtedly by the impact of human activities and businesses on nature. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential for accounting and corporate accountability to contribute to extinction prevention. The paper adopts an interdisciplinary approach, weaving scientific evidence and theory into organisational disclosure and reporting in order to demonstrate linkages between extinction, business behaviour, accounting and accountability as well as to provide a basis for developing a framework for narrative disclosure on extinction prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is theoretical and interdisciplinary in approach, seeking to bring together scientific theories of extinction with a need for corporate and organisational accountability whilst recognising philosophical concerns in the extant environmental accounting literature about accepting any business role and capitalist mechanisms in ecological matters. The overarching framework derives from the concept of emancipatory accounting.

Findings

The outcome of the writing is to: present an emancipatory “extinction accounting” framework which can be embedded within integrated reports, and a diagrammatic representation, in the form of an “ark”, of accounting and accountability mechanisms which, combined, can assist, the authors argue, in preventing extinction. The authors suggest that the emancipatory framework may also be applied to engagement meetings between the responsible investor community (and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)) and organisations on biodiversity and species protection.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory extinction accounting and accountability frameworks within this paper should provide a basis for further research into the emancipatory potential for organisational disclosures and mechanisms of governance and accountability to prevent species extinction.

Practical implications

The next steps for researchers and practitioners involve development and implementation of the extinction accounting and engagement frameworks presented in this paper within integrated reporting and responsible investor practice.

Social implications

As outlined in this paper, extinction of any species of flora and fauna can affect significantly the functioning of local and global ecosystems, the destruction of which can have, and is having, severe and dangerous consequences for human life. Extinction prevention is critically important to the survival of the human race.

Originality/value

This paper represents a comprehensive attempt to explore the emancipatory role of accounting in extinction prevention and to bring together the linkages in accounting and accountability mechanisms which, working together, can prevent species extinction.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Silvio Mendes Zancheti and Rosane Piccolo Loretto

The purpose of this paper is to set out a proposal for the concept of dynamic integrity. It is a heritage quality that may be attributed to heritage properties whose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out a proposal for the concept of dynamic integrity. It is a heritage quality that may be attributed to heritage properties whose attributes are capable to express past and present meanings, and therefore values, in a context of change, without relying exclusively on records of memory. So, dynamic integrity (DI) emphasizes continuity in changing urban context and may be a key concept for the new Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of DI was developed using theory of complexity to critic the existing definitions of integrity and their use to in context of urban heritage area under the pressure for change.

Findings

The current concept of integrity, adopted by heritage field of knowledge, is not capable to deal with the complexity of the HUL. There is a tendency to define conservation as the regulation or control of change. This assumption is problematic since it emphasizes the changes of meanings, values and attributes, instead of the idea of continuity. Controlling change means fixing the attributes that express the meanings of heritage areas, and this is a task fated to be unsuccessful in complex cities or, even in not so complex urban sites.

Originality/value

It is the first time that the concept of integrity has been put to explain and manage the dynamics of urban heritage areas.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Fausto Cardoso, Maria Cecilia Achig-Balarezo and Gabriela Barsallo

The purpose of this paper is to present tools to support the preventive conservation of heritage buildings as part of the results of the vlirCPM research project. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present tools to support the preventive conservation of heritage buildings as part of the results of the vlirCPM research project. The tools presented are inventory systems, damage registration system, monitoring and control system, which include preventive conservation manuals and maintenance booklets.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology proposes the design of tools that support the preventive conservation of heritage buildings, which have been designed, tested and applied in the south of Ecuador through the use of maintenance campaigns in rural and urban areas.

Findings

The project developed and tested some important analysis methodologies that are now part of the research and documentation activities of the monuments of Cuenca, which have been addressed in this paper, such as the damage registration system of heritage buildings (SISREDA), the monitoring and control system, the preventive conservation manuals, the maintenance booklets and its application in the maintenance campaigns.

Originality/value

The city of Cuenca, recognized as Cultural Heritage of Humanity (UNESCO, 1999), has a wealth of heritage buildings which are susceptible to several threats that cause its deterioration. The vlirCPM (World Heritage City) research project of the faculty of architecture of the University of Cuenca has contributed to the development of tools to improve the management of world heritage sites in southern Ecuador. These tools are the result of ten years of research.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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