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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Martin Hubert Ofner, Kevin Straub, Boris Otto and Hubert Oesterle

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects…

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2692

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to propose a reference model describing a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects. The Master Data Lifecycle Management (MDLM) map provides a structured approach to analyze the master data lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Embedded in a design oriented research process, the paper applies the Component Business Model (CBM) method and suggests a reference model which identifies the business components required to manage the master data lifecycle. CBM is a patented IBM method to analyze the key components of a business domain. The paper uses a participative case study to evaluate the suggested model.

Findings

Based on a participative case study, the paper shows how the reference model makes it possible to analyze the master data lifecycle on a strategic, a tactical and an operational level, and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents design work and a participative case study. The reference model is grounded in existing literature and represents a comprehensive framework forming the foundation for future analysis of the master data lifecycle. Furthermore, the model represents an abstraction of an organization's master data lifecycle. Hence, it forms a “theory for designing”. More research is needed in order to more thoroughly evaluate the presented model in a variety of real‐life settings.

Practical implications

The paper shows how the reference model enables practitioners to analyze the master data lifecycle and how it helps identify areas of improvement.

Originality/value

The paper reports on an attempt to establish a holistic view of the master data lifecycle, including strategic, tactical and operational aspects, in order to provide more comprehensive support for its analysis and improvement.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Xiaoyu Yang, Philip R. Moore, Chi‐Biu Wong, Jun‐Sheng Pu and Seng Kwong Chong

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life…

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5505

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to capture and manage the product lifecycle data for consumer products, especially data that occur in distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages, and to use them to provide information and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A lifecycle information acquisition and management model is proposed, and an information management system framework is formulated. The information management system developed is then used in actual field trials to manage lifecycle data for refrigeration products and game consoles.

Findings

It has been demonstrated that valuable services can be delivered through a lifecycle information management system.

Practical implications

Lifecycle information management systems can open new horizons for product design which are sustainable and environmentally sensitive. They also contribute to the wider exploration of eco‐design and development of next generation consumer products (e.g. smart home appliances).

Originality/value

Existing lifecycle information systems cannot support all phases of the product lifecycle. They mainly manage the lifecycle data only during the design and manufacture stages. Lifecycle data during distribution, usage, maintenance and end‐of‐life stages are usually hard to acquire and in most cases lost. The lifecycle information management system developed can capture them, and manage them in an integrated and systematic manner to provide information and knowledge.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Saheed O. Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele and Jamiu A. Dauda

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the atmosphere. As a way of improving the sustainability of building construction and operation, various sustainable design appraisal standards have been developed across nations. Albeit criticism of the appraisal standards, evidence shows that increasing sustainability of the built environment has been engendered by such appraisal tools as Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), Code for Sustainable Homes (CfSH), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficacy, among others. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the appraisal standards in engendering whole lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to evaluate the adequacy of sustainability scores assigned to various lifecycle stages of buildings in the appraisal standards, four case studies of a block of classroom were modelled. Using Revit as a modelling platform, stage by stage lifecycle environmental impacts of the building were simulated through Green Building Studio and ATHENA Impact estimator. The resulting environmental impacts were then compared against the assessment score associated with each stage of building lifecycle in BREAAM and CfSH.

Findings

Results show that albeit the consensus that the appraisal standards engender sustainability practices in the AEC industry, total scores assigned to impacts at each stage of building lifecycle is disproportionate to the simulated whole-life environmental impacts associated with the stages in some instances.

Originality/value

As the study reveals both strengths and weaknesses in the existing sustainability appraisal standards, measures through which they can be tailored to resource efficiency and lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment are suggested.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Andrew Martin Cox and Winnie Wan Ting Tam

Visualisations of research and research-related activities including research data management (RDM) as a lifecycle have proliferated in the last decade. The purpose of…

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1816

Abstract

Purpose

Visualisations of research and research-related activities including research data management (RDM) as a lifecycle have proliferated in the last decade. The purpose of this paper is to offer a systematic analysis and critique of such models.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework for analysis synthesised from the literature presented and applied to nine examples.

Findings

The strengths of the lifecycle representation are to clarify stages in research and to capture key features of project-based research. Nevertheless, their weakness is that they typically mask various aspects of the complexity of research, constructing it as highly purposive, serial, uni-directional and occurring in a somewhat closed system. Other types of models such as spiral of knowledge creation or the data journey reveal other stories about research. It is suggested that we need to develop other metaphors and visualisations around research.

Research limitations/implications

The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of the popular lifecycle model for research and RDM, and also considers alternative ways of representing them.

Practical implications

Librarians use lifecycle models to explain service offerings to users so the analysis will help them identify clearly the best type of representation for particular cases. The critique offered by the paper also reveals that because researchers do not necessarily identify with a lifecycle representation, alternative ways of representing research need to be developed.

Originality/value

The paper offers a systematic analysis of visualisations of research and RDM current in the Library and Information Studies literature revealing the strengths and weaknesses of the lifecycle metaphor.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Muhammad Mustafa Kamal and Marinos Themistocleous

The purpose of this paper is to explore and validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of factors influencing the decision making process for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of factors influencing the decision making process for enterprise application integration (EAI) adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases in two local government authorities (LGAs).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study based research approach using interviews with the decision makers is utilised to investigate the less acknowledged phenomena like EAI adoption. This approach assists in examining the phenomenon in its natural setting, examining the in‐depth complexities and processes, and providing considerable flexibility during interviews and observations.

Findings

According to the empirical findings, the factors influencing EAI adoption and the adoption lifecycle phases are appropriate for studying the research context. The analysis and study of the factors and adoption lifecycle phases is made carefully and specifically to fit and be compatible within the context of LGAs. As a result, it is apparent from the empirical findings that most of the factors influence the decision making process for EAI adoption on each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the case organisations with exception to few factors.

Research limitations/implications

The combination of theoretical discussions, analysis of the literature and empirical research presented in this paper illustrates the start of research on EAI adoption in LGAs. However, the theoretical and empirical data collected are confined to the limited context of two LGAs within the region of England. The structure of LGAs varies in different parts of the UK. In the light of the reflections and the research limitations of this paper it is recommended that further work could usefully be pursed to validate the adoption lifecycle phases and perform the mapping of the factors at each phase of the adoption lifecycle in the context of other types of LGAs, different cities and countries.

Originality/value

From a conceptual and empirical point of view, none of the existing EAI adoption studies investigated the mapping of the factors influencing EAI adoption on the adoption lifecycle phases. In doing so, the authors consider this as a literature void and report that it is important to understand and manage the EAI adoption process in LGAs. The mapping of factors process is substantial as it may enhance the analysis of EAI adoption process in LGAs and further facilitate the decision makers in realising the importance of EAI adoption factors.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Jing Jian Xiao and Rui Yao

The purpose of this paper is to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories using multiple data sets that are nationally representative of American…

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1858

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories using multiple data sets that are nationally representative of American families.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous research, 15 lifecycle categories appropriate for American families are defined by household head's age, marital status, presence of children, and age of children. Data used are from Surveys of Consumer Finances (SCF) in the USA in 1992-2010. Multiple logistic regressions are conducted to identify probabilities of debt delinquencies of families in various lifecycle categories by controlling for income, financial assets, holdings of several types of debt, and several other demographic and socioeconomic variables.

Findings

The results show that among the 15 household lifecycle categories, the top three most likely to be delinquent are young couples with children aged seven or older, middle-aged singles with children aged 15 or older, and middle-aged singles with children under 15. Younger households are more financially distressed than their older counterparts. Presence of children increases the probability of debt delinquency.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, multiple national data sets representing American families are used to document debt delinquency patterns by family lifecycle categories. Results shed light on this important topic and offer helpful information for both banking industry practitioners and consumer financial educators.

Practical implications

The information produced by this study can help bank managers better identify their potential clients and understand their current customers. Different marketing strategies based on the research findings can be developed to attract and retain customers with different delinquency risks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine debt delinquencies by family lifecycle categories with multiple SCF data sets in the USA. The 15 family lifecycle categories used are based on recent research that is specially designed for American families. The research findings provide straightforward implications for both bank managers and consumer educators.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Shivalik Singh and Bala Subrahmanya Mungila Hillemane

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the factors determining the choice of sources of finance for a tech startup over its lifecycle.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the factors determining the choice of sources of finance for a tech startup over its lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts simple random sampling technique to choose 93 sample tech startups in Bangalore. Further, this study employs the primary data collection from the sampled startups under study through a semi-structured questionnaire and in-depth interviews with the founders/CEOs of these startups. Furthermore, it carries out binary logistic regression analysis to primarily examine the likelihood of a tech startup to approach and access a particular source of finance over its lifecycle.

Findings

Our results indicate that a tech startup's choice for a financial source varies with its lifecycle stage and financial requirements. We find that while in its early stage, a tech startup's choice of a financial source is limited to business angels (BA), in the growth stage, it approaches the institutional sources, viz. Venture Capital (VC), Corporate Venture Capital (CVC), Banks and Private Equity (PE) firms alternatively. Out of the three major categories of financial requirements: Human Capital (HC), Research Capital (RC) and Social Capital (SC), the requirement for HC and SC is predominantly funded by VCs, while the acquisition of RC is facilitated by early stage investors (BAs) as well as growth stage investors (CVC and PEs).

Research limitations/implications

The research implication of the study lies in bringing out the need to understand both the nature and the quantum of financial requirements of tech startups would influence the sources of finance it would approach and obtain finance for its operations and growth.

Practical implications

The major policy implication of the study refers to the need to promote the diverse sources of finance to meet the diverse needs of finance in different stages of a tech startup's lifecycle. Particularly in an emerging economy, where we do not see the emergence and growth of highly innovative tech startups, the need to promote adequate availability of RC is especially important.

Originality/value

This study makes a key contribution to the entrepreneurial finance literature by empirically investigating the factors determining a tech startup's propensity to approach and access a particular source of finance over its lifecycle.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Mari Juntunen

– The purpose of this paper is to develop the lifecycle and teleology process theory illustrations by uniting processes and their outcomes based on their being bounded in time.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the lifecycle and teleology process theory illustrations by uniting processes and their outcomes based on their being bounded in time.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines objective and subjective ontological approaches to organisational development and change processes. The narrative data of corporate rebranding among small B2B companies were gathered through a multiple case study and analysed in relation to flow of time. The illustrations of teleology and lifecycle process theory are modified based on empirical data.

Findings

The underlying logic of the lifecycle and teleology illustrations is found to be the same. The historical processes follow the logic of the lifecycle processes and emphasise the outcomes; the lifecycle process theory illustration is modified by adding outcomes. The current processes are in line with the literal description of the teleology. Teleology processes are illustrated using double-headed arrows between all processes.

Research limitations/implications

Employing the objective and subjective ontological view in the same study might be questioned. The modifications to the process theory illustrations are only one view on the issue and the study does not take a stand on how the imagined future processes might be described.

Practical implications

The study helps researchers and managers better understand the lifecycle and teleology process theory and the role of outcomes in process research. The study should encourage researchers and managers to incorporate the role of process outcomes into their future (business) planning more efficiently, and combine different ontological views.

Originality/value

The study is a rare attempt to develop process theory illustrations.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Saheed O. Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele, Babatunde Jaiyeoba, Kabir Kadiri and Sunday Aderemi David

There have been speculations as to whether environmental friendly buildings are always healthy. Using lifecycle assessment (LCA) methodology, the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

There have been speculations as to whether environmental friendly buildings are always healthy. Using lifecycle assessment (LCA) methodology, the purpose of this paper is to investigate lifecycle relationship between building sustainability and its environmental health impacts

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve this, a block of classroom was modelled with the aid of Revit software, and its lifecycle global warming potential (GWP) and human health impacts were analysed using green building studio and ATHENA impact estimator tools. Sensitivity analyses of the block of classrooms were then carried out by varying the building materials and energy use pattern of the original typology. The LCA was performed for seven alternative typologies that were achieved through variation in the building materials and energy use patterns.

Findings

For all the eight building typologies, the study shows a direct relationship between GWPs and human health impacts. This confirms that the more sustainable a building, the less its tendency for having negative health effects on building operatives, occupants and the wider environment. Again, the more green a building in terms of its materials and energy use pattern, the healthier the building becomes.

Research limitations/implications

The human health impacts was evaluated by measuring amount of particulate matter (PM2.5) produced by the buildings while environmental impact was evaluated by measuring global warming (KgCO2) potentials of the buildings throughout its lifecycle. The study has been based on the impacts of building materials and energy use patterns over the entire lifecycle of the buildings and materials used for construction.

Originality/value

The study established a positive relationship between GWP of building and its human health impacts. Thus, all arguments relating to the relationship between building sustainability and health are laid to rest by the paper.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Ignacio Danvila-del-Valle, Francisco J. Lara, Edmundo Marroquín-Tovar and Pablo E. Zegarra Saldaña

Organizations that offer services based on knowledge and innovation consider their recruitment process as strategic. The purpose of this paper is to consider that…

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1416

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations that offer services based on knowledge and innovation consider their recruitment process as strategic. The purpose of this paper is to consider that organizational lifecycle is related with the management styles through innovation climate and human dimension of recruitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized two methods proposed by Adizes (1976, 1979, 2004). The first one is an inductive, exploratory method with a quantitative approach. The second one utilizes a qualitative approach through semi-structured interviews. The quantitative approach was performed with a questionnaire via internet. The target was executive managers from organizations with more than ten employees, which are offering professional, scientific and technical services. The authors obtained 170 responses.

Findings

Results show that the majority of organizations balance open innovation and control, trending to the first one. During the first stages of the organizational lifecycle, decision-making principally relays on the founder’s open innovation strategies, whereas in the last stages administrative-based control is predominant.

Research limitations/implications

The authors must highlight that this study has been performed for the case of services companies placed only in Mexico. Then, the extrapolation and generalization of results should be dealt carefully.

Practical implications

The authors consider the questionnaire very useful for the introduction of open innovation strategies for human resources managers, since it takes into account organizational lifecycle in their human dimension of recruitment processes, it helps to design training and retention programs for employees, and avoids premature aging of the company.

Social implications

Given that today, knowledge management and innovation have become strategic assets of companies, it is necessary a change of mentality in many organizations that facilitates a new perception on the development of innovation. This will only be possible with the firm support of the management of the company and the involvement of all employees in this new task.

Originality/value

Several studies analyze management styles in each stage of organization lifecycle, although they do not link the obtained information to open innovation and human dimension of the recruitment process. The authors work applies the questionnaire of Adizes (1976, 1979, 2004), which relates the organizational life cycle and the management style and discloses the proper management styles with recruiting, training and retention programs to keep flexibility above control to nurture open innovation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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