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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sarah Hill

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address the complexity of developing heritage assets and encourage more responsible and responsive treatment of heritage assets. The purpose of the model is to visually articulate the various elements that must be considered to successfully develop a heritage asset.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on six years of observation and industry practice, the model reflects a previously undocumented process for developing and adapting built heritage assets employed by many professionals across the UK. The model is further strengthened by drawing from other international theories, concepts, and principles.

Findings

The redevelopment of heritage assets is a “wicked problem”. The model established visually articulates current good practice in the field and provides a simplified version of the process.

Originality/value

Presently, there is insufficient contemporary literature which adequately describes or visualizes the complex adaptive reuse of built heritage in a coherent and holistic way. This model is the first to try to visually capture and communicate current good practice for widespread use. It is hoped that the documentation and dissemination of this process will help to advance creative problem solving, increase the appeal of developing heritage assets and elevate the quality of work produced.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Rocío Ortiz, Juan Manuel Macias-Bernal and Pilar Ortiz

The purpose of this paper is to present research on vulnerability and service life indexes applied to cultural heritage buildings. The construction and rehabilitation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research on vulnerability and service life indexes applied to cultural heritage buildings. The construction and rehabilitation industry is concerned with the maintenance of monuments and reducing the economic costs of urgent interventions by taking preventive conservation action in historic cities. By applying a vulnerability index or analyzing the service life of buildings, it is possible to reduce risk and optimize the identification, evaluation and prioritization of urgent monument restoration tasks in a city or a region to establish preventive conservation policies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research sets out the concepts of vulnerability and service life, focusing on their methodologies in comparison with other techniques for building diagnosis, discussing the differences between indexes that measure the vulnerability and service life of buildings.

Findings

The vulnerability of three churches in Seville (Spain) was studied by means of their vulnerability index, based on Delphi analysis, and the service life of these buildings was also assessed, based on artificial intelligence tools. Delphi and artificial intelligence tools allow us to compare and dovetail different scenarios and expert opinions. The degree of each monument’s conservation is defined as its vulnerability index, which is an indirect function of deterioration levels. The service life of buildings, on the other hand, includes the assessment of vulnerability and hazards.

Practical implications

This study is useful for stakeholders, including small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and policymakers, as an important reference on diagnosis, including updated, inexpensive and sustainable methodologies to manage the conservation of monuments, which are easy to implement in developed and developing countries. The application of vulnerability and/or service life indicators is crucial to ensuring the sustainability and improvement of maintenance carried out on cultural heritage buildings.

Originality/value

This study details new approaches based on artificial intelligence and Delphi analysis to prioritize preventive conservation actions in a city or region.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Maria Rispoli and Samantha Organ

Concerns about climate change and the availability of energy has resulted in countries setting targets to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions. A large…

Abstract

Purpose

Concerns about climate change and the availability of energy has resulted in countries setting targets to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions. A large proportion of energy is consumed by existing housing. Europe has a large proportion of historic housing, some of which also represent significant value in relation to historical, cultural and/or architectural importance. Upgrading their energy efficiency whilst retaining their significance is crucial for the sustainability of heritage buildings. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges and barriers to improving the energy efficiency of listed pre-1919 housing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilised semi-structured interviews to explore the debates surrounding sustainability and conservation, identifying the key drivers and barriers to achieving a balance between these concepts.

Findings

Concern about climate change and the desire to preserve a heritage asset were the main drivers to balancing sustainability with conservation through energy efficiency improvements. The main challenges included the risk of detrimentally affecting the significance of the building, the lack of communication and collaboration between stakeholders, the availability of adequately skilled professionals and the lack of appropriate energy efficiency solutions for heritage buildings. The cost of improvements was found to be both a barrier and driver.

Originality/value

Heritage buildings perform differently to their modern counterparts and therefore the measures the authors apply to these historic properties must be done with sufficient understanding of this difference. Such measures must be compatible with these buildings in line with conservation principles. Further, the discussion of developing an alternative version of energy calculation for these buildings should be entered into.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Stephen Todd

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Sveinung K. Berg

The purpose of this paper is to show the gap between the authorised heritage discourse (AHD) as practised within Norwegian heritage management and the recommendations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the gap between the authorised heritage discourse (AHD) as practised within Norwegian heritage management and the recommendations forwarded by UNESCO for the managing of the historic urban landscape (HUL), indicating that a shift is necessary to manage dynamic urban change.

Design/methodology/approach

A current development initiative in Oslo is used to show how heritage values can be differentiated by a spatial scale to prioritise between heritage goods at a practical level and as an attempt to balance financial interests and the values identified by heritage criteria.

Findings

The scaling of heritage assets is useful for distinguishing between different levels or types of value (cultural/economic, private/social/public) but is not sufficient for obtaining the aims forwarded by UNESCO within an AHD that does not support development of HULs. A contextual understanding of heritage value must be obtained to make heritage a vital resource in the contemporary urban context.

Practical implications

A broader understanding of what constitutes the urban environment, including economic viability, seems mandatory to make the current Norwegian practice of heritage management more adaptive to the dynamic nature of living cities and the ambitions reflected in the recommendations from UNESCO.

Originality/value

Integrating development potential as a criterion adds a dynamic aspect to the valuation of heritage not sufficiently present in the current practice and literature.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Chijindu V. Nwachukwu, Chika Udeaja, Nicholas Chileshe and Chimene E. Okere

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural significance in them and have seen them become valuable to the economy of the country. The heritage sector makes significant contributions to the UK economy through provision of tourist attractive sites, construction and servicing of heritage assets, heritage conservation, research, and commercial activities carried out within and around heritage assets. These benefits have seen them draw considerable interests from diverse stakeholders within and outside the heritage sector. Hence, a lot of attention is drawn toward restoration of such assets, from stakeholders of different interests, ranging from advocacies for no alteration to complete alteration of the heritage assets. As with construction projects, conflict of interests amongst stakeholders affect the outcome of restoration projects and the purpose of this paper is to examine the critical success factors (CSFs) for managing the stakeholders to achieve the projects’ objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the views and experiences of practitioners in the heritage sector who have been involved with BHA restoration projects. A total of 32 CSFs for stakeholder management, obtained through rigorous reviews of literature, were subjected to a severe scrutiny with eight restoration experts to determine the importance of the CSFs in restoration projects. The outcome of the exercise was a modified list of 20 CSFs which were further tested on 52 restoration practitioners in the UK using a structured questionnaire to determine the degree of importance of each of the CSFs in restoration projects and their relationships as perceived by the practitioners.

Findings

The results of the analyses performed on the data show that most of the CSFs were perceived by restoration practitioners as truly critical and vital for successful management of stakeholders in restoration of BHAs. The results also indicate that there is a strong consensus amongst over 50 percent of the practitioners on the rankings of the CSFs.

Practical implications

The identified CSFs could be used by the restoration practitioners as a “road map” for the development of appropriate solutions for successfully managing stakeholders associated with the promotion and BHAs restoration assets.

Originality/value

Although CSFs for stakeholder management in construction have been studied by many scholars, no specific research could be identified prior to this study to have been done in defining the CSFs for stakeholder management in restoration projects.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Brit Anak Kayan

Sustainability encapsulated economic, environmental and societal parameters. Without exception, these parameters also conforms the efficiency and increasingly importance…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability encapsulated economic, environmental and societal parameters. Without exception, these parameters also conforms the efficiency and increasingly importance of sustainable maintenance management for built heritage. However, there is less attention to the appraisal approach for maintenance management of built heritage, twinned with inconsistent and impractical assessment upon their maintenance strategies. With the aim to support sustainability, the purpose of this paper is to give an insight to the question on how the maintenance management appraisal approach practically determines and ultimately substantiates the decision-making process that promotes sustainable built heritage, based on current scenarios and practices in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Maintenance management appraisal for sampling of built heritage enables assessment of efficiency of maintenance and repair during maintenance phase based on survey (questionnaires) and statistical analysis.

Findings

It recognises the importance of maintenance management appraisal in achieving efficiency and underpinning rationale decision making for maintenance strategies and service quality (SERVQUAL).

Practical implications

It must be emphasised that maintenance management appraisal is not confined to built heritage, and can be applied to any types and forms of property. The decision made as a result of its utilisation is practically support sustainable repair.

Social implications

The implementation of this appraisal highlights the efficacy of maintenance strategies and SERVQUAL that may be adopted.

Originality/value

The paper is a rigorous appraisal of maintenance management of built heritage. This appraisal relays the “true” sustainable built heritage, contextualised within maintenance strategies and SERVQUAL that consequently allows rationale in achieving sustainable development.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Mohsenah Al Yami, Mian M. Ajmal and Sreejith Balasubramanian

Firm size is an important contingency variable in macro-organizational studies. Several questions arise in relation to knowledge management and organizational size that is…

Abstract

Purpose

Firm size is an important contingency variable in macro-organizational studies. Several questions arise in relation to knowledge management and organizational size that is critical to both public and private organizations. Unfortunately, despite its significance, all or most of the studies that examined the effects of organizational size’ on knowledge management have been in the private sector. This paper aims to empirically study the effects of organizational size on the key knowledge management processes and subsequent operational efficiency derived from its implementation in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured country-wide survey of United Arab Emirates public sector organizations was conducted. The 383 completed responses obtained were then analysed to assess the hypothesized differences in the implementation of knowledge management processes (knowledge acquisition, knowledge creation, knowledge capture, knowledge storage and retrieval, knowledge sharing, knowledge utilization) and its impact on the operational efficiency across small and medium, large and very large public sector organizations.

Findings

The results revealed that the extent of implementation of all six knowledge management processes and operational efficiency followed an inverted “V” pattern, in which, both knowledge management processes and operational efficiency was found to increase while transitioning from small and medium entities to large entities, but was found to decrease while transitioning from large to very large entities. In terms of relationships, while all knowledge management processes had a significant positive impact on the operational efficiency of the public sector, the ability to derive operational efficiency from knowledge management processes was found to be the highest for very large public sector organizations.

Practical implications

The novel findings are useful for practitioners and policymakers, especially those overseeing a country’s knowledge management initiatives to devise strategies, policies and support mechanisms to ensure public sector organizations, regardless of their size, can implement efficient and effective knowledge management processes to improve their operational efficiency.

Originality/value

The study is arguably the first comprehensive attempt to understand the impact of organizational size on knowledge management in the public sector.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Mohsenah Al Yami and Mian M. Ajmal

Knowledge management (KM) is increasingly becoming critical to public sector organizations as it is to private sector organizations. This is because public sector…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) is increasingly becoming critical to public sector organizations as it is to private sector organizations. This is because public sector organizations are increasingly held accountable for their actions and are forced to move away from traditional bureaucratic approaches to more managerial ones. For instance, public sector is facing pressure to improve its operational efficiency such as productivity, lead time and expenditure. Similarly, it is also facing pressure to improve its transparency, trust, reliability and accountability, which are key elements of sustainable development (SD). The purpose of this study therefore is to understand the intricate relationship between KM processes, operational efficiency and SD in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework consisting of eight constructs (knowledge acquisition, knowledge creation, knowledge capture, knowledge storage and retrieval, knowledge sharing, knowledge utilization, operational efficiency and SD) and their underlying items was developed through an extensive literature review. Using 383 usable responses collected through a structured questionnaire from the UAE public sector, the constructs and framework were first validated and then the current level of implementation/achievement of KM processes, operational efficiency and SD was assessed along with the hypothesized relationships between the constructs.

Findings

The findings show that KM processes had a positive and significant direct impact on operational efficiency and SD. Also, operational efficiency was found to strongly mediate the relationship between KM processes and SD.

Practical implications

The findings are expected to help UAE public sector organizations devise strategies and policy interventions to align and improve their KM processes for achieving operational efficiency and SD. Public sectors looking to focus on SD must focus on KM processes and strive to improve stakeholder engagement, which is a vital aspect of SD.

Originality/value

Integration of KM processes, operational efficiency and SD has not been attempted previously and hence constitutes the novelty of this work.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Chao Ma, Chia-Huei Wu, (George) Zhen Xiong Chen, Xinhui Jiang and Wu Wei

The purpose of this paper is to build a moderate mediation model to delineate the effects of leader humility on employee constructive voice behavior based on conservation

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a moderate mediation model to delineate the effects of leader humility on employee constructive voice behavior based on conservation of resources theory and crossover of resources model. Specifically, when a leader behaves with humility, the followers will be more likely to feel they receive psychological resources from their interactions with the leader (i.e. relational energy), and thus engage in more constructive voice behavior. In addition, this energizing effect only occurs when the leader is perceived as having higher apparent sincerity by their subordinates.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses of this study were empirically tested using multi-timepoint and multi-source (i.e. supervisors and subordinates) survey data in China. Study 1, based on data from 449 subordinates and 88 immediate supervisors, was conducted to test the proposed mediation effect. Study 2, based on data from 185 subordinates and 50 immediate supervisors, was conducted to replicate the findings of Study 1 and test the integrated model.

Findings

The results of Study 1 support the proposed mediation effect that leader humility positively predicts followers’ constructive voice behavior via boosting followers’ relational energy. The results of Study 2 replicate the findings of Study 1 and further indicate that leader humility is only positively related to perceived relational energy when a leader is perceived as having higher apparent sincerity by their subordinates.

Practical implications

This paper provides detailed instructions for business practitioners. First, given that employee constructive voice behavior is related to employee relational energy and is beneficial to organizations, leaders are encouraged to behave with humility when interacting with their subordinates. Second, from the perspective of human resource management, well-designed training programs can be used to help leaders to develop leader humility. Third, the findings of this paper call attention to a potential risk for humble leaders. Organizations should educate leaders on the potential negative consequences of false humility and encourage leader humility that will appear in leaders’ sincerity.

Originality/value

Overall, drawing on conservation of resources theory and crossover of resources model, this paper reveals that boosting relational energy is a mechanism via which humble leaders can shape employees’ voice behavior. Second, by examining the moderation effect of apparent sincerity of leaders from followers’ perspective, this paper suggests an actor–recipient perspective to identify the boundaries of the energizing mechanism. Third, the findings of this paper add to the knowledge on voice research by highlighting an additional source of energy for employee constructive voice behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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