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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Umi Kalsum Zolkafli, Zahiriah Yahya, Norhanim Zakaria, Farid Wajdi Akashah and Azlan Shah Ali

– The purpose of this paper is to identify the most influential buildings elements in term of the cost for timber restoration works.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the most influential buildings elements in term of the cost for timber restoration works.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employed the case studies methods with questionnaires surveys. Two case studies were chosen and questionnaire surveys were distributed to contractors and consultation companies. The cost was identified based on the elemental cost analysis of historic timber buildings.

Findings

The restoration of historic timber buildings in Malaysia has grown rapidly, especially in the UNESCO world heritage sites, Melaka and Penang. Data obtained on the restorations of timber buildings show that the most influential elements were upper floors, roofs and walls. Termites’ invasions and the lack of building analysis were found to be the major issue in timber restoration works. In addition, the availability of timber material contributed significantly to the increase of cost for restoration works.

Originality/value

The cost for every element was identified and was used as a reference for new restorations projects of historical, timber buildings. This paper also highlighted the causes for the problems and the factors affecting the cost of timber restoration works. These data are useful information, especially for surveyors and contractors who are involved in the restoration of historic timber buildings. Maintaining or replacing these elements with other material can help to minimise the restoration cost of timber buildings in Malaysia.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Al-Muttar Mohammed Yousif Oudah

The chapter dwells on barriers for restoration and development of country's infrastructure on the platform of individual physical and practical forces, which are peculiar…

Abstract

The chapter dwells on barriers for restoration and development of country's infrastructure on the platform of individual physical and practical forces, which are peculiar for the states with developing and transitional economy, as well as for developed countries. Directions of formation of the organizational model of restoration and development of country's infrastructure on the platform of individual physical and practical forces are presented; forms of public–private partnership are studied, as well as possibilities of financing. An important aspect is finding the mechanisms of leveling the risks according to the given classification. A mechanism of organizational model of controlling development of country's infrastructure and its structural elements are provided.

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Threats from Car Traffic to the Quality of Urban Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-048144-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Chijindu V. Nwachukwu, Chika Udeaja, Nicholas Chileshe and Chimene E. Okere

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Built heritage or historic assets (BHAs) constructed in the pre-nineteenth century in the UK are perceived to have certain characteristics which instill cultural significance in them and have seen them become valuable to the economy of the country. The heritage sector makes significant contributions to the UK economy through provision of tourist attractive sites, construction and servicing of heritage assets, heritage conservation, research, and commercial activities carried out within and around heritage assets. These benefits have seen them draw considerable interests from diverse stakeholders within and outside the heritage sector. Hence, a lot of attention is drawn toward restoration of such assets, from stakeholders of different interests, ranging from advocacies for no alteration to complete alteration of the heritage assets. As with construction projects, conflict of interests amongst stakeholders affect the outcome of restoration projects and the purpose of this paper is to examine the critical success factors (CSFs) for managing the stakeholders to achieve the projects’ objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the views and experiences of practitioners in the heritage sector who have been involved with BHA restoration projects. A total of 32 CSFs for stakeholder management, obtained through rigorous reviews of literature, were subjected to a severe scrutiny with eight restoration experts to determine the importance of the CSFs in restoration projects. The outcome of the exercise was a modified list of 20 CSFs which were further tested on 52 restoration practitioners in the UK using a structured questionnaire to determine the degree of importance of each of the CSFs in restoration projects and their relationships as perceived by the practitioners.

Findings

The results of the analyses performed on the data show that most of the CSFs were perceived by restoration practitioners as truly critical and vital for successful management of stakeholders in restoration of BHAs. The results also indicate that there is a strong consensus amongst over 50 percent of the practitioners on the rankings of the CSFs.

Practical implications

The identified CSFs could be used by the restoration practitioners as a “road map” for the development of appropriate solutions for successfully managing stakeholders associated with the promotion and BHAs restoration assets.

Originality/value

Although CSFs for stakeholder management in construction have been studied by many scholars, no specific research could be identified prior to this study to have been done in defining the CSFs for stakeholder management in restoration projects.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Jing Pan, Mihaela Vorvoreanu and Zheng Zhou

This research aims to investigate the current patterns of social media adoption for marketing in the restoration industry and analyse the strategies used by those…

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1212

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the current patterns of social media adoption for marketing in the restoration industry and analyse the strategies used by those restoration companies that have adopted social media. Social media marketing has been proven as a cost-effective way to engage new customers, and especially useful for small businesses. The disaster “restoration industry” is the special sector of general contracting that serves both commercial and residential property owners in terms of restoring their disaster-affected property. The restoration industry is characterised by small-business domination and constant need of new customers to survive in the market. Many restoration contractors have started adopting social media for marketing. However, goals and social media marketing strategies have not yet been clearly articulated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a systematic content analysis (CA) of sample restoration companies’ Facebook and Twitter posts over a 30-day study period. After a preliminary investigation of the industry, the researchers selected the Restoration Industry Association (RIA) member companies, as the research population. Sixty companies were randomly selected from the 1,165 RIA member companies, which equals to 5 per cent of the population. Reliability was tested statistically using Cohen’s Kappa.

Findings

Three levels of adoption were derived from the data: active users, non-active users and non-adopters. More than half of the sample companies were found to have adopted at least one social media channel for marketing. However, only 26 out of the 60 sample companies were active on the social media that they have adopted. Active adopters showed, on average, relatively frequent usage patterns, with 10 Facebook posts and 37 tweets in a 30-day period. Sampled restoration companies which were active social media users posted mostly announcements and educational information of Facebook and used Twitter for news and direct interaction with customers. The observed companies revealed a mix of business-relevant content and personalised content including personal greetings, sharing of photos about holidays and fun events.

Research limitations/implications

Three levels of adoption were derived from the data: active users, non-active users and non-adopters. More than half of the sample companies were found to have adopted at least one social media channel for marketing. However, only 26 out of the 60 sample companies were active on the social media that they have adopted. Active adopters showed, on average, relatively frequent usage patterns, with 10 Facebook posts and 37 tweets in a 30-day period. Sampled restoration companies that were active social media users posted mostly announcements and educational information of Facebook and used Twitter for news and direct interaction with customers. The observed companies revealed a mix of business-relevant content and personalised content including personal greetings, sharing of photos about holidays and fun events.

Practical implications

The results showed that social media adoption has not yet penetrated the restoration industry – the adoption rate of 65 per cent is significantly lower than the 77 per cent of companies in all industries. In-depth CA of active social media users revealed patterns of engagement on Facebook and Twitter. This paper built on those patterns to emphasise strategies restoration companies can use to build interpersonal relationships and trust, which can lead to increased word-of-mouth recommendations; facilitate customer contact through a cross-linking strategy; and engage in simple methods for search engine optimisation. These strategic recommendations are grounded in existing practices and, therefore, are feasible and accessible for disaster restoration companies.

Originality/value

The research results showed how the construction industry, especially small businesses, has adopted social media for marketing. A snapshot of the industry’s level of social media adoption for marketing strategy can provide a useful reference point about the industry’s practices and potential future directions. This paper provides suggestions about effective social media marketing strategies. The paper also illustrates the use of CA as a promising method for research in construction management.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Bassam Baroudi and Randy R. Rapp

This paper aims to identify stakeholder issues on disaster restoration projects from a contractor perspective. Disaster occurrences normally warrant substantial restoration

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify stakeholder issues on disaster restoration projects from a contractor perspective. Disaster occurrences normally warrant substantial restoration and reconstruction efforts. These projects involve the mitigation and repair of disaster-affected buildings and structures.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is essentially exploratory in nature. It reviews relevant literature and then presents empirical research findings garnered from disaster restoration practitioners. A survey using the Likert rating scale method was used. The data were collected via an online questionnaire survey.

Findings

The results confirm that disaster restoration projects contain significant stakeholder issues and challenges. Furthermore, these can differ from conventional construction and the work of “first responders” to disaster situations. Hence, disaster restoration projects are seen as having their own unique identity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has only set out to uncover stakeholder issues on disaster restoration projects. Future research that delves into the issues in greater depth would be useful.

Practical implications

Disaster restoration practitioners need to be aware of conflicting stakeholder interests. These need careful management so that stakeholder issues do not impact successful project outcomes. Hence, informing industry (and academia) on these issues carries significant importance.

Originality/value

Past research has tended to adopt macro perspectives on disaster preparedness, response and management. This research focuses on repairing and restoring disaster-affected buildings and structures from a restoration industry standpoint. The findings should be useful to the global disaster restoration community and those in associated fields.

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International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Bassam Baroudi and Randy Rapp

Disaster restoration concerns the mitigation and repair of buildings and property resulting from natural and man-made disasters. This paper aims to investigate current…

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507

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster restoration concerns the mitigation and repair of buildings and property resulting from natural and man-made disasters. This paper aims to investigate current attitudes with respect to disaster restoration project management leadership and its associated education.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature is presented to provide some background with respect to disaster restoration projects, project management and leadership education. This is followed by a questionnaire survey that seeks opinion from appropriately qualified industry practitioners on a series of important issues with respect to the topic.

Findings

The results provide some insight into disaster restoration leadership education and methods. It was found that varied degrees of support existed on issues involving knowledge, teaching approaches and delivery modes.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on leadership and education as it pertains to the restoration of buildings post disaster. It does not delve into leadership education with respect to disaster management in general.

Practical implications

Appropriate education and training of industry participants needs to take place to ensure that qualified people undertake restoration projects. This study informs disaster restoration educators and industry with respect to leadership education and methods.

Originality/value

There have been many studies on leadership and education. However, this study has a specific focus on how disaster restoration practitioners view leadership and its associated education within their field.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Lisa A.W. Kensler and Cynthia L. Uline

The purpose of this paper is to articulate, and advocate for, a deep shift in how the authors conceptualize and enact school leadership and reform. The authors challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to articulate, and advocate for, a deep shift in how the authors conceptualize and enact school leadership and reform. The authors challenge fundamental conceptions regarding educational systems and call for a dramatic shift from the factory model to a living systems model of schooling. The authors call is not a metaphorical call. The authors propose embracing assumptions grounded in the basic human nature as living systems. Green school leaders, practicing whole school sustainability, provide emerging examples of educational restoration.

Design/methodology/approach

School reform models have implicitly and even explicitly embraced industrialized assumptions about students and learning. Shifting from the factory model of education to a living systems model of whole school sustainability requires transformational strategies more associated with nature and life than machines. Ecological restoration provides the basis for the model of educational restoration.

Findings

Educational restoration, as proposed here, makes nature a central player in the conversations about ecologies of learning, both to improve the quality of learning for students and to better align educational practice with social, economic and environmental needs of the time. Educational leaders at all levels of the educational system have critical roles to play in deconstructing factory model schooling and reform. The proposed framework for educational restoration raises new questions and makes these opportunities visible. Discussion of this framework begins with ecological circumstances and then addresses, values, commitment and judgments.

Practical implications

Educational restoration will affect every aspect of teaching, learning and leading. It will demand new approaches to leadership preparation. This new landscape of educational practice is wide open for innovative approaches to research, preparation and practice across the field of educational leadership.

Originality/value

The model of educational restoration provides a conceptual foundation for future research and leadership practice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Nur Atakul, Muhammad Jamaluddin Thaheem and Alberto De Marco

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and develop a knowledge base for the restoration industry to understand and deal with risks arising in restoration projects in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and develop a knowledge base for the restoration industry to understand and deal with risks arising in restoration projects in a sustainable way. Restoration projects face a number of risks and are viewed unfavorably. The research study, therefore, is expected to generate interest and debate among the professional and researcher community in the arena of restoration of built cultural heritage for formally applying Project Management (PM) and Project Risk management (PRM) theories and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method consists of reviewing published literature and analyzing the dynamics of restoration industry (both from academic and practitioner point of view) in order to propose an application framework. Building upon and taking inspiration from the fundamentals of Construction Management, the proposed framework aims at methodically applying risk management within the proposed PM stages.

Findings

Research results confirm that the restoration industry has not yet exposed to formal PM and PRM theories and practices to a greater level. The restoration projects are not necessarily so sustainable in their approach. Thus, there is enormous impetus and ensuing incentive for incorporating the formal theories and customized tools.

Research limitations/implications

This research attempts to target the exceedingly important area of cultural heritage restoration and the missing aspect of PM and PRM. Further, the proposed framework is an attempt at bridging communication gaps between management and restoration experts. Thus, it highlights the importance of scientifically and effectively managing restoration projects. Nevertheless, this uniting attempt has its own risks in terms of terminologies, technical language, and the understanding of risk and its management which may be the effective limitations. Since in the field of engineering as well, the foundation of PM and PRM areas of knowledge finds its traces in Construction Management – which is further an application of management in construction engineering – therefore, it is rather challenging to reconcile knowledge from different areas.

Practical implications

The paper explores issues concerning sustainability of restoration projects based on their use of PM and PRM. Results are expected to help stakeholders of restoration projects understand and apply the proposed PRM framework. This study is also aimed to develop a foundation for dissemination of PM and PRM knowledge in the restoration industry, and provide an impetus for future studies to examine how restoration projects can deal with risky situations.

Social implications

The paper explores the sustainable development aspects of restoration projects in order to help stakeholders of built cultural heritage make critical decisions because if not managed properly, risks in a restoration project may either cause project failure or damage the historical buildings. Therefore, from a sustainable perspective, it is imperative that stakeholders identify, analyze, control and manage risks before commencing the restoration activities.

Originality/value

The study is an original effort in examining the penetration of PM and PRM practices in restoration industry. Based on it, the study proposes an original framework for application of formal PRM for restoration projects. Results are of relevance in today's world where risks hinder and sustainability guides the decision making.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Shuai Yang, Wenjie Zhao, Yongzhen Ke, Jiaying Liu and Yongjiang Xue

Due to the inability to directly apply an intra-oral image with esthetic restoration to restore tooth shape in the computer-aided design system, this paper aims to propose…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the inability to directly apply an intra-oral image with esthetic restoration to restore tooth shape in the computer-aided design system, this paper aims to propose a method that can use two-dimensional contours obtained from the image for the three-dimensional dental mesh model restoration.

Design/methodology/approach

First, intra-oral image and smiling image are taken from the patient, then teeth shapes of the images are designed based on esthetic restoration concepts and the pixel coordinates of the teeth’s contours are converted into the vertex coordinates in the three-dimensional space. Second, the dental mesh model is divided into three parts – active part, passive part and fixed part – based on the teeth’s contours of the mesh model. Third, the vertices from the teeth’s contours of the dental model are matched with ones from the intra-oral image and with the help of matching operation, the target coordinates of each vertex in the active part can be calculated. Finally, the Laplacian-based deformation algorithm and mesh smoothing algorithm are performed.

Findings

Benefitting from the proposed method, the dental mesh model with esthetic restoration can be quickly obtained based on the intra-oral image that is the result of doctor-patient communication. Experimental results show that the quality of restoration meets clinical needs, and the typical time cost of the method is approximately one second. So the method is both time-saving and user-friendly.

Originality/value

The method provides the possibility to design personalized dental esthetic restoration solutions rapidly.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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